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Author Topic:   Home sapiens older than we realized
RAZD
Member (Idle past 268 days)
Posts: 20714
From: the other end of the sidewalk
Joined: 03-14-2004


Message 4 of 7 (811408)
06-07-2017 4:48 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by Chiroptera
06-07-2017 3:52 PM


Actually that just seems to close the gap between H. sapiens and H. heidelberensis

quote:
Human Evolution


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by our ability to understand
RebelAmerican☆Zen☯Deist
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RAZD
Member (Idle past 268 days)
Posts: 20714
From: the other end of the sidewalk
Joined: 03-14-2004


Message 5 of 7 (811410)
06-07-2017 4:55 PM
Reply to: Message 2 by caffeine
06-07-2017 4:45 PM


Take the above. You say that H. sapiens was believed to appear in East Africa 200,000 years ago, but is that really the case? It's worth remembering that it has at various times been common to refer to neanderthals as H. sapiens neandertalensis, and some workers still do so today. So, by this classification, there were H. sapiens in Europe more than 250,000 years ago.

The oldest "anatomically modern" fossils I am aware of prior to this find is 160,000 years ago:

quote:
160,000-year-old fossilized skulls uncovered in Ethiopia are oldest anatomically modern humans

"We've lacked intermediate fossils between pre-humans and modern humans, between 100,000 and 300,000 years ago, and that's where the Herto fossils fit," said paleoanthropologist Tim White, professor of integrative biology at the University of California, Berkeley, and a co-leader of the team that excavated and analyzed the discovery site. "Now, the fossil record meshes with the molecular evidence."


It's all good.

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we are limited in our ability to understand
by our ability to understand
RebelAmerican☆Zen☯Deist
... to learn ... to think ... to live ... to laugh ...
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