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Author Topic:   Canadian Citzenship Questions
Percy
Member
Posts: 18309
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 2.7


Message 1 of 26 (779071)
02-29-2016 2:23 PM


If my mother was a born Canadian and my father a born American, and I was born in the US while my mother was still a Canadian, do I have dual citizenship in the US and Canada? Or am I still just an American citizen?

When my mother later became a naturalized American citizen, would she have retained her Canadian citizenship and have dual citizenship?

My mother's social security card recently turned up missing, and when I was gathering the documents to apply for a replacement I discovered that she didn't become a naturalized US citizen until after I was born.

My interpretation of what I've read online makes me think I have dual Canadian/US citizenship, and I was thinking of applying for a certificate of citizenship, but before filling out the forms and paying the application fee I thought I'd check opinion out there.

--Percy


Replies to this message:
 Message 2 by NoNukes, posted 02-29-2016 7:27 PM Percy has acknowledged this reply
 Message 4 by kjsimons, posted 02-29-2016 8:26 PM Percy has acknowledged this reply
 Message 5 by ProtoTypical, posted 02-29-2016 8:34 PM Percy has acknowledged this reply
 Message 9 by Hyroglyphx, posted 03-01-2016 12:48 AM Percy has acknowledged this reply

    
NoNukes
Inactive Member


Message 2 of 26 (779090)
02-29-2016 7:27 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by Percy
02-29-2016 2:23 PM


My interpretation of what I've read online makes me think I have dual Canadian/US citizenship

I believe that you are correct. I believe Canadian rules prevent you from passing that citizenship to your offspring, unless those offspring emigrate to Canada.

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/helpcentre/answer.asp?qnum=3...

quote:
Every country decides whom it considers to be a citizen. If more than one country recognizes you as a citizen, you have dual citizenship.

You do not apply for dual citizenship and there is no related certificate. Canadians are allowed to take foreign citizenship while keeping their Canadian citizenship.



Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people. Martin Luther King

If there are no stupid questions, then what kind of questions do stupid people ask? Do they get smart just in time to ask questions? Scott Adams


This message is a reply to:
 Message 1 by Percy, posted 02-29-2016 2:23 PM Percy has acknowledged this reply

Replies to this message:
 Message 3 by Faith, posted 02-29-2016 7:29 PM NoNukes has responded

  
Faith
Inactive Member


Message 3 of 26 (779091)
02-29-2016 7:29 PM
Reply to: Message 2 by NoNukes
02-29-2016 7:27 PM


Interesting, then my Canadian father also had dual citizenship. I wonder if he knew it.
This message is a reply to:
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Replies to this message:
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kjsimons
Member
Posts: 665
From: Orlando,FL
Joined: 06-17-2003


(2)
Message 4 of 26 (779097)
02-29-2016 8:26 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by Percy
02-29-2016 2:23 PM


I concur after viewing some sites on the web that you probably are a Canadian citizen, the question I have is, is this your plan 'B' if a republican gets elected in the upcoming Presidential election?
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ProtoTypical
Member
Posts: 1776
From: Ontario Canada
Joined: 08-04-2010


Message 5 of 26 (779098)
02-29-2016 8:34 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by Percy
02-29-2016 2:23 PM


I would investigate any tax obligations that might arise from a dual citizenship before applying. I don't think it would cost you anything but you might have to file.
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 Message 1 by Percy, posted 02-29-2016 2:23 PM Percy has acknowledged this reply

  
jar
Member
Posts: 30934
From: Texas!!
Joined: 04-20-2004


Message 6 of 26 (779104)
02-29-2016 8:48 PM
Reply to: Message 4 by kjsimons
02-29-2016 8:26 PM


I concur after viewing some sites on the web that you probably are a Canadian citizen, the question I have is, is this your plan 'B' if a republican gets elected in the upcoming Presidential election?

Hey it worked for Burger King.


Anyone so limited that they can only spell a word one way is severely handicapped!

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NoNukes
Inactive Member


Message 7 of 26 (779107)
02-29-2016 8:55 PM
Reply to: Message 3 by Faith
02-29-2016 7:29 PM


Interesting, then my Canadian father also had dual citizenship. I wonder if he knew it

Perhaps. During the quick review I did before posting I noted that the rules regarding citizenship had changed over the years. In some cases where citizenship is granted automatically now, it was once required that you undergo some formalities.

But it is certainly possible that your father did have dual citizenship.


Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people. Martin Luther King

If there are no stupid questions, then what kind of questions do stupid people ask? Do they get smart just in time to ask questions? Scott Adams


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 Message 3 by Faith, posted 02-29-2016 7:29 PM Faith has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 8 by Faith, posted 02-29-2016 9:02 PM NoNukes has responded

  
Faith
Inactive Member


Message 8 of 26 (779110)
02-29-2016 9:02 PM
Reply to: Message 7 by NoNukes
02-29-2016 8:55 PM


If, like Percy's mother, my father got his American citizenship after I was born, would that then confer dual citizenship on me too?
This message is a reply to:
 Message 7 by NoNukes, posted 02-29-2016 8:55 PM NoNukes has responded

Replies to this message:
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Hyroglyphx
Member
Posts: 5622
From: Austin, TX
Joined: 05-03-2006


Message 9 of 26 (779125)
03-01-2016 12:48 AM
Reply to: Message 1 by Percy
02-29-2016 2:23 PM


Ask Ted Cruz.

What?

Too soon?

It sounds like you would qualify, but I would definitely call an embassy to verify how you go about proving it.


"Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it" -- Thomas Paine

This message is a reply to:
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NoNukes
Inactive Member


Message 10 of 26 (779129)
03-01-2016 2:15 AM
Reply to: Message 8 by Faith
02-29-2016 9:02 PM


If, like Percy's mother, my father got his American citizenship after I was born, would that then confer dual citizenship on me too?

It's complicated. If our father was born in Canada, then you may well be a citizen, but there are some complicating rules and if this means something to you some research would be involved and some facts would need to be explored.

However, you might not be able to pass that citizenship on. Canadian law contains a cutoff on citizenship acquired without being in Canada. Does not extend it to second generation, but does make it easier for this second generation folks to obtain citizenship if they apply.

There is a solid chance that you have or could quickly acquire Canadian citizenship.


Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people. Martin Luther King

If there are no stupid questions, then what kind of questions do stupid people ask? Do they get smart just in time to ask questions? Scott Adams


This message is a reply to:
 Message 8 by Faith, posted 02-29-2016 9:02 PM Faith has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 14 by Faith, posted 03-01-2016 12:18 PM NoNukes has responded

  
GDR
Member
Posts: 4782
From: Sidney, BC, Canada
Joined: 05-22-2005
Member Rating: 1.5


Message 11 of 26 (779130)
03-01-2016 2:33 AM


I'm not sure Percy. My son grew up in Canada and married an American and moved south of the border. When he took up US citizenship he had to renounce his Canadian citizenship. However he did that in the US so it probably wouldn't make any difference if he wanted to come back to Canada,

One of his sons was looking at working in Canada but it seemed that there was an age cut-off around 19. However, as you have never lived in Canada I would doubt that you are a citizen but you could possibly apply for citizenship although I would think that you would have to show that you intended to move up here.

Someone mentioned taxes and Canada, unlike the US, does not tax Canadians that are resident and earning in another country. My wife is dual having grown up not far from you in Boston and the IRS is a nightmare to deal with. She hasn't lived in the US for nearly 38 years and yet every year we have to not only fill out a US tax form but also the FBar form and now it looks like they have added another one. I have never been able to get a straight answer to any inquiry from the IRS.


He has told you, O man, what is good ; And what does the LORD require of you But to do justice, to love kindness, And to walk humbly with your God.

Micah 6:8


Replies to this message:
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Percy
Member
Posts: 18309
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 2.7


Message 12 of 26 (779143)
03-01-2016 6:44 AM


Thanks for all the answers. It's not impossible that my mother renounced her Canadian citizenship when she became an American. She no longer remembers, but she wouldn't have done it on her own, it would probably have depended on what the US rules were at time. Nonetheless, I'm contemplating applying for a citizenship certificate and paying the $75 fee. There doesn't seem to be a way to ask the question, "Am I a citizen?" without going through the application process.

--Percy


Replies to this message:
 Message 13 by NoNukes, posted 03-01-2016 11:44 AM Percy has acknowledged this reply
 Message 20 by RAZD, posted 03-02-2016 5:04 PM Percy has responded

    
NoNukes
Inactive Member


Message 13 of 26 (779159)
03-01-2016 11:44 AM
Reply to: Message 12 by Percy
03-01-2016 6:44 AM


In the US, the semi-official government position is that dual citizenship is frowned upon. The government does not try to prevent US citizens from becoming dual citizens, but doing so might cause them to look askance at you if you get into a situation in a foreign country and need government help.

However for those foreigners who want to become US citizens, they will have to take an oath that requires them to renounce their foreign citizenship. It is pretty close to certain that your mom took this oath. Some countries consider that oath to be binding, but many countries don't really care about that oath, and won't revoke your citizenship simply for taking an oath as part of a naturalization ceremony.

I wasn't able to find a clear statement of Canada's policy on this issue during a quick search, but what I did find suggests that simply taking a naturalization oath won't cause Canada to revoke citizenship. If you are interested in this issue, I wouldn't assume that your mom lost her Canadian citizenship.


Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people. Martin Luther King

If there are no stupid questions, then what kind of questions do stupid people ask? Do they get smart just in time to ask questions? Scott Adams


This message is a reply to:
 Message 12 by Percy, posted 03-01-2016 6:44 AM Percy has acknowledged this reply

  
Faith
Inactive Member


Message 14 of 26 (779164)
03-01-2016 12:18 PM
Reply to: Message 10 by NoNukes
03-01-2016 2:15 AM


Turns out one of my nephews has been interested in this question and has researched it some though I gather not definitively.

My father, his grandfather, was naturalized before he married my mother so whatever his citizenship status was wouldn't automatically come to his children, but according to my nephew it should nevertheless be a lot easier for us to get dual citizenship if we want it.

As others here are saying, you do have to renounce your Canadian citizenship on becoming a US citizen, but Canada doesn't recognize that renunciation.

According to my nephew, his generation doesn't get any special benefit in seeking dual citizenship through their grandfather, but if my brother decided to do whatever it takes and get dual citizenship, then it would consequently be easier for his children to get it too. My brother goes to Canada whenever he gets the chance because he's a Canadian in spirit and loves all our multitudinous Canadian relatives, so I could see him doing it.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 10 by NoNukes, posted 03-01-2016 2:15 AM NoNukes has responded

Replies to this message:
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NoNukes
Inactive Member


Message 15 of 26 (779174)
03-01-2016 2:59 PM
Reply to: Message 14 by Faith
03-01-2016 12:18 PM


urns out one of my nephews has been interested in this question and has researched it some though I gather not definitively

What you describe here matches my own research. Becoming a dual citizen may have some tax implications.

Edited by NoNukes, : No reason given.


Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also in prison. Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (1846)

History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people. Martin Luther King

If there are no stupid questions, then what kind of questions do stupid people ask? Do they get smart just in time to ask questions? Scott Adams


This message is a reply to:
 Message 14 by Faith, posted 03-01-2016 12:18 PM Faith has not yet responded

  
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