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Author Topic:   Scientific method biased..?
Blue Jay
Member (Idle past 2815 days)
Posts: 2843
From: You couldn't pronounce it with your mouthparts
Joined: 02-04-2008


Message 16 of 21 (536402)
11-22-2009 9:19 PM
Reply to: Message 14 by straightree
11-22-2009 4:53 PM


Hi, Straightree.
straightree writes:
The same mentioned Max Planck, explains how he found great resistance for the new concepts of Physics, by the guardians of the old theories.
Science is supposed to work this way.
To an extent, the conflict of competing theories helps science progress and discover which theory is the best available, so diversity of opinion and disagreements are often the sign of healthy, vibrant science. If you're looking for the "cutting-edge" science, find out the stuff that large groups of science are fighting about.
But, once one theory overwhelms all competing theories through the scientific method, indiscriminate open-mindedness can actually become a hindrance to science. Scientists should not be asked to review the possible evidence for all vanquished theories from the past without unequivocal reason to think it is necessary.
Objectivity does not require neutrality: in fact, it very often requires the opposite. When more than 90-95% of a scientific community agree on something and actively discriminate against all competitors, it is not usually because of dogma, but because of objective support for a theory that has shown exceptional empirical merit.

-Bluejay (a.k.a. Mantis, Thylacosmilus)
Darwin loves you.

This message is a reply to:
 Message 14 by straightree, posted 11-22-2009 4:53 PM straightree has replied

Replies to this message:
 Message 20 by straightree, posted 11-23-2009 3:26 PM Blue Jay has not replied

  
Blue Jay
Member (Idle past 2815 days)
Posts: 2843
From: You couldn't pronounce it with your mouthparts
Joined: 02-04-2008


Message 17 of 21 (536403)
11-22-2009 9:22 PM
Reply to: Message 3 by subbie
11-19-2009 10:17 AM


Hi, Subbie.
subbie writes:
My impression is that it's considerably harder to get funding to pay for research that challenges the current paradigm, whatever the field.
In general, yes. And it makes sense. If you consider that funding for research in a scientific field is awarded by scientists in that field (via peer review), then the degree of pervasiveness of a certain paradigm within that field will give a strong indication as to the support any challenger will be likely to find on his/her peer-review panel.

-Bluejay (a.k.a. Mantis, Thylacosmilus)
Darwin loves you.

This message is a reply to:
 Message 3 by subbie, posted 11-19-2009 10:17 AM subbie has not replied

  
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