Register | Sign In


Understanding through Discussion


EvC Forum active members: 50 (9179 total)
1 online now:
Newest Member: Jorge Parker
Post Volume: Total: 918,208 Year: 5,465/9,624 Month: 490/323 Week: 130/204 Day: 0/4 Hour: 0/0


Thread  Details

Email This Thread
Newer Topic | Older Topic
  
Author Topic:   Evolution Logic
Chronos
Member (Idle past 6339 days)
Posts: 102
From: Macomb, Mi, USA
Joined: 10-23-2005


Message 4 of 302 (313860)
05-20-2006 10:29 AM
Reply to: Message 1 by dorkfrommarn
05-19-2006 6:18 AM


Anyway one time I was trying to put evolution in a logical perspective. Well I was wondering why we evolve in the first place. I could think of a couple answers. They were: need, curiosity, and want for perfection, which is sort of falls into the second category.
Evolution occurs because lifeforms are imperfect replicators who sometimes die before they can reproduce.
There is no 'need' for evolution, it's just something that occurs.
Evolution acts on pupulations, which have no desires or curiosities.

This message is a reply to:
 Message 1 by dorkfrommarn, posted 05-19-2006 6:18 AM dorkfrommarn has not replied

Chronos
Member (Idle past 6339 days)
Posts: 102
From: Macomb, Mi, USA
Joined: 10-23-2005


Message 13 of 302 (314110)
05-21-2006 10:02 AM
Reply to: Message 5 by dorkfrommarn
05-20-2006 12:09 PM


Re: Need, want or curiosity
Chronos,
Are you saying that evolution occurs for no reason?
No, I gave the reasons why evolution occurs.

This message is a reply to:
 Message 5 by dorkfrommarn, posted 05-20-2006 12:09 PM dorkfrommarn has not replied

Replies to this message:
 Message 21 by 2ice_baked_taters, posted 06-04-2006 5:31 AM Chronos has not replied

Chronos
Member (Idle past 6339 days)
Posts: 102
From: Macomb, Mi, USA
Joined: 10-23-2005


Message 14 of 302 (314112)
05-21-2006 10:12 AM
Reply to: Message 12 by dorkfrommarn
05-21-2006 9:40 AM


Re: Need, want or curiosity
So I am asking about a situation where changing from one species to another would benefit better than in-species yet still allow enough time for it to work
All that will happen from one generation to another are small changes. You're never going to see a "horse giving birth to a duck" type situation. If an isolated group of beavers that live in a cold environment are more likely to survive with thick fur and develop thick coats over a few thousand generations, we might classify them as a new species.
For the record, scientists have documented quite a few (at least several hundred) instances of speciation/macroevolution occuring.

This message is a reply to:
 Message 12 by dorkfrommarn, posted 05-21-2006 9:40 AM dorkfrommarn has not replied

Newer Topic | Older Topic
Jump to:


Copyright 2001-2023 by EvC Forum, All Rights Reserved

™ Version 4.2
Innovative software from Qwixotic © 2024