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Author Topic:   misc lexeme morpholgy and semantic theory
Rob 
Suspended Member (Idle past 2129 days)
Posts: 2297
Joined: 06-01-2006


Message 1 of 85 (36118)
04-02-2003 5:21 PM


Edited as of post #7
'theo' 'theory' 'theology'

Round 1

I am trying to make the case that the word 'Thoery' has the same meaning as 'theology' because of it's etymological roots.

I want to focus on the Greek meaning, because one derivitive (θεωρός) is the equivalent of the Latin meaning.

English is attested since 1613, from Latin theoria (Jerome), from Greek θεωρία "contemplation, speculation", from θεωρός "spectator," literally "one looking at a show", from *θεᾱ+ϝορός > θε(ε)ωρός.
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory )

If we go to a Greek-English dictionary we find that 'θεωρία' translates as follows: θεωρία = contemplation, speculation, theoretics, theory, view
theoria

( http://www.kypros.org/cgi-bin/lexicon )

Main Entry: the·o·ry
Pronunciation: 'thE-&-rE, 'thir-E
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural -ries
Etymology: Late Latin theoria, from Greek theOria, from theOrein

( http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/theory )

'thea' vs. 'theo' in the greek:
theoi -- noun; nominative plural masculine of god -- gods
theôn -- noun; genitive plural masculine of god -- of the gods

thea -- noun; vocative singular feminine of goddess -- O goddess

theaôn -- noun; genitive plural feminine of goddess -- among the goddesses

( http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/lrc/eieol/grkol-2-R.html )

Regardless of whether one uses the word 'theo' or 'thea', it is in fact, rooted in the concept of God. From there, the morphology and etymology begins. And we do not seperate the morphological and etymological applications of the term from the term itself. The lexeme is undeniable. If 'theo' is simply 'spectating' or 'a view' as you are attempting to maintain, then where does the 'emperical or logical quality' come in?

What is it that we are viewing?

It comes in by keeping in mind the logical (Logos / reason) and contemplative aspects of the lexeme, in addition to it's aspect of simple observation. We cannot seperate the viewing from what it is that is being viewed. And in the sense of the sciences we are viewing reality.

As I said before, a difference in relationship between the 'theology' of God, and the 'theory' of some aspect of reality, is purely one of contemplating reality's ultimate nature, be it living and relational or simply an indifferent material force.

What is certain, is that in spite of any difference in form, they do not amount to a total or practical difference; rather, they are different forms of the same lexeme. Both represent an abstract construct or methodology thought and expected to be logical, consistent, reflective, and illuminating of reality. To focus on the latin ('a view' + 'to see') aspect of the morphology of the word 'theory' is to deny the Greek ('contemplation, speculation, theoretics, theory, view theoria') meaning of the term which captures better the english meaning of the word.

It is also certain that our theory (or theology) of God (or reality) is accompanied, or used in conjunction with, concepts that are akin to sight, viewing, seeing and watching; as in a theatre or show. Hence the morphology of the lexeme; incorporating the many characteristics that flow from such a contemplative and significant term know as 'theo'.

'Theory', like 'theology', is a word with theistic roots and tied inexorably to the concept of the ultimate reality irrespective of it's actual nature. All philosophcal constructs or mathematical postulates of reality are the same in this regard. It matters not if they are 'theistic', 'atheisict', pantheistic, agnostic, secular, etc. All take a position on the concept of the supreme, or ultimate reality, assuming it to be true and real regardless of whether they choose to address the 'whole' or 'ultimate scope' of reality, either by saying that we cannot know what God (or reality) is; or by saying that this current world (and understanding of it) is the only knowledge or understanding worthy of consideration and any 'ultimate scope' or wider theory is unpractical or irrelevant. They've still addressed 'the issue', by ultimately giving their own postulate or theory (philosophy) of life and reality.

And yes... God is synonymous with reality:
Main Entry: 1 god
Pronunciation: 'gäd also 'god
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German got god
1 capitalized : the supreme or ultimate reality:
( http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/god )

In a previous thread ( www.evcforum.net/cgi-bin/dm.cgi?action=msg&f=13&t=83&m=121#131 -->www.evcforum.net/cgi-bin/dm.cgi?action=msg&f=13&t=83&m=121#131">http://www.evcforum.net/cgi-bin/dm.cgi?action=msg&f=13&t=83&m=121#131), Kuresu provided a link that makes this plain: http://orgtheory.wordpress.com/2006/07/11/etymology-of-theory/

It follows:

etymology of theory
July 11th, 2006
Teppo

From Online Etymology Dictionary:

1592, “conception, mental scheme,” from L.L. theoria (Jerome), from Gk. theoria “contemplation, speculation, a looking at, things looked at,” from theorein “to consider, speculate, look at,” from theoros “spectator,” from thea “a view” + horan “to see.” Sense of “principles or methods of a science or art (rather than its practice)” is first recorded 1613. That of “an explanation based on observation and reasoning” is from 1638. The verb theorize is recorded from 1638.

From Wikipedia:

The word ‘theory’ derives from the Greek ‘theorein’, which means ‘to look at’. According to some sources, it was used frequently in terms of ‘looking at’ a theatre stage, which may explain why sometimes the word ‘theory’ is used as something provisional or not completely resembling real. The term ‘theoria’ (a noun) was already used by the scholars of ancient Greece. Theorein is built upon ‘to theion’ (the divine) or ‘to theia’ (divine things) ‘orao’ (I see), ie ‘contemplate the divine’. ‘Divine’ was understood as harmony and order (or logos) permeating the real world surrounding us.

Edited by Rob, : No reason given.

Edited by Rob, : No reason given.


    
Admin
Director
Posts: 11388
From: EvC Forum
Joined: 06-14-2002
Member Rating: 1.0


Message 2 of 85 (413173)
07-29-2007 3:15 PM


Bringing this thread back to the present...
Enjoy!


--Percy
EvC Forum Director

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Rob 
Suspended Member (Idle past 2129 days)
Posts: 2297
Joined: 06-01-2006


Message 3 of 85 (413194)
07-29-2007 5:10 PM
Reply to: Message 2 by Admin
07-29-2007 3:15 PM


Re: Bringing this thread back to the present...
Thanks... and thanks for doing all the work to keep things running. I appriciated it more when it was down...

Guess that makes me a boot-licker? :o

How about promoting the topic?


This message is a reply to:
 Message 2 by Admin, posted 07-29-2007 3:15 PM Admin has not yet responded

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Adminastasia
Inactive Member


Message 4 of 85 (413220)
07-29-2007 8:55 PM
Reply to: Message 3 by Rob
07-29-2007 5:10 PM


Re: Bringing this thread back to the present...
Hi Rob,

I am willing to put this in Coffee House. I am hoping to keep things more on topic by allowing you the appropriate place to hash things out.

I would prefer if the topic wasn't a continuation of the talk with kuresu, and maybe I can coerce you into removing those references, and just presenting the word 'theory' as the first word for 'study'. You don't have to put all your eggs in the first basket you find. :)

I will wait for your final changes, and give the other admins a chance to protest.

Edited by Adminastasia, : No reason given.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 3 by Rob, posted 07-29-2007 5:10 PM Rob has responded

Replies to this message:
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 Message 7 by Rob, posted 07-30-2007 9:01 PM Adminastasia has responded

  
AdminBuzsaw
Inactive Member


Message 5 of 85 (413222)
07-29-2007 9:21 PM
Reply to: Message 4 by Adminastasia
07-29-2007 8:55 PM


Re: Bringing this thread back to the present...
Adminastasia writes:

You don't have to put all your eggs in the first basket you find.

I agree, great call, Adminastasia. Too much in this basket, for sure.

Edited by AdminBuzsaw, : No reason given.


For ideological balance on the EvC admin team as a Biblical creationist.
This message is a reply to:
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Rob 
Suspended Member (Idle past 2129 days)
Posts: 2297
Joined: 06-01-2006


Message 6 of 85 (413412)
07-30-2007 8:29 PM
Reply to: Message 4 by Adminastasia
07-29-2007 8:55 PM


Re: Bringing this thread back to the present...
I get the impression that people think I am impatient and prideful or something... :D

I might need some time. This week is very busy at work. I already have 18 hrs in and it's only monday. And next week is a longa awaited family vacation.

But your suggestion is realistic. It's has become far too personal between Kuresu and I. I accept responsibility for that ,since it seems to happen with everyone and not just him. I'll do my part...

Just give me a couple weeks. I might get it done this week...


This message is a reply to:
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Rob 
Suspended Member (Idle past 2129 days)
Posts: 2297
Joined: 06-01-2006


Message 7 of 85 (413417)
07-30-2007 9:01 PM
Reply to: Message 4 by Adminastasia
07-29-2007 8:55 PM


Definition of words
How's this Adminastasia?

'theo' 'theory' 'theology'

Round 1

I am trying to make the case that the word 'Thoery' has the same meaning as 'theology' because of it's etymological roots.

I want to focus on the Greek meaning, because one derivitive (θεωρός) is the equivalent of the Latin meaning.

English is attested since 1613, from Latin theoria (Jerome), from Greek θεωρία "contemplation, speculation", from θεωρός "spectator," literally "one looking at a show", from *θεᾱ+ϝορός > θε(ε)ωρός.
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory )

If we go to a Greek-English dictionary we find that 'θεωρία' translates as follows: θεωρία = contemplation, speculation, theoretics, theory, view
theoria

( http://www.kypros.org/cgi-bin/lexicon )

Main Entry: the·o·ry
Pronunciation: 'thE-&-rE, 'thir-E
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural -ries
Etymology: Late Latin theoria, from Greek theOria, from theOrein

( http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/theory )

'thea' vs. 'theo' in the greek:
theoi -- noun; nominative plural masculine of god -- gods
theôn -- noun; genitive plural masculine of god -- of the gods

thea -- noun; vocative singular feminine of goddess -- O goddess

theaôn -- noun; genitive plural feminine of goddess -- among the goddesses

( http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/lrc/eieol/grkol-2-R.html )

Regardless of whether one uses the word 'theo' or 'thea', it is in fact, rooted in the concept of God. From there, the morphology and etymology begins. And we do not seperate the morphological and etymological applications of the term from the term itself. The lexeme is undeniable. If 'theo' is simply 'spectating' or 'a view' as you are attempting to maintain, then where does the 'emperical or logical quality' come in?

What is it that we are viewing?

It comes in by keeping in mind the logical (Logos / reason) and contemplative aspects of the lexeme, in addition to it's aspect of simple observation. We cannot seperate the viewing from what it is that is being viewed. And in the sense of the sciences we are viewing reality.

As I said before, a difference in relationship between the 'theology' of God, and the 'theory' of some aspect of reality, is purely one of contemplating reality's ultimate nature, be it living and relational or simply an indifferent material force.

What is certain, is that in spite of any difference in form, they do not amount to a total or practical difference; rather, they are different forms of the same lexeme. Both represent an abstract construct or methodology thought and expected to be logical, consistent, reflective, and illuminating of reality. To focus on the latin ('a view' + 'to see') aspect of the morphology of the word 'theory' is to deny the Greek ('contemplation, speculation, theoretics, theory, view theoria') meaning of the term which captures better the english meaning of the word.

It is also certain that our theory (or theology) of God (or reality) is accompanied, or used in conjunction with, concepts that are akin to sight, viewing, seeing and watching; as in a theatre or show. Hence the morphology of the lexeme; incorporating the many characteristics that flow from such a contemplative and significant term know as 'theo'.

'Theory', like 'theology', is a word with theistic roots and tied inexorably to the concept of the ultimate reality irrespective of it's actual nature. All philosophcal constructs or mathematical postulates of reality are the same in this regard. It matters not if they are 'theistic', 'atheisict', pantheistic, agnostic, secular, etc. All take a position on the concept of the supreme, or ultimate reality, assuming it to be true and real regardless of whether they choose to address the 'whole' or 'ultimate scope' of reality, either by saying that we cannot know what God (or reality) is; or by saying that this current world (and understanding of it) is the only knowledge or understanding worthy of consideration and any 'ultimate scope' or wider theory is unpractical or irrelevant. They've still addressed 'the issue', by ultimately giving their own postulate or theory (philosophy) of life and reality.

And yes... God is synonymous with reality:
Main Entry: 1 god
Pronunciation: 'gäd also 'god
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German got god
1 capitalized : the supreme or ultimate reality:
( http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/god )

In a previous thread ( www.evcforum.net/cgi-bin/dm.cgi?action=msg&f=13&t=83&m=121#131 -->www.evcforum.net/cgi-bin/dm.cgi?action=msg&f=13&t=83&m=121#131">http://www.evcforum.net/cgi-bin/dm.cgi?action=msg&f=13&t=83&m=121#131), Kuresu provided a link that makes this plain: http://orgtheory.wordpress.com/2006/07/11/etymology-of-theory/

It follows:

etymology of theory
July 11th, 2006
Teppo

From Online Etymology Dictionary:

1592, “conception, mental scheme,” from L.L. theoria (Jerome), from Gk. theoria “contemplation, speculation, a looking at, things looked at,” from theorein “to consider, speculate, look at,” from theoros “spectator,” from thea “a view” + horan “to see.” Sense of “principles or methods of a science or art (rather than its practice)” is first recorded 1613. That of “an explanation based on observation and reasoning” is from 1638. The verb theorize is recorded from 1638.

From Wikipedia:

The word ‘theory’ derives from the Greek ‘theorein’, which means ‘to look at’. According to some sources, it was used frequently in terms of ‘looking at’ a theatre stage, which may explain why sometimes the word ‘theory’ is used as something provisional or not completely resembling real. The term ‘theoria’ (a noun) was already used by the scholars of ancient Greece. Theorein is built upon ‘to theion’ (the divine) or ‘to theia’ (divine things) ‘orao’ (I see), ie ‘contemplate the divine’. ‘Divine’ was understood as harmony and order (or logos) permeating the real world surrounding us.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 4 by Adminastasia, posted 07-29-2007 8:55 PM Adminastasia has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 8 by Adminastasia, posted 07-30-2007 10:08 PM Rob has responded
 Message 10 by arachnophilia, posted 07-30-2007 10:25 PM Rob has responded
 Message 15 by PaulK, posted 07-31-2007 2:58 AM Rob has responded

    
Adminastasia
Inactive Member


Message 8 of 85 (413441)
07-30-2007 10:08 PM
Reply to: Message 7 by Rob
07-30-2007 9:01 PM


Re: Definition of words
Dear Rob, it is far too long.

You don't have to write everything at once. Mention that you want to discuss the word 'theory', and let the trial begin. All the evidence does not need to be presented in the opening statement.

I don't care how personal things are with kuresu, but the point is that anyone reading a thread for the first time should be able to follow the train of thought without past references to people who may or may not still be here. A thread should not be contingent upon one person's participation, and if it is, it should be a GD. I don't want this to be a GD, it is not worth it. I would only be willing to do one thread for random semantics in Coffee House.

I want to give you one exemption before your vacation, and promote, but I really think we could do without the 'God is reality' etc., and stick to the first few sentences.

ABE; OK, I am doing it just this once :) as is, since others seem willing to participate.

Edited by Adminastasia, : No reason given.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 7 by Rob, posted 07-30-2007 9:01 PM Rob has responded

Replies to this message:
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Adminastasia
Inactive Member


Message 9 of 85 (413446)
07-30-2007 10:15 PM


Thread moved here from the Proposed New Topics forum.
  
arachnophilia
Member
Posts: 8959
From: god's waiting room
Joined: 05-21-2004
Member Rating: 2.7


Message 10 of 85 (413452)
07-30-2007 10:25 PM
Reply to: Message 7 by Rob
07-30-2007 9:01 PM


I am trying to make the case that the word 'Thoery' has the same meaning as 'theology' because of it's etymological roots.

since you called me in from another thread.

it appears that thea (to view) and thea (the feminine of theos) are merely homonyms.

thea is the root of words like "theatre" and "theory." theos is the root of words like "theology" and "atheist."

theoria and theorein seem to be different words that wikipedia has conflated.

even as such, it is generally poor practice to try to equate words based on etymological roots. the usage and accepted definitions are much more important. even then, the historical usage may not mean much about the modern usage -- lots of secular things have religious origins and vice-versa.


אָרַח

This message is a reply to:
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Replies to this message:
 Message 11 by anastasia, posted 07-30-2007 10:39 PM arachnophilia has responded
 Message 13 by Rob, posted 07-31-2007 1:28 AM arachnophilia has responded

  
anastasia
Member (Idle past 2233 days)
Posts: 1857
From: Bucks County, PA
Joined: 11-05-2006


Message 11 of 85 (413460)
07-30-2007 10:39 PM
Reply to: Message 10 by arachnophilia
07-30-2007 10:25 PM


This is my only contribution:

Thea was the Goddess of sight. At some time, the word 'thea' may have become synonymous with 'viewing'. If that is true, then one must distinguish a difference between words which have this derivitive as a root, and words which use 'thea' in the form of a god or goddess concept.

I can not answer why the masculine 'theos' appears to be used in 'theory' except that perhaps in the original Greek the word itself calls for the masculine.

Edited by anastasia, : No reason given.

Edited by anastasia, : No reason given.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 10 by arachnophilia, posted 07-30-2007 10:25 PM arachnophilia has responded

Replies to this message:
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arachnophilia
Member
Posts: 8959
From: god's waiting room
Joined: 05-21-2004
Member Rating: 2.7


Message 12 of 85 (413461)
07-30-2007 10:47 PM
Reply to: Message 11 by anastasia
07-30-2007 10:39 PM


Thea was the Goddess of sight. At some time, the word 'thea' may have become synonymous with 'viewing'. If that is true, then one must distinguish a difference between words which have this derivitive as a root, and words which use 'thea' in the form of a god or goddess concept.

indeed.

I can not answer why the masculine 'theos' appears to be used in 'theory' except that perhaps in the original Greek the word itself calls for the masculine

oh, because only the "the-" part comes from thea. the "-ory" part comes from horan.

Edited by arachnophilia, : No reason given.


אָרַח

This message is a reply to:
 Message 11 by anastasia, posted 07-30-2007 10:39 PM anastasia has not yet responded

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Rob 
Suspended Member (Idle past 2129 days)
Posts: 2297
Joined: 06-01-2006


Message 13 of 85 (413472)
07-31-2007 1:28 AM
Reply to: Message 10 by arachnophilia
07-30-2007 10:25 PM


Arachnophilia:
it appears that thea (to view) and thea (the feminine of theos) are merely homonyms.

thea is the root of words like "theatre" and "theory." theos is the root of words like "theology" and "atheist."

Is this a test of my knowledge of languges? I am very suprised by this criticism of yours. I don't think Wiki has conflated anything. These particular terms are indivisible.

Consider:

In linguistics, a homonym is one of a group of words that share the same spelling or pronunciation (or both) but have different meanings. The state of being a homonym is called homonymy. Examples of homonyms are stalk (which can mean either part of a plant or to follow someone around) and the trio of words to, too and two (actually, to, to, too, too and two, being "for the purpose of" as in "to make it easier", the opposite of "from", also, excessively, and "2", respectively). Some sources state that homonym meanings must be unrelated in origin (rather than just different). Thus right (correct) and right (opposed to left) would be polysemous (see below) and not be homonyms.
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homonym )

As you said yourself, "it appears that thea (to view) and thea (the feminine of theos) are merely homonyms."

If 'thea' is the feminine of 'theos', how can they be homonyms? They have the same meaning (gods).

Don't forget:

Anastasia:
Thea was the Goddess of sight. At some time, the word 'thea' may have become synonymous with 'viewing'. If that is true, then one must distinguish a difference between words which have this derivitive as a root, and words which use 'thea' in the form of a god or goddess concept.

Arachnophilia: indeed.

Edited by Rob, : No reason given.


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Replies to this message:
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Rob 
Suspended Member (Idle past 2129 days)
Posts: 2297
Joined: 06-01-2006


Message 14 of 85 (413475)
07-31-2007 1:54 AM
Reply to: Message 8 by Adminastasia
07-30-2007 10:08 PM


Re: Definition of words
Adminastasia:
You don't have to write everything at once. Mention that you want to discuss the word 'theory', and let the trial begin. All the evidence does not need to be presented in the opening statement.

I don't care how personal things are with kuresu, but the point is that anyone reading a thread for the first time should be able to follow the train of thought without past references to people who may or may not still be here. A thread should not be contingent upon one person's participation, and if it is, it should be a GD. I don't want this to be a GD, it is not worth it. I would only be willing to do one thread for random semantics in Coffee House.

I want to give you one exemption before your vacation, and promote, but I really think we could do without the 'God is reality' etc., and stick to the first few sentences.

I appriciate your comments. I can only say that many of the arguments had already been evolving in the other threads. Mostly, Kuresu and I were both trying to get a handle on the reality of the etymology, and I think we began by grasping at straws. I had to really think about this one and not rely on my intuition alone. It was pretty puzzling for a few hours.

As for the invoking of 'reality' and it's realtionship to God... it is an essential part of my argument. Without that connection, I have no case. And it is an essential point that is so very muched missed and taken for granted. That was Paul Davies whole point. Reason (logos) itself is exalted by faith. And I think we would all agree and rightly so.

Perhaps now is a good time to re-insert that argument:


Paul Davies, theoretical physicist / Australian Centre for Astrobiology

Davies on the question: ‘Does the monotheistic tradition of an intelligible universe have any impact on modern science?’

“The worldview of a scientist, even the most atheistic scientist, is that essentially of Monotheism. It is a belief, which is accepted as an article of faith, that the universe is ordered in an intelligible way.

Now, you couldn’t be a scientist if you didn’t believe these two things. If you didn’t think there was an underlying order in nature, you wouldn’t bother to do it, because there is nothing to be found. And if you didn’t believe it was intelligible, you’d give up because there is no point if human beings can’t come to understand it.

But scientists do, as a matter of faith, accept that the universe is ordered and at least partially intelligible to human beings. And that is what underpins the entire scientific enterprise. And that is a theological position. It is absolutely ‘theo’ when you look at history. It comes from a theological worldview.

That doesn’t mean you have to buy into the religion, or buy into the theology, but it is very, very significant in historical terms; that that is where it comes from and that scientists today, unshakably retain that worldview, as an act of faith. You cannot prove it logically has to be the case, that the universe is rational and intelligible. It could easily have been otherwise. It could have been arbitrary, it could have been absurd, it could have been utterly beyond human comprehension. It’s not! And scientists just take this for granted for the most part, and I think it’s a really important point that needs to be made.”

All in all, thank you for promoting the topic. I don't mind laying all the cards out. If there is nothing left to be said, then we can not waste disk space on irrelevant debate. And alot of that was occuring as I raised the issue and tried to bring people's attention to the fact that 'theory' is essentially a 'seeing faith'. There was really only one objection. I'd like to be able to move on, set the precident here, and be able to point back to this precident if the question is raised again.

In my opinion, the negative reaction to calling theory 'faith' is not because that is a false charge, but because it is based upon people's misconception that 'all faith' is blind faith.

Some faith is blind. Not mine... and not that of the scientific community. Because ultimately, irrespective of experience and hard facts, we rely upon the only tool we have with which to make sense of life and it's many clues; that tool... is logic.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 8 by Adminastasia, posted 07-30-2007 10:08 PM Adminastasia has not yet responded

    
PaulK
Member
Posts: 10476
Joined: 01-10-2003
Member Rating: 2.4


Message 15 of 85 (413479)
07-31-2007 2:58 AM
Reply to: Message 7 by Rob
07-30-2007 9:01 PM


Re: Definition of words
quote:

I am trying to make the case that the word 'Thoery' has the same meaning as 'theology' because of it's etymological roots.

There are two things very badly wrong with this. The first is that the etymological roots do not and cannot dictate current usage. THe second is that the etymological roots provide no support whatsoever for that assertion as you already know.

quote:

I want to focus on the Greek meaning, because one derivitive (θεωρός) is the equivalent of the Latin meaning.

That would be MODERN Greek usage because you used a MODERN Greek dictionary. The sie you used does have an option to search for Ancient Greek words - but "theoria" is not included. You can't work out etymology by relying on modern readings for the same reason that you can't use etymology to dictate modern meanings. Word usage changes over time.

quote:

Regardless of whether one uses the word 'theo' or 'thea', it is in fact, rooted in the concept of God. From there, the morphology and etymology begins. And we do not seperate the morphological and etymological applications of the term from the term itself. The lexeme is undeniable. If 'theo' is simply 'spectating' or 'a view' as you are attempting to maintain, then where does the 'emperical or logical quality' come in?

i.e. since all you have is a morphological resemblance you want to use that to dictate the etymology just as you want to use the etymology to dictate the meanings.

Unfortunately if you look for the word "theo" on the University of Texas site you quoted, it does not mean" God" (that is "theos") - it means "run". Base Form Dictionary. Judging by your past record you'll probably drop the morphology argument now...

The rest of your argument essentially states that you view God as reality and therefore all statements about reality are statements about God. This move allows you to classify all statements about reality as "theology" unfortunately it cannot prove your case. Your pantheism is your personal view - and one that is not shared by a majority of people. To everyone else who recognises a distinction between God and physical reality (including those who believe that there is no God) your argument simply does not work. The distinction between science and theology is useful to the majority of people (including theologians !) and thus it will be maintained.

Likewise the distinction between "theory" and "theology" would be maintained since "theology" would cover the entire field of study while "theory" would refer to a narrower body of work - just as it does today.

But still I thank you for this post because it demonstrates the lengths that some creationists will got to to avoid admitting that they are wrong. Any sensible person would simply have looked up the meanings and admitted error. Or indeed not made such an obviously false claim in the first place. You on the other hand prefer to discard the facts and appeal to etymology as if that could override the meaning. When that fails you say that we should ignore the etymology and appeal to morphology as if that dictated etymology. And you back all that up by attempting to declare pantheism true by fiat ! And even that doesn't prove your case.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 7 by Rob, posted 07-30-2007 9:01 PM Rob has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 18 by Rob, posted 07-31-2007 3:18 AM PaulK has responded

    
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