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Author Topic:   27 SCIENCE FICTIONS THAT BECAME SCIENCE FACTS
Phat
Member
Posts: 11632
From: Denver,Colorado USA
Joined: 12-30-2003
Member Rating: 1.4


Message 1 of 6 (720967)
03-01-2014 5:33 PM


27 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts

This was an interesting article. I was impressed with some of the technological breakthroughs! The artificial skin and the self driving cars were the most amazing.

1. Quadriplegic Uses Her Mind to Control Her Robotic Arm

2. DARPA Robot Can Traverse an Obstacle Course

3. Genetically Modified Silk Is Stronger Than Steel

4. DNA Was Photographed for the First Time

5. Invisibility Cloak Technology Took a Huge Leap Forward

6. Spray-On Skin

7. James Cameron Reached the Deepest Known Point in the Ocean

8. Stem Cells Could Extend Human Life by Over 100 Years

9. 3-D Printer Creates Full-Size Houses in One Session

10. Self-Driving Cars Are Legal in Nevada, Florida, and California

And 17 more!!

Edited by Phat, : No reason given.


Replies to this message:
 Message 2 by Coyote, posted 03-01-2014 9:54 PM Phat has responded

  
Coyote
Member (Idle past 86 days)
Posts: 6117
Joined: 01-12-2008


(1)
Message 2 of 6 (720972)
03-01-2014 9:54 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by Phat
03-01-2014 5:33 PM


That list is pretty anemic.

How about landing on the moon? Or space travel itself.

The list of what SF imagined has become our present, and will be our future.

The main thing that SF in the past has taught is that a large part of our future depends on technology, and that its a hopeful future.

A lot of fiction, and real life now-a-days teaches the exact opposite.

"Only one earth" is a prime example, just as we're on the verge of expanding into the rest of the universe. Bah!


Religious belief does not constitute scientific evidence, nor does it convey scientific knowledge.

Belief gets in the way of learning--Robert A. Heinlein

How can I possibly put a new idea into your heads, if I do not first remove your delusions?--Robert A. Heinlein

It's not what we don't know that hurts, it's what we know that ain't so--Will Rogers

If I am entitled to something, someone else is obliged to pay--Jerry Pournelle

If a religion's teachings are true, then it should have nothing to fear from science...--dwise1

"Multiculturalism" does not include the American culture. That is what it is against.


This message is a reply to:
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Replies to this message:
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 Message 4 by Phat, posted 03-02-2014 2:42 AM Coyote has acknowledged this reply

  
anglagard
Member
Posts: 2184
From: Socorro, New Mexico USA
Joined: 03-18-2006


(1)
Message 3 of 6 (720980)
03-02-2014 12:35 AM
Reply to: Message 2 by Coyote
03-01-2014 9:54 PM


quote:
"Only one earth" is a prime example, just as we're on the verge of expanding into the rest of the universe. Bah!

I couldn't agree more, but it is no excuse to force ourselves into a pigsty. Even pigs, given a choice, don't want that.

Edited by anglagard, : semicolon where apostrophe needed, time to add light bulbs.


Read not to contradict and confute, not to believe and take for granted, not to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and consider. - Francis Bacon

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Phat
Member
Posts: 11632
From: Denver,Colorado USA
Joined: 12-30-2003
Member Rating: 1.4


Message 4 of 6 (720985)
03-02-2014 2:42 AM
Reply to: Message 2 by Coyote
03-01-2014 9:54 PM


Star Trek
quote:
...we're on the verge of expanding into the rest of the universe.
It will take another hundred years just to get to the nearest star.
This message is a reply to:
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NoNukes
Inactive Member


Message 5 of 6 (721010)
03-02-2014 5:05 PM
Reply to: Message 4 by Phat
03-02-2014 2:42 AM


Re: Star Trek
It will take another hundred years just to get to the nearest star.

That's way too optimistic in my opinion. And is there any point in going to Alpha Centauri? It's a binary star. Seems unlikely that there is anyplace to even land.

Edit

My bad. Alpha Centauri is not the closest star. There is an invisible red dwarf star near it that is slightly closer. Still not worth a human visit.

Edited by NoNukes, : No reason given.


Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

I have never met a man so ignorant that I couldn't learn something from him. Galileo Galilei

If there is no struggle, there is no progress. Those who profess to favor freedom, and deprecate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground, they want rain without thunder and lightning. Frederick Douglass


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anglagard
Member
Posts: 2184
From: Socorro, New Mexico USA
Joined: 03-18-2006


(2)
Message 6 of 6 (721018)
03-02-2014 8:10 PM
Reply to: Message 5 by NoNukes
03-02-2014 5:05 PM


Realistic Colonization for Near Term
NoNukes writes:

My bad. Alpha Centauri is not the closest star. There is an invisible red dwarf star near it that is slightly closer. Still not worth a human visit.

The red dwarf star is Proxima Centauri, which orbits Alpha Centauri - which makes the system trinary rather than binary. There are more likely candidates for planets which could sustain life, such as Epsilon Indi, but they are a bit more than 10 light years away at best.

In the meantime, one could theoretically terraform Mars by altering cometary orbits, shade Venus and create biotech that eats carbon dioxide, or colonize Ganymede and Callisto, just to start, using nuclear power - preferably fusion given how icy they are - for heat and energy.

Small steps first, larger ones are not impossible, just won't happen for awhile.


Read not to contradict and confute, not to believe and take for granted, not to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and consider. - Francis Bacon

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