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Author Topic:   Geology Book suggestions for American Southwest
Tanypteryx
Member
Posts: 2380
From: Oregon, USA
Joined: 08-27-2006


Message 1 of 9 (713748)
12-16-2013 12:30 PM


The discussion going on right now in the Why the Flood Never Happened thread has really sparked my interest in the geology of the whole area.

I drove past/through many of the places discussed during my trip last May, but I realize now that I did not photograph nearly as many of the key features that are exposed, as I should have.

I will be driving down through the region again next August and I would like to be a lot better prepared to understand what I am seeing and what the history of the formation of the features is.

When I look at various layers of strata I would like to know where else that layer is exposed, what time period it was deposited, what types of fossils it contains and anything else we know about it.

I am looking for 2 or 3 good books that will explain why it looks the way it does now and what it looked like over the past billion years or so.

I always travel with a box of books so a few more will be great.


What if Eleanor Roosevelt had wings? -- Monty Python

One important characteristic of a theory is that is has survived repeated attempts to falsify it. Contrary to your understanding, all available evidence confirms it. --Subbie

If evolution is shown to be false, it will be at the hands of things that are true, not made up. --percy


Replies to this message:
 Message 2 by Coyote, posted 12-16-2013 12:37 PM Tanypteryx has responded
 Message 4 by RAZD, posted 12-16-2013 7:25 PM Tanypteryx has responded
 Message 7 by Tempe 12ft Chicken, posted 12-20-2013 3:08 PM Tanypteryx has responded

  
Coyote
Member (Idle past 761 days)
Posts: 6117
Joined: 01-12-2008


Message 2 of 9 (713749)
12-16-2013 12:37 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by Tanypteryx
12-16-2013 12:30 PM


Try the Roadside Geology series.

You can google up the titles.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 1 by Tanypteryx, posted 12-16-2013 12:30 PM Tanypteryx has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 3 by Tanypteryx, posted 12-16-2013 12:48 PM Coyote has not yet responded

  
Tanypteryx
Member
Posts: 2380
From: Oregon, USA
Joined: 08-27-2006


Message 3 of 9 (713751)
12-16-2013 12:48 PM
Reply to: Message 2 by Coyote
12-16-2013 12:37 PM


Thanks. I already use the Roadside Geology of Oregon. I will definitely add the others to my book box.

I am also hoping for some illustration rich textbooks that others think are good ones. At the price of those kinds of books these days I want to get the most bang for my buck.


What if Eleanor Roosevelt had wings? -- Monty Python

One important characteristic of a theory is that is has survived repeated attempts to falsify it. Contrary to your understanding, all available evidence confirms it. --Subbie

If evolution is shown to be false, it will be at the hands of things that are true, not made up. --percy


This message is a reply to:
 Message 2 by Coyote, posted 12-16-2013 12:37 PM Coyote has not yet responded

  
RAZD
Member (Idle past 60 days)
Posts: 20714
From: the other end of the sidewalk
Joined: 03-14-2004


Message 4 of 9 (713822)
12-16-2013 7:25 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by Tanypteryx
12-16-2013 12:30 PM


Creationists would have you believe that the Grand Canyon formed in Noah's flood. They offer raft trips down the Colorado River where they explain how this supposedly happened. Once you're done with the trip, you can stop by one of the park’s bookstores and pick up a copy ofThe Creationists would have you believe that the Grand Canyon formed in Noah's flood. They offer raft trips down the Colorado River where they explain how this supposedly happened. Once you're done with the trip, you can stop by one of the park’s bookstores and pick up a copy of The Grand Canyon: A Different View, written by tour leader Tom Vail., written by tour leader Tom Vail.

Might be good for laughs, but I don't think I would waste a dime on it ... unless you are a masochist or someone interested in being deceived.

Apparently you can get a used copy for $0.01 ... plus shipping ...

http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&field-keywords=The%20Gran...

Enjoy

Edited by RAZD, : itals


we are limited in our ability to understand
by our ability to understand
Rebel American Zen Deist
... to learn ... to think ... to live ... to laugh ...
to share.


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This message is a reply to:
 Message 1 by Tanypteryx, posted 12-16-2013 12:30 PM Tanypteryx has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 5 by Tanypteryx, posted 12-16-2013 9:01 PM RAZD has responded

  
Tanypteryx
Member
Posts: 2380
From: Oregon, USA
Joined: 08-27-2006


(1)
Message 5 of 9 (713834)
12-16-2013 9:01 PM
Reply to: Message 4 by RAZD
12-16-2013 7:25 PM


Thanks RAZD

I think I will stick with my plan. I am hoping that I can use the books to actually plan where I want to stop and look, but to try and get photos that clearly show specific formations.

One place I really regret not spending a day shooting was Near Hurricane, UT. The uplift there is quite dramatic and I did not realize that that it was sitting right on top of the Hurricane Fault from the diagrams. More planning should make my trip more fulfilling.

I will be driving down with 2 other friends, each in our own rig, and then meeting 2 more friends from the mid-west to explore and survey the dragonflies of an incredible desert stream in SE Arizona that 3 of us discovered last May. I am hoping to get them all enthusiastic about the geology of the region too.

Maybe, The Grand Canyon: A Different View would be good to have after all. I know they would all have fun with the creationist goofiness in camp, in the evenings when we are processing specimens, checking our photos and sharing a fine brandy. We often try to puzzle out how they could be so silly.


What if Eleanor Roosevelt had wings? -- Monty Python

One important characteristic of a theory is that is has survived repeated attempts to falsify it. Contrary to your understanding, all available evidence confirms it. --Subbie

If evolution is shown to be false, it will be at the hands of things that are true, not made up. --percy


This message is a reply to:
 Message 4 by RAZD, posted 12-16-2013 7:25 PM RAZD has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 6 by RAZD, posted 12-19-2013 5:08 PM Tanypteryx has responded

  
RAZD
Member (Idle past 60 days)
Posts: 20714
From: the other end of the sidewalk
Joined: 03-14-2004


(1)
Message 6 of 9 (714095)
12-19-2013 5:08 PM
Reply to: Message 5 by Tanypteryx
12-16-2013 9:01 PM


Go squirrely ...
One thing to consider is seeing the GC from the north rim -- fewer tourists AND there is a ground squirrel that has evolved from a common ancestor with one on the south rim into different species. Cute little buggers.

Enjoy

Edited by RAZD, : ..


we are limited in our ability to understand
by our ability to understand
Rebel American Zen Deist
... to learn ... to think ... to live ... to laugh ...
to share.


• • • Join the effort to solve medical problems, AIDS/HIV, Cancer and more with Team EvC! (click) • • •

This message is a reply to:
 Message 5 by Tanypteryx, posted 12-16-2013 9:01 PM Tanypteryx has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 8 by Tanypteryx, posted 12-21-2013 12:11 PM RAZD has acknowledged this reply

  
Tempe 12ft Chicken
Member (Idle past 446 days)
Posts: 438
From: Tempe, Az.
Joined: 10-25-2012


(1)
Message 7 of 9 (714217)
12-20-2013 3:08 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by Tanypteryx
12-16-2013 12:30 PM


How about the book entitled, "Geology of the Southwest". This will give you more information than simply getting a book about the Canyon, as there are many structures worth a visit out here.

Geology of the Southwest by Balridge

Another suggestion if you have not been would be to stop in Arches National Park in Utah, there is some beautifully sculpted sandstone landscapes and some nice and simple day hikes. Also, Meteor Crater if you have never been there. It is quite a sight to see the crater and realize that a rock 50 meters across made the hole that you are looking at. Absolutely amazing!!!

Another cool visit, not quite geological but manmade, is Montezuma's Castle. It is amazing to see the abilities of some of the ancient people when building structures confined to cliff edges. Great thing to visit.

If you are willing to make a long hike, Havasupai (which is thirteen miles long) offers a great way to explore one of the side canyons off the GC. Contained within this hike is a lot of desert landscape and then a scrub brushish forest. Once in the campground at the bottom you are within simple walking distance of three amazing waterfalls. Havasu Falls is about 100-150 feet in height and has some cool boulders near the falls to jump off of into the pool, Moonie falls is about 250 feet in height and has a small little cave behind the falls and Apache Falls is a very secluded portion of falls with a legend that the Apache chief refused to surrender at the top of the falls and the Havasupai chief stabbed him and threw him down the falls. Just a great experience there.

I will try and think of some other suggestions for you as well.


The theory of evolution by cumulative natural selection is the only theory we know of that is in principle capable of explaining the existence of organized complexity. - Richard Dawkins

Creationists make it sound as though a 'theory' is something you dreamt up after being drunk all night. - Issac Asimov

If you removed all the arteries, veins, & capillaries from a person’s body, and tied them end-to-end…the person will die. - Neil Degrasse Tyson

What would Buddha do? Nothing! What does the Buddhist terrorist do? Goes into the middle of the street, takes the gas, *pfft*, Self-Barbecue. The Christian and the Muslim on either side are yelling, "What the Fuck are you doing?" The Buddhist says, "Making you deal with your shit. - Robin Williams


This message is a reply to:
 Message 1 by Tanypteryx, posted 12-16-2013 12:30 PM Tanypteryx has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 9 by Tanypteryx, posted 12-21-2013 12:24 PM Tempe 12ft Chicken has not yet responded

  
Tanypteryx
Member
Posts: 2380
From: Oregon, USA
Joined: 08-27-2006


Message 8 of 9 (714314)
12-21-2013 12:11 PM
Reply to: Message 6 by RAZD
12-19-2013 5:08 PM


Re: Go squirrely ...
Thanks RAZD.

I remember years ago reading about them.

I found this on Wikipedia:

Wikipedia writes:

The Kaibab squirrel lives in the ponderosa pine forests,[4] where it builds its nest out of twigs and pine needles. It eats acorns, fruit, and fungi (especially an underground truffle),[3] as well as the seeds, bark, and twigs of the trees where it makes its home. The Kaibab squirrel's most significant source of food is the seeds found within ponderosa pine cones.[5] Young squirrels are born between April and August.

Kaibab squirrels, ponderosa pines, and the fungi which grow in the vicinity of the ponderosas exist in a symbiotic relationship.

In the past the Kaibab squirrel was given species status (Sciurus kaibabensis) but today is considered a subspecies of the Abert's squirrel, (Sciurus aberti).[6]
The Kaibab squirrel is an example of evolution occurring through geographic isolation.[3] The Abert's squirrel, with its several subspecies, has a much broader distribution and is found on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. The difference between North Rim and South Rim Abert's squirrels has given rise to the commonly held, but incorrect assumption that the canyon itself acted as a barrier preventing gene flow between the two populations, but modern Kaibab squirrels are descended from populations of Abert's squirrels that dispersed into the Grand Canyon area following the last ice age.[7] As the climate warmed, ponderosa pine stands and the Abert's squirrels living there, were limited to areas of high elevation like the Kaibab Plateau. These isolated populations eventually became modern Kaibab squirrels and, as the climate cooled again and ponderosa pines once again grew at lower elevations, other Abert's squirrel subspecies returned to the Grand Canyon area, filling in their former niches on the South Rim.

I seem to remember something about a controversy over the proposed building of an observatory or something. There was a protest that it could have a negative impact on one of the populations.


What if Eleanor Roosevelt had wings? -- Monty Python

One important characteristic of a theory is that is has survived repeated attempts to falsify it. Contrary to your understanding, all available evidence confirms it. --Subbie

If evolution is shown to be false, it will be at the hands of things that are true, not made up. --percy


This message is a reply to:
 Message 6 by RAZD, posted 12-19-2013 5:08 PM RAZD has acknowledged this reply

  
Tanypteryx
Member
Posts: 2380
From: Oregon, USA
Joined: 08-27-2006


Message 9 of 9 (714316)
12-21-2013 12:24 PM
Reply to: Message 7 by Tempe 12ft Chicken
12-20-2013 3:08 PM


Thanks Tempe.

I had already added Geology of the Southwest by Balridge to my Christmas wish list.

Another cool visit, not quite geological but manmade, is Montezuma's Castle. It is amazing to see the abilities of some of the ancient people when building structures confined to cliff edges. Great thing to visit.

In May, I spent 3 days at Mesa Verde and lugged my camera all over the place, including into 2 of the largest cliff dwellings. Well worth the visit and a great place for photography.

I also spent 2 days at Chaco Canyon, another fascinating place built by the ancient Puebloan people.

I appreciate the suggestions.


What if Eleanor Roosevelt had wings? -- Monty Python

One important characteristic of a theory is that is has survived repeated attempts to falsify it. Contrary to your understanding, all available evidence confirms it. --Subbie

If evolution is shown to be false, it will be at the hands of things that are true, not made up. --percy


This message is a reply to:
 Message 7 by Tempe 12ft Chicken, posted 12-20-2013 3:08 PM Tempe 12ft Chicken has not yet responded

  
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