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Author Topic:   Big-Sediment vs. Little-Sediment Flood Geology?
roxrkool
Member (Idle past 1124 days)
Posts: 1493
From: Nevada
Joined: 03-23-2003


Message 2 of 18 (71268)
12-05-2003 5:11 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by lpetrich
11-30-2003 1:06 PM


He's finally settled on little-sediment because like others, the idea that one flood could deposit so much sediment is hard to back up.

One problem I see is that unless the earth was lacking topography at the time, there is no way to deposit a thin layer. (Did he happen to mention how thin? Probably not.) Meaning that higher elevations would have very much less than the basins. I would expect several hundred feet of sediment in the basins, at the very least.

Also, this layer should crop out someplace. Simple stratigraphy would be able to trace the outcrop locally, as well as regionally, and even globally.

Two million years ago, you say, so he's an OEC? Two million years ago is a drop in the bucket. Those deposits would probably look as fresh today as the day they were deposited.

[This message has been edited by roxrkool, 12-05-2003]


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roxrkool
Member (Idle past 1124 days)
Posts: 1493
From: Nevada
Joined: 03-23-2003


Message 4 of 18 (72671)
12-13-2003 10:47 AM
Reply to: Message 3 by lpetrich
12-13-2003 7:10 AM


A flood of global proportions would not leave a thin little later of sediment. An ashfall leaves a thin layer. A global flood would leave a thick graded layer of boulders, vegetation, bones, etc.,overlain by various uniform layers that get finer and finer grained toward the top. You'd be able to trace it to every continent in the world.
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 Message 5 by Abshalom, posted 12-13-2003 11:20 AM roxrkool has not yet responded
 Message 9 by gene90, posted 12-15-2003 11:31 AM roxrkool has responded

    
roxrkool
Member (Idle past 1124 days)
Posts: 1493
From: Nevada
Joined: 03-23-2003


Message 8 of 18 (72949)
12-15-2003 10:51 AM
Reply to: Message 6 by Minnemooseus
12-15-2003 3:01 AM


I wasn't as detailed either, in my description. I did not mean that the massive conglomeratic layer would be global, just the finer grained seds that would settle out of the flood waters after the entire planet was inundated.

The higher altitudes would likely be stripped to bedrock while all the basins (aerial and sub-aerial, rivers, etc., would be filled with the massive conglomeratic deposits.


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roxrkool
Member (Idle past 1124 days)
Posts: 1493
From: Nevada
Joined: 03-23-2003


Message 10 of 18 (72978)
12-15-2003 1:44 PM
Reply to: Message 9 by gene90
12-15-2003 11:31 AM


Re: I disagree
I think of places like the Great Basin where a massive amount of sediment would be deposited. First a megaconglomerate followed by finer grained sequences. But I suppose if I were a creationist, I'd just say that the Great Basin was formed after the flood and therefore would not contain flood deposits. However, there are many other basins throughout geologic history. The Wit comes to mind.

Continents would most certainly have at least finer grained flood deposits that would be traceable across the globe. As has already been mentioned, the flood waters would be carrying large amounts of suspended sediment. The water was supposed to have covered the highest peak by about 200 feet, if I remember correctly. In the lowest lying elevations, fine-grained sediment would accumulate a least several feet thick.
Unfortunately, with creationists, there's always a way out.

[This message has been edited by roxrkool, 12-15-2003]


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roxrkool
Member (Idle past 1124 days)
Posts: 1493
From: Nevada
Joined: 03-23-2003


Message 12 of 18 (72982)
12-15-2003 1:49 PM
Reply to: Message 11 by Minnemooseus
12-15-2003 1:48 PM


Calculate? What's that??
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