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Author Topic:   The Trump Presidency
NoNukes
Member
Posts: 10217
From: Central NC USA
Joined: 08-13-2010
Member Rating: 1.7


Message 1591 of 1759 (826153)
12-23-2017 10:34 AM
Reply to: Message 1588 by Percy
12-23-2017 9:57 AM


Re: The Truth About the New Tax Plan
A couple of comments:

It is the eighth biggest since 1918.

Eliminating the mandate should have only a small effect on insurance rates.

So a couple more whoppers from the Big House. No surprise there.

Middle class incomes below say $150,000 will average a 1.6% tax cut.

An interesting point from which to do averaging... That group lumps a bunch of well to do folk in with a bunch of struggling folks, yet taxpaying folks.


Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

I was thinking as long as I have my hands up … they’re not going to shoot me. This is what I’m thinking — they’re not going to shoot me. Wow, was I wrong. -- Charles Kinsey

We got a thousand points of light for the homeless man. We've got a kinder, gentler, machine gun hand. Neil Young, Rockin' in the Free World.

Worrying about the "browning of America" is not racism. -- Faith

I hate you all, you hate me -- Faith


This message is a reply to:
 Message 1588 by Percy, posted 12-23-2017 9:57 AM Percy has acknowledged this reply

    
RAZD
Member
Posts: 19397
From: the other end of the sidewalk
Joined: 03-14-2004
Member Rating: 2.1


Message 1592 of 1759 (826161)
12-23-2017 11:19 AM
Reply to: Message 1587 by Percy
12-23-2017 9:41 AM


Re: If This Is America
The Wall Street Journal is locked up tight. I haven't figured out a way to get in.

If they don't want me to read it, then I won't. There are enough news sources that fund their pages with ads, so I don't need to pay extra.

Call me socialist, but all news should be freely accessible to everyone.

Enjoy

ps -- if you need a hack, sometimes you can do a ctrl-A ctrl-C before the sign in box appears, then paste into word.

Edited by RAZD, : .


we are limited in our ability to understand
by our ability to understand
RebelAmerican☆Zen☯Deist
... to learn ... to think ... to live ... to laugh ...
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This message is a reply to:
 Message 1587 by Percy, posted 12-23-2017 9:41 AM Percy has acknowledged this reply

  
Percy
Member
Posts: 16565
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 2.0


Message 1593 of 1759 (826243)
12-27-2017 10:00 AM


Why Does Trump Seem Invulnerable to his Base
If you like most of the rest of the United States are wondering why Trump's base still supports him as strongly as ever, an editorial in yesterday's Washington Post explains why. In To beat President Trump, you have to learn to think like his supporters economist Andrés Miguel Rondón writes:

quote:
If you’re among the majority of Americans who oppose Trump, you can’t understand why. And it’s making you furious. I saw the same thing happen in my native Venezuela with the late Hugo Chávez, who ruled as precisely the sort of faux-populist strongman that Trump now loves to praise. Chávez’s political career (which only ended with his untimely death) seemed not only immune to scandal, but indeed to profit directly from it. Why? Because scandal is no threat to populism. Scandal sustains populism.

You got that? Scandal sustains populism! But why? Rondón explains:

quote:
Like all populists, Trump offers a much different deal — “Vote for me: I will destroy your enemies. They are the reason you are not rich/have less rights/America is not great anymore.” Scandal is the populist’s natural element for the same reason that demolishing buildings makes more noise than constructing them. His supporters didn’t vote for silence. They voted for a bang.

That's why populism works. It invents enemies, your enemies, and vows to destroy them for you. Of course it's incredibly popular - that's why it's called populism. It's also called racism, bigotry, xenophobia, stealing, pollution, misogyny, cover-up, and last but not least, blatant lying. Rondón continues:

quote:
That’s how populism works. As long as Trump is still swinging back, scandals help him to polarize the country further. The scorn of his adversaries, in the eyes of his supporters, proves that he’s doing exactly what they voted him for to do: dismantling a rigged system that they believe destroyed their hopes.

What do we do? Well, Rondón has some advice about what not to do (parenthesized links to other editorials removed - see the full text of the editorial if you want to see them):

quote:
Sheer outrage at the president’s scandals is pointless. When directed at Trump, your anger gives him rhetorical ammunition to point toward his besiegers to bolster his claims to be fighting for his base. But worse still is directing your anger at his supporters. Then you’re doing the same thing Trump is: believing your side is all right and the opposite side is all wrong. Rejecting your common humanity and sense of country, you’re playing into the polarization game instead of defeating it.

Okay, so that's what not to do. But what do we do? The answer is obvious, and Rondón tells us that, too:

quote:
If dwelling on scandal too much can be counterproductive, then the focus must be elsewhere. Again, I believe it should rest on understanding and emphasizing with the grievances that brought Trump to power (wage stagnation, cultural isolation, a depleted countryside, the opioid crisis). Trump’s solutions may be imaginary, but the problems are very real indeed. Populism is and has always been the daughter of political despair. Showing concern is the only way to break the rhetorical polarization.

Finally, there is indeed a place for your legitimate moral outrage: not the dining table, but the voting booth. Just ask Alabama Democrats.


--Percy

Edited by Percy, : Grammar.


Replies to this message:
 Message 1594 by caffeine, posted 12-27-2017 12:33 PM Percy has acknowledged this reply
 Message 1595 by NoNukes, posted 12-27-2017 1:17 PM Percy has acknowledged this reply
 Message 1598 by Phat, posted 12-29-2017 8:58 AM Percy has acknowledged this reply

    
caffeine
Member
Posts: 1380
From: Prague, Czech Republic
Joined: 10-22-2008
Member Rating: 2.7


Message 1594 of 1759 (826254)
12-27-2017 12:33 PM
Reply to: Message 1593 by Percy
12-27-2017 10:00 AM


Re: Why Does Trump Seem Invulnerable to his Base
That's why populism works. It invents enemies, your enemies, and vows to destroy them for you.

It also helps, of course, that standing amongst the enemies perceived by Trump's supporters are the 'liberal media establishment'. News critical of Trump easily looks like the globalists fighting back. Which is why my heart dies a little whenever I see something like the cringeworthy whining of CNN over the stupid wrestling video tweet. This kind of over-the-top melodrama undermines the media's credibility when it comes to serious and relevant criticism, and strengthens the view of Trump supporters that the 'lamestream media' are out to destroy Trump at any cost.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 1593 by Percy, posted 12-27-2017 10:00 AM Percy has acknowledged this reply

Replies to this message:
 Message 1597 by Taq, posted 12-27-2017 5:46 PM caffeine has not yet responded

  
NoNukes
Member
Posts: 10217
From: Central NC USA
Joined: 08-13-2010
Member Rating: 1.7


(1)
Message 1595 of 1759 (826256)
12-27-2017 1:17 PM
Reply to: Message 1593 by Percy
12-27-2017 10:00 AM


Re: Why Does Trump Seem Invulnerable to his Base
That's why populism works. It invents enemies, your enemies, and vows to destroy them for you.

I think populism is latching onto enemies that people already have. I don't think folks like Trump have invented anything. They latch on and inflame what is already there.

(wage stagnation, cultural isolation, a depleted countryside, the opioid crisis).

If the Democrats don't have solutions for these things they are done. But I don't think the populist folks want Democratic solutions. They want the Muslims and the Hispanics gone, the black folks in their places, and their football games free from protests.


Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

I was thinking as long as I have my hands up … they’re not going to shoot me. This is what I’m thinking — they’re not going to shoot me. Wow, was I wrong. -- Charles Kinsey

We got a thousand points of light for the homeless man. We've got a kinder, gentler, machine gun hand. Neil Young, Rockin' in the Free World.

Worrying about the "browning of America" is not racism. -- Faith

I hate you all, you hate me -- Faith


This message is a reply to:
 Message 1593 by Percy, posted 12-27-2017 10:00 AM Percy has acknowledged this reply

    
Percy
Member
Posts: 16565
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 2.0


Message 1596 of 1759 (826277)
12-27-2017 4:57 PM


Vanity Fair posted a twitter video suggesting New Year's resolutions for Hillary Clinton that has liberal panties all in a bunch. Plenty of fun is being had at Donald Trump's expense - can't Hillary people teach Trump supporters how to take a joke?

Maybe because I'm not a Hillary supporter I couldn't see why those who are were offended, but In truth I didn't find the video funny. Just seemed like a failed attempt at humor. Trump's combination of arrogance and incompetence makes him a prime humor target, but Hillary, at least to me, just seems sad and pathetic, so a different approach to humor seemed necessary.

AbE: The Washington Post just posted an opinion piece about the Vanity Fair video: Please stop talking about Hillary Clinton. Brief quote:

quote:
The video had sexist overtones, and the lameness of the jokes made them all the more offensive. It’s harder to plead comedic license when your comedy isn’t funny.

--Percy

Edited by Percy, : AbE.

Edited by Percy, : Fix link.


    
Taq
Member
Posts: 7309
Joined: 03-06-2009
Member Rating: 3.3


Message 1597 of 1759 (826279)
12-27-2017 5:46 PM
Reply to: Message 1594 by caffeine
12-27-2017 12:33 PM


Re: Why Does Trump Seem Invulnerable to his Base
caffeine writes:


It also helps, of course, that standing amongst the enemies perceived by Trump's supporters are the 'liberal media establishment'. News critical of Trump easily looks like the globalists fighting back. Which is why my heart dies a little whenever I see something like the cringeworthy whining of CNN over the stupid wrestling video tweet. This kind of over-the-top melodrama undermines the media's credibility when it comes to serious and relevant criticism, and strengthens the view of Trump supporters that the 'lamestream media' are out to destroy Trump at any cost.

What undermines credibility is when a group of people focuses on one story that doesn't mean anything, and then ignores piles of credible and fact based reports that show them in a poor light.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 1594 by caffeine, posted 12-27-2017 12:33 PM caffeine has not yet responded

  
Phat
Member
Posts: 10435
From: Denver,Colorado USA
Joined: 12-30-2003
Member Rating: 1.2


(1)
Message 1598 of 1759 (826342)
12-29-2017 8:58 AM
Reply to: Message 1593 by Percy
12-27-2017 10:00 AM


Re: Why Does Trump Seem Invulnerable to his Base
I just reread an older article from The Atlantic titled What Is A Populist and it had some observations:
The Atlantic writes:

No definition of populism will fully describe all populists. That’s because populism is a “thin ideology” in that it “only speaks to a very small part of a political agenda,” according to Cas Mudde, a professor at the University of Georgia and the co-author of Populism: A Very Short Introduction. An ideology like fascism involves a holistic view of how politics, the economy, and society as a whole should be ordered. Populism doesn’t; it calls for kicking out the political establishment, but it doesn’t specify what should replace it. So it’s usually paired with “thicker” left- or right-wing ideologies like socialism or nationalism.(...)Populists are dividers, not uniters, Mudde told me. They split society into “two homogenous and antagonistic groups: the pure people on the one end and the corrupt elite on the other,” and say they’re guided by the “will of the people.”

Sounds to me a bit like dividing people into believers and unbelievers!
The Atlantic writes:

Something fundamental in Trump’s approach to politics changed around the time that Steve Bannon, now the president’s chief strategist in the White House, joined the businessman’s campaign, according to Mudde. Trump had been condemning America’s allegedly incompetent political leaders for decades. But when Trump launched his presidential bid, he was not, in Mudde’s mind, a populist. Over time, however, he’s come to style himself as one, in ways that help illuminate why Trump does what he does and says what he says.

Trump’s initial political vocabulary included the corrupt elite but not the pure people. Instead, in rambling speeches, he focused on just one person: himself. “Our country needs a truly great leader ... that wrote The Art of the Deal,” Trump declared in announcing his candidacy. Gradually, however, his speeches grew more coherent and populist. His remarks at the Republican National Convention—which were written by aide Stephen Miller, who developed a taste for “nation-state populism” while working for Senator Jeff Sessions—marked a transitional moment. “I alone can fix” the broken system in Washington, Trump said, promising to serve as the “voice” of the “forgotten men and women of our country.” By Inauguration Day, the transformation was complete: Trump’s rhetoric was thoroughly populist. “January 20th 2017, will be remembered as the day the people became the rulers of this nation again,” he proclaimed. That speech was written by Miller and Bannon, who envisions Trump leading a new “economic nationalist movement” modeled on the “populism” of the 19th-century U.S. President Andrew Jackson.

I love reading what other writers write. It helps me understand the human condition in general!


Chance as a real force is a myth. It has no basis in reality and no place in scientific inquiry. For science and philosophy to continue to advance in knowledge, chance must be demythologized once and for all. –RC Sproul
"A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." –Mark Twain "
~"If that's not sufficient for you go soak your head."~Faith
Paul was probably SO soaked in prayer nobody else has ever equaled him.~Faith :)

This message is a reply to:
 Message 1593 by Percy, posted 12-27-2017 10:00 AM Percy has acknowledged this reply

  
Percy
Member
Posts: 16565
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 2.0


Message 1599 of 1759 (826394)
12-30-2017 8:23 AM


World Confidence in Trump Down - Way Down
I missed this Pew Research Center piece when it came out in June, but a Politico article I was reading just linked to it, so here it is: U.S. Image Suffers as Publics Around World Question Trump’s Leadership. Here's the first paragraph and the opening chart:

quote:
Although he has only been in office a few months, Donald Trump’s presidency has had a major impact on how the world sees the United States. Trump and many of his key policies are broadly unpopular around the globe, and ratings for the U.S. have declined steeply in many nations. According to a new Pew Research Center survey spanning 37 nations, a median of just 22% has confidence in Trump to do the right thing when it comes to international affairs. This stands in contrast to the final years of Barack Obama’s presidency, when a median of 64% expressed confidence in Trump’s predecessor to direct America’s role in the world.

And this was back in June, 6 months ago. Naturally it must be even worse now.

--Percy

Edited by Percy, : Grammar.


Replies to this message:
 Message 1600 by Phat, posted 12-30-2017 8:28 AM Percy has acknowledged this reply

    
Phat
Member
Posts: 10435
From: Denver,Colorado USA
Joined: 12-30-2003
Member Rating: 1.2


Message 1600 of 1759 (826396)
12-30-2017 8:28 AM
Reply to: Message 1599 by Percy
12-30-2017 8:23 AM


Re: World Confidence in Trump Down - Way Down
Thats what happens when populist nationalism replaces balance global consensus.

Im just wondering how long populism will be in power?

If the world gets tired of us, we could suffer by not having them help us should we need it.


Chance as a real force is a myth. It has no basis in reality and no place in scientific inquiry. For science and philosophy to continue to advance in knowledge, chance must be demythologized once and for all. –RC Sproul
"A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." –Mark Twain "
~"If that's not sufficient for you go soak your head."~Faith
Paul was probably SO soaked in prayer nobody else has ever equaled him.~Faith :)

This message is a reply to:
 Message 1599 by Percy, posted 12-30-2017 8:23 AM Percy has acknowledged this reply

  
Percy
Member
Posts: 16565
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 2.0


(1)
Message 1601 of 1759 (826398)
12-30-2017 9:37 AM


In NYT Interview Trump Makes False or Misleading Claims Every 75 Seconds
Ojn Thursday, December 28, Trump participated in a 30 minute interview with New York Times reporter Michael S. Schmidt: Trump Interview. The Washington Post has now fact-checked the interview and reported the results in this article: In a 30-minute interview, President Trump made 24 false or misleading claims. Here are the most egregious items. The text was cut-n-pasted from the article:

  • “I think it’s been proven that there is no collusion.”

    Trump is entitled to his own opinion, but he sidesteps the fact that the investigation has revealed that members of the Trump campaign interacted with Russians at least 31 times throughout the campaign. There are at least 19 known meetings, in addition to the indictments or guilty pleas of his campaign manager, national security adviser and others. Here’s The Fact Checker’s video on our count.

  • “There was collusion with the Russians and the Democrats. A lot of collusion. . . . Starting with the dossier. But going into so many other elements. And Podesta’s firm.”

    Trump has falsely accused Clinton campaign manager John Podesta of being involved with a Russian company. Tony Podesta co-founded the Podesta Group, a lobbying firm, with his brother John. But it’s a U.S.-based company, not a company in Russia. Trump likely is referring to the Podesta Group being paid $170,000 over six months to represent Sberbank, a Russian bank. The Podesta Group said its work for Sberbank USA was “never about getting sanctions lifted,” and “was simply about helping to clarify to what extent our client, the U.S. subsidiary [of Sberbank], was subject to sanctions. We confirmed they were not.” As for alleged collusion between the Democrats and Russia, Trump is referring to the fact that Fusion GPS, the political research firm that assembled the dossier as part of an assignment for Democrats, relied on a British intelligence agent who used Russian sources for his research. So that’s a rather big stretch.

  • “There was tremendous collusion on behalf of the Russians and the Democrats. There was no collusion with respect to my campaign.”

    This is a breathtakingly false statement. Little evidence has emerged of any collusion between the Democrats and Russia, whereas evidence has emerged of many contacts between Trump campaign officials and Russian-linked individuals. The FBI, CIA and National Security Agency earlier this year concluded that Russian President Vladimir Putin and his government “aspired to help President-elect Trump’s election chances when possible by discrediting Secretary Clinton and publicly contrasting her unfavorably to him.”

  • “What I’ve done is, I have absolute right to do what I want to do with the Justice Department.”

    Presidents do not have unfettered right to interfere with Justice Department investigations, unless they are actively seeking a constitutional crisis.

  • “I’m the one that saved coal. I’m the one that created jobs. You know West Virginia is doing fantastically now.”

    West Virginia’s gross domestic product increased 3 percent in the first quarter of 2017. The recent bump is due in part to the increased price of metallurgic coal, which is used to make steel, and a price increase in natural gas exports. West Virginia produces roughly 5 percent of the natural gas in the U.S. and as the price of natural gas rises, the demand for coal increases, spurring growth in the state. Trump can’t take credit for the change in prices, which fluctuate with market forces. He previously earned Four Pinocchios for this claim, but he keeps saying it.

  • “They made the Russian story up as a hoax, as a ruse, as an excuse for losing an election that in theory Democrats should always win with the electoral college. The electoral college is so much better suited to the Democrats.”

    Trump is falsely labeling nonpartisan investigations as made up by Democrats. The CIA concluded in 2016 that Russia intervened in the U.S. presidential election to help elect Trump, an assessment backed up by FBI Director James B. Comey and then-Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. As we noted, the intelligence community released a declassified report expressing “high confidence” in this judgment. Senate and House committees led by Republicans have begun their own investigations, and a special prosecutor has been appointed. Meanwhile, Democrats obviously do not have an electoral college lock. According to a tally by John Pitney of Claremont McKenna College, every Republican president since Rutherford B. Hayes in 1876 won a larger share of the electoral college votes than Trump, with the exception of George W. Bush (twice) and Richard Nixon in 1968.

  • “I was for Strange [Republican Senatorial primary opponent of Roy Moore in Alabama], and I brought Strange up 20 points. Just so you understand. When I endorsed him, he was in fifth place. He went way up. Almost 20 points.”

    Polls indicate that Trump’s endorsement made little difference — and in fact Strange lost to Roy Moore by a greater margin than polls suggested at the time of Trump’s endorsement. While Trump says Strange was in fifth place, there were only three candidates in the GOP primary.

  • “I endorsed him [Alabama senate candidate Roy Moore]. It became a much closer race because of my endorsement. People don’t say that. They say, ‘Oh, Donald Trump lost.’ I didn’t lose, I brought him up a lot.”

    Polls can vary, but there is little evidence this is the case. The fact remains that Moore lost an election in a state where Democrats usually lose by double digits.

  • “I know the details of taxes better than anybody. Better than the greatest C.P.A. I know the details of health care better than most, better than most.”

    Lawmakers who dealt with Trump on taxes and especially health care privately told reporters they were shocked how little he knew about these issues.

  • “We’ve created associations, millions of people are joining associations. Millions. That were formerly in Obamacare or didn’t have insurance. Or didn’t have health care. Millions of people.”

    Trump is referring to an executive order, mentioned above, but it has no force in law on its own and no one has yet joined these associations. The rules spelling out how the executive order would work have not been issued yet, so Trump is simply making up his “millions” number.

  • “Now that the individual mandate is officially killed, people have no idea how big a deal that was. It’s the most unpopular part of Obamacare. But now, Obamacare is essentially … You know, you saw this. … It’s basically dead over a period of time.”

    While the individual mandate was an important incentive for Americans to seek health insurance, it was only one part of a far-reaching law that remains intact. The repeal does not take effect until 2019, and enrollment in Obamacare has remained strong. The Congressional Budget Office says the marketplaces are expected to remain stable for years.

  • “We see the drugs pouring into the country, we need the wall.”

    The wall will have virtually no effect on drugs coming into the country. According to reports by the DEA, the majority of drugs are smuggled through legal ports of entry or smuggled through underground tunnels. Trump previously earned Four Pinocchios for this claim, but he keeps saying it.

See the article for all 24 Trump errors.

--Percy

Edited by Percy, : Change Title.


Replies to this message:
 Message 1602 by nwr, posted 12-30-2017 2:46 PM Percy has responded

    
nwr
Member
Posts: 5550
From: Geneva, Illinois
Joined: 08-08-2005


Message 1602 of 1759 (826422)
12-30-2017 2:46 PM
Reply to: Message 1601 by Percy
12-30-2017 9:37 AM


Re: In NYT Interview Trump Lies Every 75 Seconds
Those aren't lies.

They are all false statements that Trump made. But Trump believes all of them, so they weren't lies. He wasn't asserting what he believed to be false.


Fundamentalism - the anti-American, anti-Christian branch of American Christianity

This message is a reply to:
 Message 1601 by Percy, posted 12-30-2017 9:37 AM Percy has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 1603 by Percy, posted 12-30-2017 3:18 PM nwr has acknowledged this reply

  
Percy
Member
Posts: 16565
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 2.0


Message 1603 of 1759 (826424)
12-30-2017 3:18 PM
Reply to: Message 1602 by nwr
12-30-2017 2:46 PM


Re: In NYT Interview Trump Makes False or Misleading Claims Every 75 Seconds
I thought "false or misleading claims," the phrase from the title of the article, wouldn't fit in the message subtitle, but it turns out it does, so I changed the message subtitle.

--Percy

Edited by Percy, : Change title.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 1602 by nwr, posted 12-30-2017 2:46 PM nwr has acknowledged this reply

    
Percy
Member
Posts: 16565
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 2.0


Message 1604 of 1759 (826425)
12-30-2017 3:22 PM


Cultural, not Policy, Reasons for Opposing Trumpism
In today's New York Times conservative columnist Bret Stephens explains Why I’m Still a NeverTrumper. Highlights:

quote:
And want to preserve your own republican institutions? Then pay attention to the character of your leaders, the culture of governance and the political health of the public. It matters a lot more than lowering the top marginal income tax rate by a couple of percentage points.

This is the fatal mistake of conservatives who’ve decided the best way to deal with Trump’s personality — the lying, narcissism, bullying, bigotry, crassness, name calling, ignorance, paranoia, incompetence and pettiness — is to pretend it doesn’t matter. “Character Doesn’t Count” has become a de facto G.O.P. motto. “Virtue Doesn’t Matter” might be another.

But character does count, and virtue does matter, and Trump’s shortcomings prove it daily.
...
Responsibility invariably lies with the president’s intemperance and dishonesty.
...
Now look at the culture of governance. Trump demands testimonials from his cabinet, servility from Republican politicians and worship from conservative media. To serve in this White House isn’t to be elevated to public service. It’s to be debased into toadyism, which probably explains the record-setting staff turnover of 34 percent, according to an analysis from the Brookings Institution.
...
Trump is empowering a conservative political culture that celebrates everything that patriotic Americans should fear: the cult of strength, open disdain for truthfulness, violent contempt for the Fourth Estate, hostility toward high culture and other types of “elitism,” a penchant for conspiracy theories and, most dangerously, white-identity politics.


--Percy


Replies to this message:
 Message 1605 by Percy, posted 12-30-2017 3:29 PM Percy has acknowledged this reply

    
Percy
Member
Posts: 16565
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 2.0


Message 1605 of 1759 (826427)
12-30-2017 3:29 PM
Reply to: Message 1604 by Percy
12-30-2017 3:22 PM


Re: Cultural, not Policy, Reasons for Opposing Trumpism
I originally posted Message 1604 as a new thread instead of as a response to this thread. Before I noticed the error Nwr posted a response at Message 2, here it is:

nwr in Message 2 of Thread Cultural, not Policy, Reasons for Opposing Trumpism writes:

My main disagreement, is that it puts too much blame on Trump.
The Republican party had already taken a turn toward evil, long before Trump got into politics. I've been seeing the Republicans as "unfit to govern" for around 30 years. But, arguably, it started before then, when they went with "the Southern Strategy" to use racism as a core, albeit unstated, principle.

The Republican Party went for a Faustian bargain. And that, in turn, allowed the party to be co-opted by Trump.

--Percy


This message is a reply to:
 Message 1604 by Percy, posted 12-30-2017 3:22 PM Percy has acknowledged this reply

    
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