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Author Topic:   Aquatic Ape theory?
arrogantape
Member (Idle past 2022 days)
Posts: 87
Joined: 09-26-2008


Message 136 of 138 (609456)
03-20-2011 2:11 PM


The evidence is mounting
Around 70,000 years ago the earth turned very ugly and wiped out all humans save for a few thousand living in southern Africa coastal caves. In the caves archaeologists found ochre, fancy tools, and lots of bivalve leftovers. These were our ancestors. Scientists found complex tools and red ochre at a location in Pinnacle Point South Africa. They also found lots of bivalve left overs.

By 70,000 years ago this culture spread to other coastal sites. Out of these oyster eaters came all the rest of us. It has been postulated the ready protein the community had fueled the final brain development needed for our modern human intellect. A coastal cave site used between 75,000 years and 55,000 years yielded the same inventive tools and ochre use, and lots of bivalve feast leftovers.

I say, if clam eating enabled brain enhancement for H sapiens, then it follows the full hominid line might have followed the same successful food strategy, being steady brain growth followed the hominid succession.


Replies to this message:
 Message 137 by anglagard, posted 03-20-2011 10:32 PM arrogantape has not yet responded

    
anglagard
Member (Idle past 80 days)
Posts: 2157
From: Big Spring, TX, USA
Joined: 03-18-2006


Message 137 of 138 (609500)
03-20-2011 10:32 PM
Reply to: Message 136 by arrogantape
03-20-2011 2:11 PM


Re: The evidence is mounting
arrogantape writes:

Around 70,000 years ago the earth turned very ugly and wiped out all humans save for a few thousand living in southern Africa coastal caves.

I am aware the literature postulates a genetic bottleneck some 70,000 years ago, possibly due to the Toba eruption. However, this speculation is controversial as shown here.

quote:
Oppenheimer accepts that the arguments proposed by Rampino and Ambrose are plausible, but they are not yet compelling for two reasons: it is difficult to estimate the global and regional climatic impacts of the eruption, and, at the same time, we cannot conclude with any confidence that the eruption actually preceded the bottleneck.[36] Furthermore, a 2010 geneticists' study seems to question the foundations of the Toba bottleneck theory: analysis of Alu sequences across the entire human genome has shown that the effective human population was already less than 26,000 as far back as 1.2 million years ago, suggesting that no Toba bottleneck was necessary. Possible explanations for the low population size of human ancestors may include repeated population bottlenecks or periodic replacement events from competing Homo subspecies.[37]

What I am puzzled about is how this hypothesis states Toba "wiped out all humans save for a few thousand living in southern Africa coastal caves." Do you have any sources for this information?

In the caves archaeologists found ochre, fancy tools, and lots of bivalve leftovers. These were our ancestors. Scientists found complex tools and red ochre at a location in Pinnacle Point South Africa. They also found lots of bivalve left overs.

How does the consumption of clams provide evidence for the aquatic ape hypothesis? Can humans; well known for their ability to consume virtually anything including pooped out coffee beans, maggot cheese, and poisonous fugu (source) show anything other than that humans could easily find things to eat in tidepools as, among many others, coastal California Indians easily accomplished? I have eaten a few things from tidepools myself, such as raw jingle or cooked abalone and Gooeduk clam.

By 70,000 years ago this culture spread to other coastal sites. Out of these oyster eaters came all the rest of us. It has been postulated the ready protein the community had fueled the final brain development needed for our modern human intellect. A coastal cave site used between 75,000 years and 55,000 years yielded the same inventive tools and ochre use, and lots of bivalve feast leftovers.

So how does it follow that one specific set of coastal humans from 70,000 years ago are the common ancestor of all? Is the evidence mitochondrial, from the Y-chromosome? what is the source so we can all check its accuracy through references and peer-reviewed research? Have all other potential ancestor populations other than those from caves in southern Africa been convincingly ruled out as ancestors?

I say, if clam eating enabled brain enhancement for H sapiens, then it follows the full hominid line might have followed the same successful food strategy, being steady brain growth followed the hominid succession.

Why would eating clams enable more brain development than eating bone marrow, antelope, pheasants, or eggs? Are you referring to a high protein diet?

Unconvincing so far, please elaborate.

Edited by anglagard, : elaboration.

Edited by anglagard, : add bone marrow (another speculated source of protein)


The idea of the sacred is quite simply one of the most conservative notions in any culture, because it seeks to turn other ideas - uncertainty, progress, change - into crimes.
ó Salman Rushdie

This rudderless world is not shaped by vague metaphysical forces. It is not God who kills the children. Not fate that butchers them or destiny that feeds them to the dogs. Itís us. Only us. - the character Rorschach in Watchmen


This message is a reply to:
 Message 136 by arrogantape, posted 03-20-2011 2:11 PM arrogantape has not yet responded

    
arrogantape
Member (Idle past 2022 days)
Posts: 87
Joined: 09-26-2008


Message 138 of 138 (609507)
03-21-2011 12:31 AM


My latest source is this: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/...eology/human-migration.html

Granted, this article is made for public information. Please understand, I do not subscribe to the aquatic ape theory.

I am saying our laid out posture, subcutaneous fat, naked body, flipper like feet, grasping hands, etc.... should make one wonder why we are so visually different than our close cousins, the chimpanzees.

I used the word clams after saying bivalve many times. Of course, their diet was more than clams. Anything edible in the sea was eaten.

The special tools, art, jewelry, and ochre use is not found over Africa. One only finds tools not much more advanced than the venerable hand ax.

The Proboscis monkey, Allen's monkey, and another that slips my mind, use the water for safety, travel, and foraging. There is no damn reason to think we couldn't have done the same thing. The coastal cave digs prove we were diving for easy eats at least 146,000 years ago.


    
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