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Author Topic:   Daddy, is God real?
Peg
Member (Idle past 3094 days)
Posts: 2703
From: melbourne, australia
Joined: 11-22-2008


Message 31 of 34 (533013)
10-28-2009 5:43 AM
Reply to: Message 29 by caffeine
10-28-2009 4:56 AM


Re: Pagan roots of festivals
caffine writes:

This said, I honestly doubt that God would mind. If your purpose is to celebrate the birth of Christ, he'd surely be aware of that and appreciate the intention. It always seemed deeply unfair to me as a child that whilst the Muslims, Hindus and irreligious alike all joined in at Christmas, the Jehovah's Witness kids weren't allowed.

What would you think if God asked for one thing, but you gave him another?
Do you think he would mind if he continually got something he didnt aske for? I would get pretty annoyed after a couple of thousand years.

The reason i pose this question is because Jesus asked christians to memorialize his death. He didnt ask for his birth to be celebrated, he didnt ask for his resurrection to be celebrated. What the diciples celebrated was the death of christ.

“I received from the Lord that which I also handed on to you, that the Lord Jesus in the night in which he was going to be handed over took a loaf and, after giving thanks, he broke it and said: ‘This means my body which is in your behalf. Keep doing this in remembrance of me.’ He did likewise respecting the cup also, after he had the evening meal, saying: ‘This cup means the new covenant by virtue of my blood. Keep doing this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.’”—1 Corinthians 11:23-25.

The important celebration that JW's hold is the memorial of christs death. Its held every year after sundown on the date that corresponds to Nisan 14 on the jewish calander. This is the night that Jesus died and its what he wanted us to celebrate. His death is what makes all the promises of God possible.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 29 by caffeine, posted 10-28-2009 4:56 AM caffeine has not yet responded

    
onifre
Member (Idle past 1115 days)
Posts: 4854
From: Dark Side of the Moon
Joined: 02-20-2008


Message 32 of 34 (533040)
10-28-2009 10:33 AM
Reply to: Message 30 by Peg
10-28-2009 5:25 AM


Re: Thanks for the tips
Our celebrations are our public holidays, Australia Day (1st landings in australia), Anzac Day (war), Queens Birthday, Easter, Christmas & the Melbourne Cup (horserace)

And as a JW you're not allowed to celebrate any?

thats true...interestingly JW's dont vote in politics.

Really? I didn't know that. I knew you didn't serve in the military (but enjoy the freedom provided by it ) but I didn't know you didn't vote. Hell I don't blame you. lol

i have looked into it here are some quotes:

Fair enough, you looked into it, but you seem to only side with the evidence that supports your opinion, and ignored the other evidence that contradicts it.

It didnt matter that Jesus was not born in December but they likely saw it as a way to be accepted by the pagans...or as a way to turn the pagans attention away from their own religions.

Curiously, what are you caling "pagans"...?

The definition of pagan would include any religion that isn't Abrahamic. So there isn't a group of "pagans" practicing "paganism".

Like I said, it was common to have winter festivals in all cultures. Once these festivals spread around to other nations, they then add their touch to it. So the origin of Easter or Christmas becomes vague and changes from culture to culture.

But this I guess is taking it too off-topic.

I understand that Easter is to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. Yet the customs that go along with Easter have very little do do with Christ, ie hot cross buns, eggs, rabbits, new clothes, and so forth. These have no association with Christ but they do have a long association with the spring of the year.

I don't do any of those things for Easter, except maybe my kids color eggs and I hide them. That's my point though, you can make it personal and give your kids a different experience while still keeping to your beliefs but compromising with your husband.

The interesting thing about birthdays is that the early christians were opposed to them.

But they were in favor of slavery ... the also opposed women being equal to men (something I'm sure you would not agree with). Those people back then we very ignorant to ethics and morality (by todays standards), I think their judgment shouldn't be the basis for ones opinions these days.

would i be following his example if I practiced customs that he did not practice?

I wonder if Jesus ever used an ATM machine?

- Oni


This message is a reply to:
 Message 30 by Peg, posted 10-28-2009 5:25 AM Peg has not yet responded

    
onifre
Member (Idle past 1115 days)
Posts: 4854
From: Dark Side of the Moon
Joined: 02-20-2008


Message 33 of 34 (533042)
10-28-2009 10:38 AM
Reply to: Message 29 by caffeine
10-28-2009 4:56 AM


Re: Pagan roots of festivals
Christmas Day was selected to fall on the same day as pagan festvals

I'll ask you the same question I asked Peg, What do you mean by "pagan"...?

And - Whats a "pagan" festival?

As I understand it, a "pagan" is considered anyone who doesn't follow the 3 Abrahamic religions.

This said, I honestly doubt that God would mind. If your purpose is to celebrate the birth of Christ, he'd surely be aware of that and appreciate the intention. It always seemed deeply unfair to me as a child that whilst the Muslims, Hindus and irreligious alike all joined in at Christmas, the Jehovah's Witness kids weren't allowed.

I completely agree. Especially when the reason for not celebrating is some vague orgin story of "pagan" rituals that the kid has no clue about. Nor is any of it relevant today. It seems a bit exaggerated to keep to that kind of opinion, influenced by 2000 year old stories.

But hey, to each his own.

- Oni


This message is a reply to:
 Message 29 by caffeine, posted 10-28-2009 4:56 AM caffeine has not yet responded

    
AdminNosy
Administrator
Posts: 4754
From: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Joined: 11-11-2003


Message 34 of 34 (533049)
10-28-2009 10:58 AM


Topic
The topic here is not pagan holidays but rather advice to children.

Please return to the topic.


  
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