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Author Topic:   The Eclipse Conspiracy
Tanypteryx
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Posts: 1578
From: Oregon, USA
Joined: 08-27-2006
Member Rating: 6.1


(1)
Message 31 of 57 (818018)
08-22-2017 4:26 PM


Eclipse Crowds in Oregon
I don't know if anyone will ever have an accurate count of the number of people who came to Oregon for the eclipse.

Big Summit Prairie is a large ranch in the Ochoco Mountains of Central Oregon a few miles from the cattle ranch where I grew up. There was a Oregon Eclipse 2017 At Big Summit Prairie, Crook County, OR event planned that drew an estimated 110,000 people at $300 each.

This is in the middle of the Oregon outback, many miles from the nearest small town. From what I have read there were only a few dozen showers and portable latrines.

It was kind of a combination Woodstock/Burning Man festival.


I especially like this sign, wondering what it takes to be labeled "a frothin' weirdo" at an event like this?

Symbiosis lights up the forest for thousands of revelers

Oregon Eclipse Festival Pairs Glitter And Heavy Machinery

Edited by Tanypteryx, : Added a couple more links


What if Eleanor Roosevelt had wings? -- Monty Python

One important characteristic of a theory is that is has survived repeated attempts to falsify it. Contrary to your understanding, all available evidence confirms it. --Subbie

If evolution is shown to be false, it will be at the hands of things that are true, not made up. --percy

The reason that we have the scientific method is because common sense isn't reliable. -- Taq


Replies to this message:
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NoNukes
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Posts: 9928
From: Central NC USA
Joined: 08-13-2010
Member Rating: 3.2


(1)
Message 32 of 57 (818029)
08-22-2017 5:09 PM
Reply to: Message 31 by Tanypteryx
08-22-2017 4:26 PM


Re: Eclipse Crowds in Oregon
There was a Oregon Eclipse 2017 At Big Summit Prairie, Crook County, OR event planned that drew an estimated 110,000 people at $300 each.

Both your statement and your fantastic pictures hint at a completely different experience from what I saw/heard/lived through. I pulled into a tiny South Carolina town I will probably never have another reason to visit. The town held an eclipse festival, but we ignored pretty much the fanfare except for a visit to the snack trucks and waiting in a twenty-minute line to get free eclipse glasses.

The town folk did try to gouge folks for 15 dollars for parking, but I got in town really early that morning and parked behind an old, no longer in service library building for free. We watched the eclipse from there with about 15 other folks. A few dark clouds interrupted viewing for a while when totality was still under 50 percent or so. That was a bit disappointing, but there was clear viewing from then on.

I hope to learn enough about photography to take some good pictures next time. Thanks for sharing yours.


Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

I was thinking as long as I have my hands up … they’re not going to shoot me. This is what I’m thinking — they’re not going to shoot me. Wow, was I wrong. -- Charles Kinsey

I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as cause for withdrawing from a friend. Thomas Jefferson

Worrying about the "browning of America" is not racism. -- Faith

I hate you all, you hate me -- Faith


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NosyNed
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Posts: 8799
From: Canada
Joined: 04-04-2003
Member Rating: 9.1


(2)
Message 33 of 57 (818036)
08-22-2017 6:47 PM
Reply to: Message 31 by Tanypteryx
08-22-2017 4:26 PM


Re: Eclipse Crowds in Oregon
{qs}I don't know if anyone will ever have an accurate count of the number of people who came to Oregon for the eclipse.[/qs]

I don't know anything accurate but we were lined up in traffic twice trying to head back north.
It was worth it though.


This message is a reply to:
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Tanypteryx
Member
Posts: 1578
From: Oregon, USA
Joined: 08-27-2006
Member Rating: 6.1


Message 34 of 57 (818038)
08-22-2017 6:50 PM
Reply to: Message 33 by NosyNed
08-22-2017 6:47 PM


Re: Eclipse Crowds in Oregon
I don't know anything accurate but we were lined up in traffic twice trying to head back north.
It was worth it though.

So, you got to see totality?


What if Eleanor Roosevelt had wings? -- Monty Python

One important characteristic of a theory is that is has survived repeated attempts to falsify it. Contrary to your understanding, all available evidence confirms it. --Subbie

If evolution is shown to be false, it will be at the hands of things that are true, not made up. --percy

The reason that we have the scientific method is because common sense isn't reliable. -- Taq


This message is a reply to:
 Message 33 by NosyNed, posted 08-22-2017 6:47 PM NosyNed has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 35 by NosyNed, posted 08-23-2017 9:31 AM Tanypteryx has acknowledged this reply

    
NosyNed
Member
Posts: 8799
From: Canada
Joined: 04-04-2003
Member Rating: 9.1


(4)
Message 35 of 57 (818058)
08-23-2017 9:31 AM
Reply to: Message 34 by Tanypteryx
08-22-2017 6:50 PM


Totality
We got a good view. We were near Huntington, OR at a nice spot beside a creek. It was my third but my buddy and my daughter were very awestruck. It is a little different than I remembered from the others.
This message is a reply to:
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Taq
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Posts: 7141
Joined: 03-06-2009
Member Rating: 3.9


(3)
Message 36 of 57 (818071)
08-23-2017 10:56 AM


Easy Peasy
My bet on farm country paid off. 1 hour drive from Boise and I found myself on an asphalt driveway that a farmer was letting people park on for free, just outside of Payette, ID. No traffic, no fuss. Stood out in the Sun as the partial eclipse started and felt the slow cooling, which to my logical brain made sense, but something instinctual found it unnerving.

What I wasn't prepared for was the difference between partial and total eclipse. One moment there is still this bright Sun in the sky, and the next there is the most beautiful black hole you have ever seen.

Like others have said, there is no such thing as a partial solar eclipse. Total is the only way to go.


  
dronestar
Member
Posts: 1362
From: usa
Joined: 11-19-2008


Message 37 of 57 (818097)
08-23-2017 1:08 PM
Reply to: Message 28 by Tanypteryx
08-22-2017 3:06 PM


Re: The Eclipse Conspiracy
Hi Tany,

Sheesh Louise, that's impressive photo equipment. I had hoped to just scotch tape some mylar film to my Kodak Disc camera to get the exact same results you are getting. Errrm, guess not.

Seriously, about the solar filter, is it like the mylar eclipse glasses we all responsibly used? Or something completely else? Do the images you posted need to be retouched at all?

Thanks for sharing your photos, they are appreciated.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 28 by Tanypteryx, posted 08-22-2017 3:06 PM Tanypteryx has responded

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Tanypteryx
Member
Posts: 1578
From: Oregon, USA
Joined: 08-27-2006
Member Rating: 6.1


(2)
Message 38 of 57 (818110)
08-23-2017 3:10 PM
Reply to: Message 37 by dronestar
08-23-2017 1:08 PM


Re: The Eclipse Conspiracy
Seriously, about the solar filter, is it like the mylar eclipse glasses we all responsibly used? Or something completely else?

Something completely different. It is a specially coated optical glass filter that screws in. It is even vented to avoid heat build up. I bought my Questar around 1972 and the solar filter was $300 then, I just checked and they are $625 now.

Do the images you posted need to be retouched at all?

I shoot raw files and use Adobe Raw Converter to do my first pass processing. This includes applying calibration profile to the image specific for my camera, a minimal sharpening and noise reduction if needed, and then exposure and tonality fine tuning. Then I open them in Adobe Photoshop and may do further processing and resizing for print or the web and an output sharpening specific to print size or web.

These eclipse images were given minimal raw processing and then just resized for the web. Any other processing would probably have ruined them. I still need to go through the rest of the images to see if I have any that are better.

I bracketed my exposures, so I want to see if I can pick out images with different levels of exposure that reveal different details within the corona and prominences that can be combined in a composite high dynamic range (HDR) image. Some of the subtle details in the corona can easily be lost if they are over exposed.

I also have not done anything with my pre and post totality images. I saw some people captured the space station crossing the sun's face so I want to check to see if I might have caught that. I could see sunspots while I was shooting those images.


What if Eleanor Roosevelt had wings? -- Monty Python

One important characteristic of a theory is that is has survived repeated attempts to falsify it. Contrary to your understanding, all available evidence confirms it. --Subbie

If evolution is shown to be false, it will be at the hands of things that are true, not made up. --percy

The reason that we have the scientific method is because common sense isn't reliable. -- Taq


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 Message 37 by dronestar, posted 08-23-2017 1:08 PM dronestar has not yet responded

    
caffeine
Member
Posts: 1346
From: Prague, Czech Republic
Joined: 10-22-2008
Member Rating: 3.6


Message 39 of 57 (818181)
08-24-2017 4:31 PM


Why can't I see one?
So I know there's a lot of people interested in science here, by the nature of the forum. Does anyone have the background in astronomy to explain to me why I never see an eclipse?

I recall, all the way back in 1999, that there was excitement about an eclipse in Europe, but this was only a 'partial eclipse' (not sure if that referred only to the particular part of Europe I happened to be in). I recall that it was cloudy, and it got a bit dimmer. I was underwhelmed.

Nothing since then. I figured we should know in advance about this things, so I looked for and found a map of solar eclipses predicted over the next decade. The US had two to look forward to in this time period - in 2023 and 2024 (if you happen to be in Illinois, it looks like you're the lucky ones who get a good view of both).

However, there is nothing anywhere near me. How is that Washington, Illinois and some remote spots in the ocean get two eclipses in a decade, while I see none despite several decades of life. Am I just unlucky in timing, or is there actually some reason that Europe is less likely to fall in the path of an eclipse?


Replies to this message:
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Taq
Member
Posts: 7141
Joined: 03-06-2009
Member Rating: 3.9


Message 40 of 57 (818183)
08-24-2017 4:39 PM
Reply to: Message 39 by caffeine
08-24-2017 4:31 PM


Re: Why can't I see one?
caffeine writes:

I recall, all the way back in 1999, that there was excitement about an eclipse in Europe, but this was only a 'partial eclipse' (not sure if that referred only to the particular part of Europe I happened to be in). I recall that it was cloudy, and it got a bit dimmer. I was underwhelmed.

That's about the extent of it. 99% coverage is not 99% of a total eclipse, as far as the spectacle goes. Excusing the pun, but the difference between a partial eclipse and a total eclipse is night and day.

However, there is nothing anywhere near me. How is that Washington, Illinois and some remote spots in the ocean get two eclipses in a decade, while I see none despite several decades of life. Am I just unlucky in timing, or is there actually some reason that Europe is less likely to fall in the path of an eclipse?

I would think that you are just unlucky. After having watched the last one, I can say that it would be worth it to at least pay for airfare and fly to the states if you can find a free place to stay (e.g. friends, EvC posters willing to host). There was a ton of price gouging for this last eclipse, so housing could be a problem.


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NoNukes
Member
Posts: 9928
From: Central NC USA
Joined: 08-13-2010
Member Rating: 3.2


Message 41 of 57 (818190)
08-24-2017 5:47 PM
Reply to: Message 39 by caffeine
08-24-2017 4:31 PM


Re: Why can't I see one?
I recall, all the way back in 1999, that there was excitement about an eclipse in Europe, but this was only a 'partial eclipse' (not sure if that referred only to the particular part of Europe I happened to be in

It was partial in your part of Europe. That 1999 spectacle was the last eclipse that was total over large parts of Europe. A review of historical information suggests that there have not been very many eclipses that have been total over large parts of Europe during the past century or more. The next one meeting that description not until 2081, and if you are insisting that the eclipse comes to all the way to you, you will have to wait until 2135.

On the other hand, eclipses that are total over large parts of the US are pretty rare as well. This past one was special in that the moon's shadow was over a diagonal path across the US, starting in the Pacific Ocean, west of the northern west coast, and extending off of the southern US east coast. There is not much room to draw in a path more favorable for Americans.

Am I just unlucky in timing, or is there actually some reason that Europe is less likely to fall in the path of an eclipse?

You are just unlucky. Solar eclipses that exhibit totality over large areas of Europe are rare, but European total eclipses are not so rare. Total solar eclipses in your home town, are of course really rare for all but a lucky few of us.

Edited by NoNukes, : No reason given.


Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

I was thinking as long as I have my hands up … they’re not going to shoot me. This is what I’m thinking — they’re not going to shoot me. Wow, was I wrong. -- Charles Kinsey

I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as cause for withdrawing from a friend. Thomas Jefferson

Worrying about the "browning of America" is not racism. -- Faith

I hate you all, you hate me -- Faith


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ProtoTypical
Member
Posts: 1753
From: Ontario Canada
Joined: 08-04-2010
Member Rating: 3.5


Message 42 of 57 (818207)
08-24-2017 6:58 PM
Reply to: Message 39 by caffeine
08-24-2017 4:31 PM


Re: Why can't I see one?
Does anyone have the background in astronomy to explain to me why I never see an eclipse?

Here is a really good interactive animation. Obviously not to scale.

Given that the fastest way to get a correct answer is to give an incorrect answer I will posit that it has to do with the orbit of the moon being slightly elliptical and off the plain of the earth's orbit and so the shadow usually misses us altogether. I would guess that over a long enough span of time the distribution would be equal.


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Modulous
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Posts: 7429
From: Manchester, UK
Joined: 05-01-2005
Member Rating: 4.0


Message 43 of 57 (818208)
08-24-2017 7:03 PM
Reply to: Message 39 by caffeine
08-24-2017 4:31 PM


Re: Why can't I see one?
So I know there's a lot of people interested in science here, by the nature of the forum. Does anyone have the background in astronomy to explain to me why I never see an eclipse?

They effect only a small region, and its a big planet - mostly covered in water and mostly not near you.

I recall, all the way back in 1999, that there was excitement about an eclipse in Europe, but this was only a 'partial eclipse' (not sure if that referred only to the particular part of Europe I happened to be in). I recall that it was cloudy, and it got a bit dimmer. I was underwhelmed.

I travelled a few hundred miles south west to The Lizard and watched totality. It was awesome. It was merely a partial in Manchester.

Nothing since then. I figured we should know in advance about this things, so I looked for and found a map of solar eclipses predicted over the next decade. The US had two to look forward to in this time period - in 2023 and 2024 (if you happen to be in Illinois, it looks like you're the lucky ones who get a good view of both).

The US Is a big place. From one end to another is twice as far as you would have to have travelled from Prague to come see the eclipse in 1999 from where I saw it in the UK. You could have popped over to Salzburg and seen totality - I think that would have been less travelling than I had to do for you.

A human only generally lives long enough for the earth to experience 50 or 60 eclipses, and you've probably missed the closest one to you in your lifetime.

However, there is nothing anywhere near me. How is that Washington, Illinois and some remote spots in the ocean get two eclipses in a decade, while I see none despite several decades of life. Am I just unlucky in timing, or is there actually some reason that Europe is less likely to fall in the path of an eclipse?

Just unlucky. But then most people are, in that regard. That's why seeing one in person is a big deal -> It usually requires planning and prep and money - or just having the dumb luck to live at the right time in the right place.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_Saros_136

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NoNukes
Member
Posts: 9928
From: Central NC USA
Joined: 08-13-2010
Member Rating: 3.2


(1)
Message 44 of 57 (818219)
08-25-2017 12:25 AM
Reply to: Message 42 by ProtoTypical
08-24-2017 6:58 PM


Re: Why can't I see one?
Given that the fastest way to get a correct answer is to give an incorrect answer I will posit that it has to do with the orbit of the moon being slightly elliptical and off the plain of the earth's orbit and so the shadow usually misses us altogether. I would guess that over a long enough span of time the distribution would be equal.

I think you've nailed it. There is also the issue that the major axis of the moon's orbit actually rotates within the plane of the moon's orbit and the fact that the lunar cycle is not an even fraction of a year. All of those things make the eclipse cycles complex, but folks at similar latitudes ought to experience the same number of eclipses over large spans of time.


Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

I was thinking as long as I have my hands up … they’re not going to shoot me. This is what I’m thinking — they’re not going to shoot me. Wow, was I wrong. -- Charles Kinsey

I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as cause for withdrawing from a friend. Thomas Jefferson

Worrying about the "browning of America" is not racism. -- Faith

I hate you all, you hate me -- Faith


This message is a reply to:
 Message 42 by ProtoTypical, posted 08-24-2017 6:58 PM ProtoTypical has responded

Replies to this message:
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ringo
Member
Posts: 13644
From: frozen wasteland
Joined: 03-23-2005
Member Rating: 2.3


Message 45 of 57 (818251)
08-25-2017 12:11 PM
Reply to: Message 42 by ProtoTypical
08-24-2017 6:58 PM


Re: Why can't I see one?
ProtoTypical writes:

... I will posit that it has to do with the orbit of the moon being slightly elliptical and off the plain of the earth's orbit and so the shadow usually misses us altogether.


What if the path of totality was exactly the same every time? Groundhog Day!
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