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Author Topic:   Scene From The Movie: GIANT
Phat
Member
Posts: 10982
From: Denver,Colorado USA
Joined: 12-30-2003
Member Rating: 1.2


(1)
Message 1 of 7 (837220)
07-28-2018 3:55 PM


I recently watched the 1956 movie classic, GIANT. One reason that I watched it is because at the grocery store which I work, we often find random books scattered throughout the store...dropped there by The Bookdrop Project, a clandestine literary initiative done locally here in Denver.

One book which I picked up was Scene From The Movie: GIANT by Tino Villanueva. I watched a You Tube clip of the fight scene itself and...spurred on by the fact that my best friend is from Mexico and has opened my eyes to the cultural diversity within his culture as well as curiosity about mine...so I eventually rented the 3 hour movie and also read Tino Villanuevas book.

This discussion is about the movie and about Tino Villanuevas book of poetry.

Has anyone seen the movie and/or heard of the book of poetry?


Chance as a real force is a myth. It has no basis in reality and no place in scientific inquiry. For science and philosophy to continue to advance in knowledge, chance must be demythologized once and for all. –RC Sproul
"A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." –Mark Twain "
~"If that's not sufficient for you go soak your head."~Faith
You can "get answers" by watching the ducks. That doesn't mean the answers are coming from them.~Ringo

Replies to this message:
 Message 2 by jar, posted 07-28-2018 4:10 PM Phat has responded

  
jar
Member
Posts: 30718
From: Texas!!
Joined: 04-20-2004
Member Rating: 1.7


(1)
Message 2 of 7 (837221)
07-28-2018 4:10 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by Phat
07-28-2018 3:55 PM


You, If No One Else - A Poem by Tino Villanueva from San Marcos Texas

Listen, you
who transformed your anguish
into healthy awareness,
put your voice
where your memory is.
You who swallowed
the afternoon dust,
defend everything you understand
with words.
You, if no one else,
will condemn with your tongue
the erosion each disappointment brings.

You, who saw the images
of disgust growing,
will understand how time
devours the destitute;
you, who gave yourself
your own commandments,
know better than anyone
why you turned your back
on your town's toughest limits.

Don't hush,
don't throw away
the most persistent truth,
as our hard-headed brethren
sometimes do.
Remember well
what your life was like: cloudiness,
and slick mud
after a drizzle;
flimsy windows the wind
kept rattling
in winter, and that
unheated slab dwelling
where coldness crawled
up in your clothes.

Tell how you were able to come
to this point, to unbar
History's doors
to see your early years,
your people, the others.
Name the way
rebellion's calm spirit has served you,
and how you came
to unlearn the lessons
of that teacher,
your land's omnipotent defiler.

Edited by jar, : No reason given.


My Sister's Website: Rose Hill Studios     My Website: My Website

This message is a reply to:
 Message 1 by Phat, posted 07-28-2018 3:55 PM Phat has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 3 by Phat, posted 08-06-2018 11:26 AM jar has responded
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Phat
Member
Posts: 10982
From: Denver,Colorado USA
Joined: 12-30-2003
Member Rating: 1.2


Message 3 of 7 (837578)
08-06-2018 11:26 AM
Reply to: Message 2 by jar
07-28-2018 4:10 PM


Seen The Movie?
Have you ever seen the movie? It addressed racism back in a time when Americans rarely discussed such things...and in its own Hollywood sorta way it portrayed Elizabeth Taylor as the hero in bringing cultural awareness to one Texas family.

Great poem by Tino Villanueva, by the way!


Chance as a real force is a myth. It has no basis in reality and no place in scientific inquiry. For science and philosophy to continue to advance in knowledge, chance must be demythologized once and for all. –RC Sproul
"A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." –Mark Twain "
~"If that's not sufficient for you go soak your head."~Faith
You can "get answers" by watching the ducks. That doesn't mean the answers are coming from them.~Ringo

This message is a reply to:
 Message 2 by jar, posted 07-28-2018 4:10 PM jar has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 4 by jar, posted 08-06-2018 2:49 PM Phat has responded

  
jar
Member
Posts: 30718
From: Texas!!
Joined: 04-20-2004
Member Rating: 1.7


Message 4 of 7 (837592)
08-06-2018 2:49 PM
Reply to: Message 3 by Phat
08-06-2018 11:26 AM


Re: Seen The Movie?
Nope, never saw the movie.

My Sister's Website: Rose Hill Studios     My Website: My Website

This message is a reply to:
 Message 3 by Phat, posted 08-06-2018 11:26 AM Phat has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 5 by Phat, posted 08-09-2018 7:34 PM jar has not yet responded

  
Phat
Member
Posts: 10982
From: Denver,Colorado USA
Joined: 12-30-2003
Member Rating: 1.2


Message 5 of 7 (837837)
08-09-2018 7:34 PM
Reply to: Message 4 by jar
08-06-2018 2:49 PM


Re: Seen The Movie?
Here is the basic plot:
Wiki writes:

Wealthy Texas rancher Jordan "Bick" Benedict Jr. travels to Maryland to buy a horse. There he meets and courts socialite Leslie Lynnton, who ends a budding relationship with British diplomat Sir David Karfrey and marries Bick after a whirlwind romance. They return to Texas to start their life together on the family ranch, Reata, where Bick's older sister Luz runs the household.

Leslie meets Jett Rink, a local handyman, and he becomes infatuated with her. On a ride with Jett, Leslie discovers the local Mexican workers' living conditions are terrible. After tending to one of the Mexican children, Angel Obregon II, she presses Bick to take steps to improve their condition.

When riding Leslie's beloved horse, War Winds, Luz expresses her hostility for Leslie by cruelly digging in her spurs. War Winds bucks her off, killing her. She leaves Jett a small piece of land on the Benedict ranch. Bick, who despises Jett, tries to buy back the land, but Jett refuses to sell. Jett makes the land his home and names it Little Reata. Over the next ten years, Leslie and Bick have twins, Jordan III ("Jordy") and Judy, and later have a daughter, Luz II.

After discovering oil within a footprint left by Leslie, Jett begins digging and strikes oil on his land. He then drives to the Benedict house, covered in crude, to proclaim to the Benedicts that he will be richer than them. Jett makes a pass at Leslie, and this leads to a brief fistfight with Bick before he drives off. Jett's oil drilling company prospers over the years, and he tries to persuade Bick to let him drill for oil on Reata. Bick is determined to preserve his family legacy, however, and refuses.

Meanwhile, tensions arise regarding the now-grown children. Bick insists that Jordy succeed him and run the ranch, but Jordy wants to become a doctor. Leslie wants Judy to attend finishing school in Switzerland, but Judy wants to study animal husbandry at Texas Tech. Both children succeed in pursuing their own vocations, each asking one parent to convince the other to let them have their way.

At the family Christmas party, Bick tries to interest Judy's new husband, Bob Dace, in working on the ranch after he returns from the recently declared war, but Dace refuses. Jett arrives and persuades Bick to allow oil production on his land. Realizing that his children will not take over the ranch when he retires, Bick agrees. Luz II, now in her teens, starts flirting with Jett. Once oil production starts on the ranch, the Benedict family becomes even wealthier and more powerful. Meanwhile, the now-grown Angel is killed in the war, and his body is sent home for burial.

The Benedict–Rink rivalry comes to a head when the Benedicts discover that Luz II and the much older Jett have been dating. At a huge party given by Jett in his own honor at his hotel in Austin, he orders his staff not to serve Jordy's Mexican wife, Juana. Enraged, Jordy tries to start a fight with Jett, who beats him and has him thrown out. Fed up, Bick challenges Jett to a fight. Drunk and almost incoherent, Jett leads the way to a wine storage room. Seeing that Jett is in no state to defend himself, Bick lowers his fists, and instead topples Jett's wine cellar shelves. The Benedict family leaves the party. Jett staggers into the banquet hall, takes his seat of honor, and passes out on the table. Later, Luz II sees Jett drunkenly bemoaning his unrequited love for Leslie. Luz II leaves, heartbroken, as Jett falls over onto the floor.

The next day, on their way home, the Benedicts stop at a diner with a sign at the counter saying, "We reserve the right to refuse service to anyone," which during the mid-twentieth century in the southern United States was often taken as meaning that ethnic minorities were not welcome. The racist owner, Sarge, insults Juana and her and Jordy's son Jordan IV. When the owner goes on to eject a Mexican family from the diner, Bick tells Sarge to leave them alone. Bick fights Sarge, who beats him, but then takes down the sign and tosses it on top of Bick. Back at the ranch, Bick laments that he has failed to preserve the Benedict family legacy. Leslie replies that, after the fight in the diner, he was her hero for the first time, and that she considers their own family legacy a success. They look at their two grandsons, one white and one Hispanic.

Note the underlined part...thats where the fight scene itself plays in and where Tino Villanuevas poetry focuses.

Edited by Phat, : No reason given.


Chance as a real force is a myth. It has no basis in reality and no place in scientific inquiry. For science and philosophy to continue to advance in knowledge, chance must be demythologized once and for all. –RC Sproul
"A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." –Mark Twain "
~"If that's not sufficient for you go soak your head."~Faith
You can "get answers" by watching the ducks. That doesn't mean the answers are coming from them.~Ringo

This message is a reply to:
 Message 4 by jar, posted 08-06-2018 2:49 PM jar has not yet responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 7 by ringo, posted 08-10-2018 12:01 PM Phat has acknowledged this reply

  
Phat
Member
Posts: 10982
From: Denver,Colorado USA
Joined: 12-30-2003
Member Rating: 1.2


Message 6 of 7 (837838)
08-09-2018 7:51 PM
Reply to: Message 2 by jar
07-28-2018 4:10 PM


Tino Villanueva Poetry about the fight scene
Fight Scene Beginning
by Tino Villanueva

Bick Benedict, that is, Rock Hudson in the
Time-clock of the movie, stands up and moves,
Deliberate, toward encounter. He has come out
Of the anxious blur of the backdrop, like

Coming out of the unreal into the world of
What's true, down to earth and distinct; has
Stepped up to Sarge, the younger of the two,

And would sure appreciate it if he: "Were a
Little more polite to these people." Sarge,
Who has something to defend, balks; asks
(In a long-shot) if: "that there papoose down

There, his name Benedict too?," by which he
Means one-year old Jordy in the background
Booth hidden in the bosom of mother love of

Juana, who listens, trying not to listen. Rock
Hudson, his hair already the color of slate,
Who could not foresee this challenge, arms
Akimbo (turning around), contemplates the stable

And straight line of years gone by, says: "Yeah,
Come to think of it, it is." And so acknowledges,
In his heart, his grandson, half-Anglo, half-

Brown. Sarge repents from words, but no
Part of his real self succumbs: "All right—
Forget I asked you. Now you just go back
Over there and sit down and we ain't gonna

Have no trouble. But this bunch here is
Gonna eat somewhere's else." Never shall I
Forget, never how quickly his hand threw my

Breathing off—how quickly he plopped the
Hat heavily askew once more on the old
Man's head, seized two fistsful of shirt and
Coat and lifted his slight body like nothing,

A no-thing, who could have been any of us,
Weightless nobodies bronzed by real-time far
Off somewhere, not here, but in another

Country, yet here, where Rock Hudson's face
Deepens; where in one motion, swift as a
Miracle, he catches Sarge off guard, grabs
His arm somehow, tumbles him back against

The counter and draws fire from Sarge to
Begin the fight up and down the wide screen
Of memory, ablaze in Warner-color light.


Chance as a real force is a myth. It has no basis in reality and no place in scientific inquiry. For science and philosophy to continue to advance in knowledge, chance must be demythologized once and for all. –RC Sproul
"A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." –Mark Twain "
~"If that's not sufficient for you go soak your head."~Faith
You can "get answers" by watching the ducks. That doesn't mean the answers are coming from them.~Ringo

This message is a reply to:
 Message 2 by jar, posted 07-28-2018 4:10 PM jar has not yet responded

  
ringo
Member
Posts: 14920
From: frozen wasteland
Joined: 03-23-2005
Member Rating: 2.1


Message 7 of 7 (837885)
08-10-2018 12:01 PM
Reply to: Message 5 by Phat
08-09-2018 7:34 PM


Re: Seen The Movie?
Phat writes:

Here is the basic plot:


I've only seen the first four paragraphs.

You might be interested in No Way Out (1950) with Sidney Poitier and Richard Widmark.


And our geese will blot out the sun.

This message is a reply to:
 Message 5 by Phat, posted 08-09-2018 7:34 PM Phat has acknowledged this reply

  
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