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Author Topic:   Transistion from biology to machinery
Loudmouth
Inactive Member


Message 4 of 8 (98509)
04-07-2004 6:20 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by Brad
01-26-2004 10:21 PM


quote:
would it not be possible for a machine to evolve exponentially faster with only 1 and 0?

My first instinct is that they would evolve slower. With more options per "base" the more possibilities there are. If you are limited to two choices it would seem that there is less possible variation. Of course, this all depends on how the sequence is used, such as codon reading in transcription of mRNA. I would say that a binary set would have less "informational content" than a DNA sequence of the same length. This is just speculation, I am sure others have a more informed opinion.


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 Message 1 by Brad, posted 01-26-2004 10:21 PM Brad has not yet responded

  
Loudmouth
Inactive Member


Message 8 of 8 (133643)
08-13-2004 4:15 PM
Reply to: Message 6 by NosyNed
08-13-2004 2:33 PM


Re: A side point.
quote:
A AI capable of doing it's own "artificial" selection based on recongnizing something smarter would qualify.

That is a great idea, if you ask me. Researching genetic algorithms I came across this article. The investigators allowed random connections between different electrical switches, transistors, etc. The selection pressure was towards evolving a circuit that produced an oscillating signal. Therefore, each time this ability was improved part of the circuit was preserved and new combinations were added. By the end the scientists had a fully functioning oscillating circuit. However, the most stunning part was that the circuit actually relied on a form of parasitism. Instead of actually producing the oscillating current, the circuit used a long run of copper wire in the circuit board to recieve oscillating radio frequencies from surrounding computers. Voila, the radio was accidently reinvented throught the process of variation and selection. Quite a stunning example of how evolutionary algorithms can come up with strategies that seem counter-intuitive but still work, just as we see in nature.

As to developing AI, the same process could probably be used. The exciting part is that evolutionary algorithms usually come up with solutions that humans would not have thought of, which makes this field a very rich resource for designing circuits and software. However, without the correct selective pressures we may end up with results that do not meet our starting criteria, as was seen in the example above. I think it is very possible that AI could be evolved, but it may come down to fine tuning the selective pressures and the source of variation.this article/url. The investigators allowed random connections between different electrical switches, transistors, etc. The selection pressure was towards evolving a circuit that produced an oscillating signal. Therefore, each time this ability was improved part of the circuit was preserved and new combinations were added. By the end the scientists had a fully functioning oscillating circuit. However, the most stunning part was that the circuit actually relied on a form of parasitism. Instead of actually producing the oscillating current, the circuit used a long run of copper wire in the circuit board to recieve oscillating radio frequencies from surrounding computers. Voila, the radio was accidently reinvented throught the process of variation and selection. Quite a stunning example of how evolutionary algorithms can come up with strategies that seem counter-intuitive but still work, just as we see in nature.
This message has been edited by Loudmouth, 08-13-2004 03:15 PM

This message has been edited by Loudmouth, 08-13-2004 03:16 PM


This message is a reply to:
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