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Author Topic:   Top 10 Country Populations
LamarkNewAge
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Posts: 1287
Joined: 12-22-2015
Member Rating: 1.1


Message 16 of 34 (837552)
08-05-2018 3:38 PM


Well.
People (who know me) are so sick of me complaining about how 70% of the world outside of India and China belong to two religions (Christianity and Islam), so I would get those two. (My complaints about people being brainwashed cause me to talk about the "in" & "popular" things like religion)

My endless complaints about Christians and Muslims in the former India (which includes modern post independence India, plus Pakistan, Bangladesh, and - far enough back - Afghanistan) reproducing like jack rabbits while the Hindus are shrinking (down to 60% today compared to 82% 100 years ago), cause me to know several of the others.

I also constantly complain about nations like Indonesia (and Vietnam, Philippines, etc.) having Christian minorities that have a reputation for eating 1000 times more dogs (yes dogs!) than the non-Christians combined. (just ask street vendors who the customers are who buy up the dogs, and also ask the Western visitors about the post Sunday school clubbings of live dogs in the church backyards while the Asian church-going kids are traumatized about the whole thing before the Sunday meal is served to worshippers).

I got most of them (including the fast growing African nation Nigeria).


Replies to this message:
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caffeine
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Posts: 1551
From: Prague, Czech Republic
Joined: 10-22-2008
Member Rating: 2.4


Message 17 of 34 (837582)
08-06-2018 12:23 PM


US States
While the biggest countries in the world was not something surprising to me - I only recently learned the population distribution among US states, and this did surprise me. I would have guessed the top three - but I never realised how large are the differences in population between them. The names of US states are of course all very familiar, and places like Montana look huge on the map, so to learn that a lot of states have negligible population was a bit of a shock.

No fewer than 11 states have a population smaller than the city where I live. According to citypopulation.de I live in the 377th largest urban area in the world, so not exactly a vast metropolis.

California, Texas and New York collectively make up almost a quarter of the US population.


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jar
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Posts: 30934
From: Texas!!
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Message 18 of 34 (837595)
08-06-2018 4:04 PM
Reply to: Message 17 by caffeine
08-06-2018 12:23 PM


Re: US States
And all three, California, Texas and New York have vast areas that are relatively under populated. California is filling up fast though.

My Sister's Website: Rose Hill Studios     My Website: My Website

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NoNukes
Inactive Member


Message 19 of 34 (837602)
08-06-2018 4:30 PM
Reply to: Message 9 by Percy
07-30-2018 7:58 PM


I didn't know all the European countries (except Russia, but it's also in Asia) were so small in population.

While I hadn't given this much thought, I was aware, and I suspect you were als, that the size of the European Union is approximately equal to the size of the United States. Approximating the biggest countries as roughly (France, Spain, UK, and Italy) gives the reasonable estimate for those countries to be about 60-80 million folks. So not all that surprising that they don't crack the top ten.

I could not have put Nigeria or Pakistan on this list.

Edited by NoNukes, : No reason given.


Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

We got a thousand points of light for the homeless man. We've got a kinder, gentler, machine gun hand. Neil Young, Rockin' in the Free World.

Worrying about the "browning of America" is not racism. -- Faith

I hate you all, you hate me -- Faith

No it is based on math I studied in sixth grade, just plain old addition, substraction and multiplication. -- ICANT


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NoNukes
Inactive Member


Message 20 of 34 (837607)
08-06-2018 4:38 PM
Reply to: Message 16 by LamarkNewAge
08-05-2018 3:38 PM


Re: Well.
My endless complaints about Christians and Muslims in the former India (which includes modern post independence India, plus Pakistan, Bangladesh, and - far enough back - Afghanistan) reproducing like jack rabbits while the Hindus are shrinking (down to 60% today compared to 82% 100 years ago), cause me to know several of the others.

What is your complaint, exactly?


Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

We got a thousand points of light for the homeless man. We've got a kinder, gentler, machine gun hand. Neil Young, Rockin' in the Free World.

Worrying about the "browning of America" is not racism. -- Faith

I hate you all, you hate me -- Faith

No it is based on math I studied in sixth grade, just plain old addition, substraction and multiplication. -- ICANT


This message is a reply to:
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jar
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Posts: 30934
From: Texas!!
Joined: 04-20-2004
Member Rating: 1.3


(1)
Message 21 of 34 (837608)
08-06-2018 4:43 PM
Reply to: Message 20 by NoNukes
08-06-2018 4:38 PM


Re: Well.
He seems upset that Hindus chose style and technique over frequency when it came to sex.

My Sister's Website: Rose Hill Studios     My Website: My Website

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LamarkNewAge
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Posts: 1287
Joined: 12-22-2015
Member Rating: 1.1


Message 22 of 34 (837639)
08-07-2018 8:14 AM
Reply to: Message 20 by NoNukes
08-06-2018 4:38 PM


Why I like the Hindus.
quote:

What is your complaint, exactly?

Hinduism (and its off shoots) is perhaps the world's most tolerant religion.

Will Durant said that the Islamic invasion of India was perhaps the most bloody in history.

No Hindu rule for over 1000 years till the mid 20th century.

When Hindus finally gained control of India in 1947, (the first Leader of newly Independent India)Nehru came up with the idea to use a symbol of Ashoka (who had inscriptions in Greek and Aramaic planted throughout the nation's western regions which were an "EDICT" declaring the blessings that come from having people of diverse religions in the nations of the world) on the nations flag.

quote:

Flag of India - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/India_flag

The National Flag of India is a horizontal rectangular tricolour of India saffron, white and India green; with the Ashoka Chakra, a 24-spoke wheel, in navy blue at its centre. It was adopted in its present form during a meeting of the Constituent Assembly held on 22 July 1947, and it became the official flag of the Dominion of India on 15 August 1947.


quote:

68th Republic Day - Indian Flag History & Who Designed ...

celebscinema.com/india/68th-republic-day-indian-flag-history...

The flag was proposed by Nehru at the constituent assembly on 22 July 1947 as a horizontal tricolor of deep saffron, white and dark green in equal proportions, with the Ashoka wheel in blue in the center of the white band.


Nehru rejected the Divine Right of Kings.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divine_right_of_kings

quote:

Independence

In July 1946, Nehru pointedly observed that no princely state could prevail militarily against the army of independent India.[32] In January 1947, he said that independent India would not accept the Divine right of kings,[33] and in May 1947, he declared that any princely state which refused to join the Constituent Assembly would be treated as an enemy state. During the drafting of the Indian constitution, many Indian leaders (except Nehru) of that time were in favour of allowing each Princely state or Covenanting State to be independent as a federal state along the lines suggested originally by the Government of India act (1935). But as the drafting of the constitution progressed and the idea of forming a republic took concrete shape (because of the efforts of Nehru), it was decided that all the Princely states/Covenanting States would merge with the Indian republic. Nehru's daughter, Indira Gandhi, de-recognised all the rulers by a presidential order in 1969. But this was struck down by the Supreme Court of India. Eventually, the government by the 26th Amendment to the constitution was successful in abolishing the Princely states of India. The process began by Nehru was finally completed by his daughter by the end of 1971.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jawaharlal_Nehru


Indira Ghandi was the daughter of Nehru.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indira_Gandhi

She married a Zoroastrian.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feroze_Gandhi

And she was Prime Minister of India (no big deal to the Hindu population of India that a FEMALE married a Zoroastrian!)

She was killed by Sikh nationalist (Sikh bodyguards conspired to kill her).

Sikhs are a minority religious group that make up about 3% (I think) of the population.

Yet the Hindu majority voted for a Sikh to lead the nation for 9 years (2005-2014).


This message is a reply to:
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LamarkNewAge
Member
Posts: 1287
Joined: 12-22-2015
Member Rating: 1.1


Message 23 of 34 (837640)
08-07-2018 8:22 AM
Reply to: Message 21 by jar
08-06-2018 4:43 PM


Re: Well.
quote:

He seems upset

Outside of India and China, Christians are 45% of the worlds population.

Yes, 45%.

Muslims and Christians are over 75% (closer to 80%)

Tell if my numbers are wrong.

And these are not tolerant religions relative to the smaller religions of Hinduism and Buddhism (and they are going to be smaller in number in 2050, the latter will shrink from 7% today down to 5% mid-century).

Netanyahu said that China doesn't have the stink of anti-Semitism like so many other places. No examples of anti-Semitism.

Many religions were able to flourish in areas with Hindu and Buddhist populations (and not much anywhere else once Christianity and Islam were firmly established post 700 CE)


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Percy
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Posts: 17968
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 2.1


(1)
Message 24 of 34 (837664)
08-07-2018 11:05 AM


It's sort of a flow of consciousness style...

--Percy


    
LamarkNewAge
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Posts: 1287
Joined: 12-22-2015
Member Rating: 1.1


Message 25 of 34 (837673)
08-07-2018 11:43 AM


Look at examples of Indian religious flow.
Here is wife of the grandson of Nehru.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maneka_Gandhi

She was married to a man(Nehru's grandson)who was half Hindu/Zoroastrian and she herself had a Sikh mother and father.

(this man was her husband)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanjay_Gandhi

Her husband was the son and brother of successive Prime Ministers of India(Indira Gandhi was her husband's mother and when she was assassinated , his only brother Rajiv Gandhi became PM)

LOOK at this soul though

quote:

Maneka Sanjay Gandhi (also spelled Menaka) (née Anand; born 26 August 1956) is the Indian Union Cabinet Minister for Women & Child Development in the Government of PM Narendra Modi. She is also an animal rights activist, environmentalist, and widow of the Indian politician Sanjay Gandhi. She has been a minister in four governments, and has authored a number of books in the areas of etymology, law and animal welfare. Maneka Gandhi is a member of the Nehru-Gandhi Family.

....

Maneka Gandhi published 'The Complete Book of Muslim and Parsi Names', in recognition of her husband's Zoroastrian faith.[10][11]

....

Activism[edit]

Maneka Gandhi is a self-described environmentalist and animal rights leader in India.[13] She has earned international awards and acclaim.[14] She was appointed chairwoman of the Committee for the Purpose of Control and Supervision of Experiments on Animals (CPCSEA) in 1995. Under her direction, CPCSEA members carried unannounced inspections of laboratories where animals are used for scientific research were conducted.[15][16]

She has filed Public Interest Litigations that have achieved the replacement of the municipal killing of homeless dogs with a sterilisation programme, the unregulated sale of airguns and a ban on mobile or travelling zoos. She currently chairs the Jury of International Energy Globe Foundation which meets annually in Austria to award the best environmental innovations of the year. She is a member of the Eurosolar Board and the Wuppertal Institute, Germany.

She started the organisation People for Animals[17] in 1992 and it is the largest organisation for animal rights/welfare in India. Maneka Gandhi is also a patron of International Animal Rescue. While she is not a vegan,[18] she has advocated this lifestyle on ethical and health grounds. She also anchored the weekly television program Heads and Tails, highlighting the suffering meted out to animals due to their commercial exploitation. She has also authored a book under the same title. Her other books were about Indian people names. She is a cast member for the documentary A Delicate Balance.[19]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maneka_Gandhi


From her husband's Wikipedia page I linked above

quote:

According to Maneka Gandhi, Sanjay wanted to raise his children in the Zoroastrian faith of his family.[35]


Remember that Indira Gandhi was the Prime Minister of India (14 January 1980 – 31 October 1984)and the daughter of the first Prime Minister Nehru. Indira had just 2 sons. One was Rajiv Gandhi who was Prime Minister from 31 October 1984 – 2 December 1989.

Sanjay was the other son of Indira.

Maneka was Sanjay's wife.

Could this lady be considered one of the reasons that Hindus have swung strongly in the direction of (almost)being a majority vegetarian religion?

(Hindus are under 80% of India but the nation is 33%-41% vegetarian while it was only (at most) 15% vegetarian during the 18th century).

India has a humane and tolerant spirit.

Zoroastrians are an outside religion (though not seen as quite as foreign, and certainly not as hostile to India, like Muslims and Christians are seen) and very tiny yet there was a slight Zoroastrian strain in the 1980s leadership.

What other nation elects religious minorities?

They even elected a Prime Minister (2005-2014) who was a member of a small minority religion that had members that murdered the female Prime Minister just 21 years earlier.

And nevermind the fact that a female was elected leader (and one who married a Zoroastrian, and do remember that females marring a male of a different religion is seen as very wicked to most of the worlds religious people - especially Christians and Muslims).

The Hindu religion is enlightened and though it is a religion with shrinking numbers of followers, it will be the majority religion in the nation that will have the world's largest population (in 2022).

A positive sign for the world.

Let us be honest about it.

The national hero seems to be the pacifist & anti-nationalist Mahatma Gandhi , who happens to be an admirer or both Asoka and the Sermon on the Mount.


Replies to this message:
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ringo
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Posts: 15740
From: frozen wasteland
Joined: 03-23-2005
Member Rating: 1.7


Message 26 of 34 (837677)
08-07-2018 11:54 AM
Reply to: Message 25 by LamarkNewAge
08-07-2018 11:43 AM


Re: Look at examples of Indian religious flow.
LamarkNewAge writes:

Let us be honest about it.


Can we be honest in 25 words or less?

And our geese will blot out the sun.

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LamarkNewAge
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Posts: 1287
Joined: 12-22-2015
Member Rating: 1.1


Message 27 of 34 (837683)
08-07-2018 12:14 PM


Tolerance and the Hindu-Buddhist foundation of the nation India.
Here is a symbol of the tolerance enshrined into and a part of the fiber of the very nation India.

Nehru selected the Ashoka Chakra to be on the flag.

It has really does have roots all the way back to Ashoka.

quote:

On 14 July 1947, the committee recommended that the flag of the Indian National Congress be adopted as the National Flag of India with suitable modifications, so as to make it acceptable to all parties and communities. It was also resolved that the flag should not have any communal undertones.[5] The spinning wheel of the Congress flag was replaced by the Chakra (wheel) from the Lion Capital of Ashoka. According to Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, the chakra was chosen as it was representative of dharma and law. However, Jawaharlal Nehru explained that the change was more practical in nature, as unlike the flag with the spinning wheel, this design would appear symmetrical. Gandhi was not very pleased by the change, but eventually came around to accepting it.

The flag was proposed by Nehru at the Constituent Assembly on 22 July 1947 as a horizontal tricolour of deep saffron, white and dark green in equal proportions, with the Ashoka wheel in blue in the centre of the white band. Nehru also presented two flags, one in Khadi-silk and the other in Khadi-cotton, to the assembly. The resolution was approved unanimously.[28] It served as the national flag of the Dominion of India between 15 August 1947 and 26 January 1950, and has served as the flag of the Republic of India since then.[8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/India_flag


The State Emblem it is.

And the Lion Capital of Ashoka needs explanation (later).

quote:

The State Emblem of India, as the national emblem of India is called, is an adaptation of the Lion Capital of Ashoka at Sarnath, preserved in the Varanasi Sarnath Museum in India. A representation of Lion Capital of Ashoka was initially adopted as the emblem of the Dominion of India in December 1947.[1] The current version of the emblem was officially adopted on 26 January 1950, the day that India became a republic.

....

The emblem forms a part of the official letterhead of the Government of India and appears on all Indian currency as well. It also functions as the national emblem of India in many places and appears prominently on Indian passports. The Ashoka Chakra (wheel) on its base features in the centre of the national flag of India.

The usage of the emblem is regulated and restricted under State Emblem of India (Prohibition of Improper Use) Act, 2005. No individual or private organisation is permitted to use the emblem for official correspondence.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Emblem_of_India


The Lion Capital of Ashoka comes up again.

quote:

The Ashoka Chakra is a depiction of the dharmachakra; represented with 24 spokes. It is so called because it appears on a number of edicts of Ashoka, most prominent among which is the Lion Capital of Ashoka. The most visible use of the Ashoka Chakra today is at the centre of the Flag of India (adopted on 22 July 1947), where it is rendered in a navy blue colour on a white background, replacing the symbol of charkha (spinning wheel) of the pre-independence versions of the flag.

India's highest peacetime military decoration awarded for valour, courageous action or self-sacrifice away from the battlefield is also called Ashoka Chakra.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashoka_Chakra


Now this Lion Capital of Ashoka is explained.

quote:

The original Lion Capital. Minus the inverted bell-shaped lotus flower, this has been adopted as the National Emblem of India, seen from another angle, showing the horse on the left and the bull on the right of the Ashoka Chakra in the circular base on which the four Indian lions are standing back to back. On the side shown here there are the bull and elephant; a lion occupies the other place. The wheel "Ashoka Chakra" from its base has been placed onto the centre of the National Flag of India.

The Lion Capital of Ashoka is a sculpture of four Asiatic lions standing back to back, on an elaborate base that includes other animals. A graphic representation of it was adopted as the official Emblem of India in 1950.[1] It was originally placed atop the Ashoka pillar at the important Buddhist site of Sarnath by the Emperor Ashoka, in about 250 BCE.[2] The pillar, sometimes called the Aœoka Column, is still in its original location, but the Lion Capital is now in the Sarnath Museum, in the state of Uttar Pradesh, India. Standing 2.15 metres (7 feet) high including the base, it is more elaborate than the other very similar surviving capitals of the pillars of Ashoka bearing the Edicts of Ashoka that were placed throughout India several of which feature single animals at the top; one other damaged group of four lions survives, at Sanchi.[3]

The capital is carved out of a single block of polished sandstone, and was always a separate piece from the column itself. It features four Asiatic Lions standing back to back. They are mounted on an abacus with a frieze carrying sculptures in high relief of an elephant, a galloping horse, a bull, and a lion, separated by intervening spoked chariot-wheels. The whole sits upon a bell-shaped lotus. The capital was originally probably crowned by a 'Wheel of Dharma' (Dharmachakra popularly known in India as the "Ashoka Chakra"), with 24 spokes, of which a few fragments were found on the site.[4] A 13th-century replica of the Sarnath pillar and capital in Wat Umong near Chiang Mai, Thailand built by King Mangrai, preserves its crowning Ashoka Chakra or Dharmachakra.[5] The wheel on the capital, below the lions, is the model for the one in the flag of India.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lion_Capital_of_Ashoka


This Chakra (of Ashoka)design was placed on top an actual PILLAR BY ASHOKA IN 250 B.C.E. in Sarnath.

Here we have an actual design from the rule of Ashoka!

On top a pillar that had his edicts!

Here is an edict in Asoka's own words engraved as a commandment.

quote:

All religions should reside everywhere, for all of them desire self-control and purity of heart. Rock Edict Nb7 (S. Dhammika)

Here (in my domain) no living beings are to be slaughtered or offered in sacrifice. Rock Edict Nb1 (S. Dhammika)

Contact (between religions) is good. One should listen to and respect the doctrines professed by others. Beloved-Servant-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, desires that all should be well-learned in the good doctrines of other religions. Rock Edict Nb12 (S. Dhammika)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edicts_of_Ashoka


The fact is that tolerance is part of the very soul of India.

The largest nation in the word in LESS THAN 5 YEARS.


Replies to this message:
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Faith
Member
Posts: 30162
From: Nevada, USA
Joined: 10-06-2001
Member Rating: 1.2


Message 28 of 34 (837720)
08-07-2018 4:55 PM
Reply to: Message 22 by LamarkNewAge
08-07-2018 8:14 AM


Re: Why I like the Hindus.
Hinduism (and its off shoots) is perhaps the world's most tolerant religion.

Not toward Christians. I know an Indian pastor who says they have been increasing their persecutions recently. He's sent me videos of Christians lying injured and dead in the streets, bandaged up in the hospitals, a woman stripped naked being chased through the streets.

Hindus are fine with any religion that just adds another god to their millions, same as the old Roman paganism of the Caesars, but not at all happy if the religion is exclusivistic.

Here's Wikipedia onViolence Against Christians in India

Anti-Christian violence in India refers to religiously-motivated violence against Christians in India.[1] Violence against Christians has been seen by the organization Human Rights Watch as a tactic used to meet political ends.[1] The acts of violence include arson of churches, conversion of Christians by force and threats of physical violence, sexual assaults, murder of Christian priests and destruction of Christian schools, colleges, and cemeteries.[2][1]

In August 2017, the US Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) ranked India’s persecution severity at “Tier 2” along with Iraq and Afghanistan.[3] In the past six years,[when?] India has risen from No. 31 to No. 11 on Open Doors' World Watch List, ranking just behind Iran in persecution severity.[4][5]

You should differentiate between Roman Catholicism and Christianity in general if you are talking about their propensity to violence. The RC Church is famous for its Inquisition and other forms of violence. And of course so is Islam.


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Chiroptera
Member
Posts: 6531
From: Oklahoma
Joined: 09-28-2003
Member Rating: 3.6


(1)
Message 29 of 34 (837723)
08-07-2018 5:34 PM
Reply to: Message 27 by LamarkNewAge
08-07-2018 12:14 PM


Re: Tolerance and the Hindu-Buddhist foundation of the nation India.
Someone would have had to have been ignoring the news in the last couple of decades to not be aware of the Hindu-on-Muslim violence in India. The anti-Muslim riots in Gujarat a decade and a half ago was a major news story, and the news constantly has stories of Hindu-on-Muslim riots and lynchings.

Currently, "cow vigilantism" is a big thing in India, where a non-Hindu, usually a Muslim, is accused of slaughtering a cow and lynched.

Christans have also been victims of Hindu extremist violence, as Faith has mentioned.

-

And of course much of the terrorism in Sri Lanka is due to Buddhist extremists, and in Chinese history Buddhist and Taoists were guilty of violence against each other. And let's not forget the warrior samurai caste of Japan was predominantly Buddhist; shinto was considered the religion of the peasants. (This was, ironically, turned around in the historical mythology promoted by the Showa era militarists).

-

Every religion has the seeds (and a history) of violent intolerance. Every religion has the seeds (and a history) of peaceful coexistence. Whether any religion is "peaceful" or "violent" has more to do with the socio-economics of a particular region than it does of a broad and diverse religion. That is why every group should be judged on its particular teachings, not on the religious label put on it. Every person should be judge on their particular actions, not on the religious label it chooses.



Oh, God! Pride of Man, broken in the dust again! -- Quicksilver Messenger Service

This message is a reply to:
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NoNukes
Inactive Member


Message 30 of 34 (837724)
08-07-2018 5:39 PM
Reply to: Message 22 by LamarkNewAge
08-07-2018 8:14 AM


Re: Why I like the Hindus.
I have read your post and I still have no idea what your complaint is about.

Hinduism (and its off shoots) is perhaps the world's most tolerant religion.

Okay...


Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

We got a thousand points of light for the homeless man. We've got a kinder, gentler, machine gun hand. Neil Young, Rockin' in the Free World.

Worrying about the "browning of America" is not racism. -- Faith

I hate you all, you hate me -- Faith

No it is based on math I studied in sixth grade, just plain old addition, substraction and multiplication. -- ICANT


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