Understanding through Discussion


Welcome! You are not logged in. [ Login ]
EvC Forum active members: 87 (8891 total)
Current session began: 
Page Loaded: 02-22-2019 6:13 AM
161 online now:
CosmicChimp, PaulK, Tangle (3 members, 158 visitors)
Chatting now:  Chat room empty
Newest Member: WookieeB
Upcoming Birthdays: CosmicChimp
Post Volume:
Total: 847,770 Year: 2,807/19,786 Month: 889/1,918 Week: 176/301 Day: 1/27 Hour: 0/0


Thread  Details

Email This Thread
Newer Topic | Older Topic
  
Prev12
3
4Next
Author Topic:   The Movie Thread
kuresu
Member (Idle past 561 days)
Posts: 2544
From: boulder, colorado
Joined: 03-24-2006


Message 31 of 54 (432741)
11-08-2007 12:05 AM
Reply to: Message 28 by BMG
10-13-2007 3:32 AM


Re: The Lives of Others
check out post 22.
Angla beat you to the punch.
This message is a reply to:
 Message 28 by BMG, posted 10-13-2007 3:32 AM BMG has not yet responded

    
anglagard
Member
Posts: 2185
From: Socorro, New Mexico USA
Joined: 03-18-2006


Message 32 of 54 (758399)
05-25-2015 2:05 AM


It's Alive
First, thanks to the tip on finding old threads provided by Moose under the goofy primary one, I was able to revive this old conversation. It appears the search function on EVC works much better now than when I last tried to use it several years ago.

A few things have happened since the last post here on 10/13/2007. First, I now consider Kristof Kieslowski among the best directors, if not the best. In addition to the three colors trilogy (Blue is slow as an Ozu film until the final payoff, White moves faster and shows more of Kieslowski's unexpected twists, Red is unique and the best of the three), there is the Dekalogue, which is technically not a movie but rather 10 episodes of a miniseries.

It is the best. But don't take my word for it:

Skipping over English language movies, here is what has particularly impressed me from the rest of the world by nation since 2007.

Argentina

The Secret in their Eyes - At the end you will discover there are punishments worse than the death penalty. (IMDB #137)

BRAZIL

City of God - What lies in Rio dies in Rio. (#21)

Elite Squad - And you thought police were corrupt here.

Elite Squad, the Enemy Within - Indeed, see above.

FRANCE

The Intouchables - Quadriplegic rich French guy meets streetwise
black guy, both learn from the other and eventually connect. (#39)

Tall Blonde Man in One Black Shoe - Saw this a long time ago from San Francisco TV channel (damn liberals!) hilarious, sequel even funnier. Had to get DVD from Russia, Packaging and DVD instructions in Cyrillic - good luck with translation.

INDIA

Kahaani - Everyone, and I mean absolutely everyone who has been hooked up with this movie either by myself or my daughter goes away very impressed. To even begin to explain would be spoiling.

Like Stars on Earth - Goofy kid has trouble in school, everyone including parents pissed off makes kid miserable, understanding teacher (Aamir Khan) sets things right. An excellent movie IMHO. (#115)

3 Idiots - College graduates seek a reunion with their hijinks ringleader (Aamir Khan). Good but not great, still worth a peek. (#116)

Rang De Basanti - Young woman from England researching her past ancestor travels to India and tries to make documentary about the UK colonial experience from their perspective. Young Indian actors don't take her seriously, give her shit, until ... (I like movies that abruptly change). Starring Aamir Khan. (Is there a theme going in here? #174)

RUSSIA

Stalker - This movie IMHO more than any other I have ever seen will haunt your dreams. The stalker, who knows his way around a forbidden area leads a scientist and journalist to the room which will grant any human their wish. Unique, incredible, and vastly underrated. (#198)

12 - Not just a simple remake of Twelve Angry Men featuring twelve angry Russians, this one detracts from the original toward the end for a different, yet plausible conclusion.

More to come.

Edited by anglagard, : Accident hitting wrong key and posting prematurely


    
ringo
Member
Posts: 16147
From: frozen wasteland
Joined: 03-23-2005
Member Rating: 3.0


(1)
Message 33 of 54 (758420)
05-25-2015 12:19 PM


I've seen some good movies from Finland:
The Man Without a Past
Rare Exports: A Christmas Tale
Lapland Odyssey
and of course:
Leningrad Cowboys Meet Moses

  
ramoss
Member
Posts: 3099
Joined: 08-11-2004
Member Rating: 6.3


Message 34 of 54 (758433)
05-25-2015 7:26 PM
Reply to: Message 23 by Percy
09-23-2007 7:59 AM


Re: My Favorite Movies
When I was younger, I went to a talk by Howard Koch, one of the screen writers for Casablanca, and he talked about being on set (and he showed the movie).
This message is a reply to:
 Message 23 by Percy, posted 09-23-2007 7:59 AM Percy has not yet responded

  
xongsmith
Member
Posts: 1870
From: massachusetts US
Joined: 01-01-2009


Message 35 of 54 (758493)
05-27-2015 1:51 AM


I'll toss in "McCabe & Mrs. Miller" - not because it's good, but because I really like it.

Doesn't hurt to have a Leonard Cohen soundtrack either.


- xongsmith, 5.7d

    
anglagard
Member
Posts: 2185
From: Socorro, New Mexico USA
Joined: 03-18-2006


Message 36 of 54 (780252)
03-13-2016 4:04 AM


Argentina Hits Another Out of the Park
Provided one is comfortable with subtitles, and for those few in the USA actually comfortable with the fact there are another 221 nations on this planet, I offer the latest gem -- Wild Tales

The movie consists of six vignettes, some as short as 15 minutes. My take is it is a combination of Kieslowski and The Twilight Zone.

I also add a documentary to this post, The Look of Silence. It is about the genocide against suspected "Communists" (eg. labor organizers for example) back in 1965 Indonesia that had around a million victims. And I thought Grave of the Fireflies was depressing. Here we have an interviewer, who lost his brother to the genocide, bear witness to the executioners smiling, laughing, and bragging about how they tortured and killed their victims, many of which hold high office to this day including the vice presidency. The interviewers brother -- turns out he finally died despite enduring the worst torture because he bled to death after being castrated by sword.

I think the Hague needs to step up its game. Banality of evil is not the same as rejoicing in evil, yet both share one overarching similarity, namely evil itself.

Now for the pop stars:

Mad Max: Fury Road - Entertaining due to outlandish effects and a refreshing somewhat feminist take.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens - It is what it is, a rehash of the original. Still better than the prequels.

Hateful Eight - Tarantino, nuff' said.
.
Room - Spent fist half waiting for cops to arrive, tedious yet somehow compelling.

Truth - Dan Rathers' fall from grace - formulaic.

The Revenant - Boring, and lies about Hugh Glass' story which is questionable to begin with - formulaic.

Spotlight - Addresses child abuse scandal in Boston Catholic church, good movie yet still formulaic.

Bridge of Spies - Just OK, sort of follows history except the part about U2 pilot Gary Powers being tortured by the Soviets. Semi-formulaic.

Ex Machina - Interesting movie concerning the ethics if AI. Maybe the robot should be hired as a screenwriter - not formulaic.

Obviously my taste in movies is not to everyone's liking, just as in music I prefer complexity, surprise, and originality -- others may differ in their opinions and all are subjective.

My own daughter calls me a hipster -- well in the words of God and Popeye, I am what I am and believe "to thine ownself be true".

Edited by anglagard, : Title

Edited by anglagard, : clarity

Edited by anglagard, : extraneous word 'are' in second sentence


Read not to contradict and confute, not to believe and take for granted, not to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and consider. - Francis Bacon

Replies to this message:
 Message 37 by Hyroglyphx, posted 03-13-2016 4:42 AM anglagard has not yet responded

    
Hyroglyphx
Member
Posts: 5607
From: Austin, TX
Joined: 05-03-2006


Message 37 of 54 (780253)
03-13-2016 4:42 AM
Reply to: Message 36 by anglagard
03-13-2016 4:04 AM


Re: Argentina Hits Another Out of the Park
The Revenant - Boring, and lies about Hugh Glass' story which is questionable to begin with - formulaic.

Granted, the movie lasted longer than it should have and a lot of the plot lines are embellished from the real Hugh Glass story, but cinematically I thought it was great. The raid scene and the bear scene were pretty damn awesome...


"Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it" -- Thomas Paine

This message is a reply to:
 Message 36 by anglagard, posted 03-13-2016 4:04 AM anglagard has not yet responded

    
1.61803
Member
Posts: 2812
From: Lone Star State USA
Joined: 02-19-2004
Member Rating: 4.9


Message 38 of 54 (781958)
04-12-2016 4:07 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by anglagard
12-03-2006 3:30 PM


a couple I liked
Hi anglagard,

I was once having a business lunch with some co-workers at a Cracker Barrel. (Not my choice) Somehow the topic of cinema came up and one of the ladies that works in my office asked me "what kind of movies do you likke to watch.?" To which I replied, "I have lately been enjoying foreign films."
Immediately all the people at the table went silent. And all were making a awkward face towards me. I asked, "Did I say something wrong?" It was only later I found out that they heard me say:
" I have lately been enjoying PORN films." lol.

Well I do. Enjoy foreign films that is. I seen a Danish film not to long ago called: "After the wedding"(2006)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0457655/
It was very well done in my opinon and very refreshing in how it was scripted and shot. Which is one of the reason I like foreign films. Another great classic is "The Conformist" (1970)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065571/
directed by
Bernardo Bertolucci. To me one of the most gorgeously framed and shot films I have ever seen. Enjoy.

Edited by 1.61803, : 1970 2006

Edited by 1.61803, : spell


"You were not there for the beginning. You will not be there for the end. Your knowledge of what is going on can only be superficial and relative" William S. Burroughs

This message is a reply to:
 Message 1 by anglagard, posted 12-03-2006 3:30 PM anglagard has not yet responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 39 by dwise1, posted 04-13-2016 3:30 PM 1.61803 has responded

  
dwise1
Member
Posts: 3285
Joined: 05-02-2006
Member Rating: 7.5


Message 39 of 54 (782022)
04-13-2016 3:30 PM
Reply to: Message 38 by 1.61803
04-12-2016 4:07 PM


Re: a couple I liked
To which I replied, "I have lately been enjoying foreign films."
. . . It was only later I found out that they heard me say:
" I have lately been enjoying PORN films." lol.

Actually, when I was a junior-high teenager in the first half of the 60's, I saw the two genres are being equivalent, since the foreign films weren't so strongly censored against nudity.

Having since been a foreign language major, I also enjoy foreign films and TV, making those what I watch most on Netflix.

Appropriate to the Republican primaries (and developed independently therefrom), Netflix has a German satire from last year, Er ist wieder da ("He is Here Again" -- English Title "Look Who's Back" -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Look_Who%27s_Back_(film) ). In 2014, Adolf Hitler suddenly appears on the site of his bunker in the middle of Berlin, is mistaken for a street performer, and becomes a media sensation as he plans his political come-back. Many parts of the film were taken from him being in character on the streets and in the Gasthäuser of Germany talking with actual Germans. Of course, those were biased towards favorable reactions to him with a few negative reactions included. Their complaints, which he promised to address, were unemployment, complaints about immigrants, and the feeling that they were powerless, that their votes did not count, that they had no say in what the government was imposing on them (especially by letting all those foreigners in). And one of the things that Hitler promised them was that he could make Germany great again.

If you've seen "Downfall", you should recognize the parody of the scene where Hitler was finally informed that his military defenses no longer existed, only this time it's a TV executive faced with plummeting ratings having been informed that the host of his only popular show had quit.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 38 by 1.61803, posted 04-12-2016 4:07 PM 1.61803 has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 40 by 1.61803, posted 04-13-2016 4:44 PM dwise1 has responded

    
1.61803
Member
Posts: 2812
From: Lone Star State USA
Joined: 02-19-2004
Member Rating: 4.9


Message 40 of 54 (782023)
04-13-2016 4:44 PM
Reply to: Message 39 by dwise1
04-13-2016 3:30 PM


Re: a couple I liked
I will have to check out "Look who's back" My wife is German so she will probably get a kick out of it. We watch many German films together. I know I do not get the full effect having to read subtitles.
I am leaning German but it is a complex language. Didnt someone famous say, "Life is too short to learn German." ?

I did see "Down fall" and will watch pretty much anything that has to do with WWII. One of my favorite scenes in that one is when the old
salty Field Marshall General is taking artillery fire at his position just outside Berlin. He is covered with dust as he goes marching into Hitlers bunker, unbeknownst to him he is being called there to be shot for cowardice and retreating in the face of the enemy.
The look on his face is priceless.

I once wrote a long and flowery poem to my wife in English and then used Google translate to translate it into German.
How funny it was to see how all my flowery language was chopped into astringent short sentences. Not romantic at all but my wife got a laugh out of it ! German films worth a look:
"M"(1931 Fritz Lang) a must see for any film buff. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0022100/

Peter Lore screaming...."ICH MUSSSSSSS!!!!!!!"

"Barbara" (2012 Christian Petzold) Period piece that is a stark, harsh look at life on the East side of the wall circa early 1980's that sharply contrast with the softer side of what love can drive us to do.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2178941/


"You were not there for the beginning. You will not be there for the end. Your knowledge of what is going on can only be superficial and relative" William S. Burroughs

This message is a reply to:
 Message 39 by dwise1, posted 04-13-2016 3:30 PM dwise1 has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 41 by dwise1, posted 04-14-2016 1:37 AM 1.61803 has responded
 Message 42 by dwise1, posted 04-15-2016 6:26 AM 1.61803 has not yet responded

  
dwise1
Member
Posts: 3285
Joined: 05-02-2006
Member Rating: 7.5


Message 41 of 54 (782035)
04-14-2016 1:37 AM
Reply to: Message 40 by 1.61803
04-13-2016 4:44 PM


Re: a couple I liked
I am leaning German but it is a complex language. Didnt someone famous say, "Life is too short to learn German." ?

German's not that complex. Basically, English is German with a lot of French vocabulary slathered all over it. That means that learning German verbs is easier since the verb system is like in English (eg, sing, sang, sung and singen, sang, gesungen). The French verb system is a lot harder to learn since it is so unlike the verb system in English. But French vocabulary is easier because many of the words are the same (in English words ending in -ble and -nce all sound the same, but they sound different in French so when I was in practice I used their French pronunciation to figure out how to spell them), but German vocabulary is not as easy since only about 25% of English words are from Anglo-Saxon.

I think that quote might be Mark Twain from his "The Awful German Language."

Netflix also has a German documentary about the film industry in Weimar: "From Caligari to Hitler: German Cinema in the Age of the Masses".

I saw "M" in college (I was a German major). Lorre's line that I remember most was his defense, "Ich kann aber nichts dafür!" And there's a German shopping center in Torrance that, when I was in college (early 70's) had a Kino that showed a different pair of German movies every weekend. Though most of them didn't have subtitles, since most of the customers were from the local German community. Remember that Anaheim was founded by German immigrants and their Phoenix Club has been operating here for decades. Those movies were our only opportunity to hear German outside of class. Even when video stores appeared nearly two decades later, most of their foreign offerings would be French. Even with all its faults, Netflix is a welcome change.

Another movie on Netflix is "The Nasty Girl" (Das Schlechte Mädchen). What was so horrible about her? She wouldn't stop researching for the truth of what the town did during the Hitlerzeit.

If you search on German movies, you won't see it. I find that to be a big problem with Netflix. There was also a Moritz Bleibtreu movie, "My Best Enemy" (Mein Bester Feind), which is no longer available -- but it might come back so keep an eye out for it. It also wouldn't show up in the list of German movies. Really frustrating.

Early in "Look Who's Back", there's a scene where the receptionist has brought her pet rat (not white) to the office because she needed to take him to the vet after work. The conversation about the rat is different from what the subtitles say. Your wife can explain it.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 40 by 1.61803, posted 04-13-2016 4:44 PM 1.61803 has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 43 by 1.61803, posted 04-25-2016 10:22 AM dwise1 has responded

    
dwise1
Member
Posts: 3285
Joined: 05-02-2006
Member Rating: 7.5


Message 42 of 54 (782064)
04-15-2016 6:26 AM
Reply to: Message 40 by 1.61803
04-13-2016 4:44 PM


Female Agents -- SOE
Oh frak!

Special Operations Executive (SOE).
British organized. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Operations_Executive. "The organisation directly employed or controlled just over 13,000 people, about 3,200 of whom were women." The women they mainly used as couriers, many of whom gave their lives.

If you have been watching Agent Carter, her first assignment was to the SOE.

One agent, the sole survivor of her pre-D-Day mission, wrote her memoir which formed the core of the movie on Netflix, Female Agents (Les Femmes de L'Ombre -- "Women of the Shadow"). C'est en français, but watch it nonetheless.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 40 by 1.61803, posted 04-13-2016 4:44 PM 1.61803 has not yet responded

    
1.61803
Member
Posts: 2812
From: Lone Star State USA
Joined: 02-19-2004
Member Rating: 4.9


Message 43 of 54 (782505)
04-25-2016 10:22 AM
Reply to: Message 41 by dwise1
04-14-2016 1:37 AM


Re: a couple I liked
Hello dwise1,

quote:
German's not that complex.

Ok, not "that" complex. But complex enough to confound a simpleton like moi.

I finally watched "Look who's Back" I found it both amusing (laughed out loud many times.) And my wife found it entertaining as well.
Unsettling to say the least though; the director and writer managed to tap into such a wide array of emotions from all walks of life. The film seemed to show through comedy just how much remaining fear and horror of the holocaust still lies in a shallow grave of the world's consciousness. And even though there is laughter it is not a laughter of mirth and merriment but a nervous inappropriate laugh of one who is uncomfortable and not completely at peace with the subject matter.

So in that respect I found it to be a good thought provoking film.


"You were not there for the beginning. You will not be there for the end. Your knowledge of what is going on can only be superficial and relative" William S. Burroughs

This message is a reply to:
 Message 41 by dwise1, posted 04-14-2016 1:37 AM dwise1 has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 44 by dwise1, posted 04-26-2016 3:06 AM 1.61803 has responded

  
dwise1
Member
Posts: 3285
Joined: 05-02-2006
Member Rating: 7.5


(1)
Message 44 of 54 (782558)
04-26-2016 3:06 AM
Reply to: Message 43 by 1.61803
04-25-2016 10:22 AM


Re: a couple I liked
Ok, not "that" complex. But complex enough to confound a simpleton like moi.

quote:
Lessing: Man kennt die eigene Sprache nicht, bis man eine fremde Sprache lernt.

Quoted from memory from four decades ago. For monoglots, grammar is just a bunch of dumb arbitrary rules where what everybody normally says is supposed to be wrong. You already know how to speak English, so you approach English grammar as a bunch of rules you have to memorize in order to pass the next test: you just write what sounds right and memorize the exceptions where what sounds right isn't supposed to be right. But when you learn a foreign language you discover what a wonderfully useful thing grammar really is. Grammar is the key to the language, the description of how the language works. In two years of high school German, I learned far more about English grammar than I ever did in twelve years of English classes. Man kennt die eigene Sprache nicht, ... .

Is German your first foreign language? The first one is usually the hardest, because you also have to learn how to learn a language; each subsequent language tends to be easier because you now have skills and knowledge that is transferable. I even went from a foreign language major (BA German with classes in French, Spanish, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and Russian, plus a few more on the side -- I only have any proficiency in German, French, and Spanish, followed by a little very rudimentary Russian) to Computer Science in which I used my foreign language learning skills to learn my first programming languages.

I already talked about the verb systems in English (a West Germanic language, as is German) and German being very similar. But only about 25% of English vocabulary is related to German (ignoring the French words that German also borrowed), so vocabulary learning is a bit more difficult. Read up on the Second Sound Shift (die zweite Lautverschiebung) which had only made it up to Köln. Hochdeutsch uses the southern consonants, which were affected by the sound shift, which changed from what they still are in the north and in Dutch and in English. Knowing those changes will help you recognize more cognates, words in the two languages that are similar because they are related (eg, Tier and deer, which even in Shakespeare's time referred to small animals).

There's also case, wherein nouns are changed to reflect how they are used in the sentence. Russian still has it, as did Latin and classical Greek, but most other Indo-European (AKA Indogermanisch) languages have largely lost it except in the personal pronouns. German still has it in the definite article and in adjective endings (AKA "declination" as in Mark Twain's outburst, "I've much rather decline a drink than a damned German adjective!"). That actually makes things much easier for you as a listener. It also allows spoken German to become much more terse and condensed. I was watching a German TV movie version of "Valkyre" and there was a scene at the family dinner table where the conversation was in small fragments that all made perfect sense in German, but which had the subtitles scrambling to keep up.

I have three pet peeves about monoglot native English speakers:


  1. Minor peeve -- on a programming forum, we'd get people from anywhere in the world. The non-native members wrote the best English, albeit sometimes a bit odd or with weird word-choices (eg, one Portuguese programming asked how to use lights in multithreaded programming. He was actually asking about semaphores, but when he looked up semáforo in the dictionary, it said "light" as in "traffic light". I explained it to him and referred him to his new best friend for specialized vocabularies, Wikipedia's "Languages" column). The absolute worst and indecipherable messages were always by native speakers, especially the SMS generation. One native speaker wanted C code for a Barber Poll, which I assumed was some statistical method for gathering data. No, he wanted graphics code that would simulate a barber pole. Made me want to reach out through the wires and slap some sense into him.
  2. Another minor peeve, but it's been going on for decades and, I suspect, is the source of all those idiotic "choose the right word" "English grammar" exercises in primary and secondary school. i do not remember having learned to read -- our younger son just started reading on his own around 3 or 4. I have heard of people complaining about phonetic reading and I remember the exercises in school of associating certain sounds with certain letters. But I've always read whole words as they are. In 3rd or 4th grade, I was reading out aloud and hit a word I didn't know and the teacher tried to guide me through trying to sound it out, but I still had a difficult time doing that. I still read words instead of sounding them out (I had no idea what dwise1 sounded like until a co-worker pointed it out to me -- look at the bottom of the index page of my website at http://dwise1.net/ for the full story), so when someone uses "your" instead of "you're" I become very confused for a minute or two. "Dammit, man! It's your language! Learn to use it already!"
  3. Case. Theoretically, in Proto-Indo-European (auch Proto-Indogermanisch), there were eight cases and no prepositions:

    1. nominative (the subject of the sentence, the actor of the action),
    2. vocative (how you address someone, hence Brutus (nom.) was addressed in the vocative in the famous Shakespearian line "Et tu, Brute?"),
    3. genitive to indicate possession, accusative to indicate the direct object of the action of the sentence (as indicated by the verb),
    4. dative to indicate the indirect object which is to say the benefactor of the action (ich gebe dem Knaben das Buch -- I gave the book to the boy),
    5. accusative being the direct object, the direct recipient of the action,
    6. instrumental being the means of the action (I cut the Schnitzl with the knife),
    7. ablative indicating motion away (mainly only Latin examples still exist),
    8. locative indicating location, that the action is taking place within some place,

    As languages simplified, cases started collapsing into one another and new words, prepositions, came into use to distinguish meaning. Ablative tended to merge in with the genetive, vocative with the nominative, and locative and instrumental merged with the dative. Hence we have "Ich laufe ins Haus" for "I'm running into the house" as opposed to "Ich laufe im Hause." for "I'm running inside the house." In Old English (I audited a semester), we still had four cases though actually five since the instrumental was still merging into the dative at that time. Otherwise, ostensibly under the influence of case-free North-Germanic languages (the Danes in England -- immediately before his 1066 defeat at the Battle of Hastings, King Harold had just fought and won against the Danes in the north) Old English was under Norse influence to lose its inflection (ie, changing the words to reflect what their case is).

    Now here is my pet peeve: modern-day English speakers have no sense of case. Prime example: "just between you and I". That should have been, "just between you and me". In English, prepositions call for using the "objective case". How's about "Are you coming with me?" What about "Are you coming with him and I?" That is what's being said now, even though it should be "Are you coming with him and me?" And the really scary part is that I have even seen the British making the same mistake. So now even the British have forgotten how to speak English?

    My attitude is that English speakers need to be required to learn German so that they can understand case.


I have also found spoken German to be much easier to follow than spoken French. In French everything runs together, whereas in German alles ist klip und klar.

Also, in my German classes we were taught that young children are hard-wired to learn language, but then around puberty that wiring gets messed up so it becomes harder for adults to learn a foreign language. I think that personal pride and self-consciousness must also play a part as we become afraid to make a mistake, something you cannot avoid in language learning. I married into a Mexican family in which my in-laws provided day-care while my wife and I worked. As a result, both our sons (and their four cousins from my two sisters-in-law) grew up knowing both English and Spanish, though they were reluctant to try to speak it. I remember one night I was alone at home so I started watching Ghostbusters in Spanish. My sons and their mother returned and my older son saw what was on and sat down to watch. After at least five minutes, he started to get a puzzled look on his face and then he finally figured out that it wasn't in English. I saw that as a mark of his fluency with Spanish. Similarly, almost as soon as my niece learned to speak she had also worked out which of her grandmothers spoke English and which spoke Spanish -- young children are lean, mean learning machines! My father had spent part of his childhood in Texas and my son (at 3 or 4 years old) would get mad at him whenever he used any Spanish, because he was supposed to speak English. Along the same lines, I tried speaking German to our first son, but he paid no attention to it; instead, he always paid close attention to what two adults were speaking to each other. I thought that to be very interesting.

BTW, I already mentioned that there used to be German communities in my area. On NPR some years ago I heard a report on old dance halls in Texas and that they were associated with German communities there. Not quite related is the story of Lawrence Welk who grew up in North Dakota but who mainly spoke German until he left home to pursue his music career. I don't know anything about the distribution of German communities in Texas now where in Texas you live, but if you look around you might find some communities that you could tap into.

An embassy (USA embassy in German?) produced an excellent brochure about Mark Twain's "The Awful German Language" that contains the original, a German translation, and a number of letters by Mark Twain "in German" that are "a hoot and a half" for anyone bilingual in English and German to read. Unfortunately, it's now been place behind some weird kind of Google sign-in wall. I will post it on my site and give you the URL, international diplomatic considerations be damned!

I finally watched "Look who's Back"

I think the film's message was driven home hard in the end in which the rightest demonstrations are shown as Henry Purcell's Music for the Funeral of Queen Mary plays (which was also the title music to Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange). Last summer I got a new car with Sirius XM, so I've been listening to the Insight Channel (121), a kind of leftist talk radio. Some months ago on one show, they were commenting on the situation in Europe. For centuries, European nations have been monolithic, have consisted of basically one kind of culture and ethnicity. For decades, Europe has been laughing at the USA's on-going problems with race relations and cultural diversity. Now suddenly they are themselves facing the exact same problems and it's tearing them apart such that we are seeing a resurgence of far-right political forces.

What had struck me were the parallels between Hitler's street conversations with every-day Germans and the Donald Trump campaign.

When I was in Germany in 1973, there was a Dritte Reich magazine (you could also order Schallplatten). One issue had an article which used a quote from Hitler: "Gott, ich konnte aber reden!" A subsequent documentary talked about how Hitler would plan out all his speeches and every gesture he would use. And certainly we have all seen his over-the-top mass speech performances (which in one German movie ... this one? ... I have heard described as "over the top"), but that wasn't in any of his speeches in this movie. They were all directed to smaller groups, so the restraint makes more sense to me.

Did your wife explain a couple jokes to you? The comedian host of the show that Hitler appeared on was named Michael Witzigmann -- "funny man". And when Sawatzki first encounters Franziska Krömeier pet rat she had brought to work to take to the vet later. He assumed the rat was pregnant but she informs him that those are his "Eier" (eggs) and he's confused into thinking that rats lay eggs. Sorry, I was listening to the German instead of reading the subtitles. Did your wife explain to you that testicles are called Eier in German? Apparently for sharing the same general size, shape, and fragility.

Perhaps Hitler's conversation with Sawatzki on the roof-top contains the film's message. Sawatzki cannot kill Hitler, because Hitler is a part of him, of us. We cannot get rid of him. 60 years later and we see the same messages from Donald Trump.

Here's another Netflix movie, Experimenter. Stanley Milgram's infamous psychological experiments where subjects would willingly administer lethal electrical shocks under the direction of an authority figure in a white lab coat -- Wir befolgten bloss unsere Befehle. A really scary part of that is that fundamentalist Christian morality operates on the exact same level.

Are you also a Star Trek fan? An independent company is working on a new Star Trek film, "Star Trek: Axanar". They produced a trailer for it, a mock-historical documentary, "Prelude to Axanar", about the Federation's "Four Year War" with the Klingon Empire leading up to the final decisive battle at Axanar (in the heart of Federation space, less than 11 light years from Terra and within striking range of the other principal planets). Incredibly excellent production quality. CBS and Paramount are taking legal action, but we wants "Star Trek: Axanar".


This message is a reply to:
 Message 43 by 1.61803, posted 04-25-2016 10:22 AM 1.61803 has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 46 by 1.61803, posted 04-26-2016 3:56 PM dwise1 has responded
 Message 47 by Son Goku, posted 04-27-2016 1:41 PM dwise1 has not yet responded

    
Tanypteryx
Member
Posts: 1962
From: Oregon, USA
Joined: 08-27-2006
Member Rating: 7.2


Message 45 of 54 (782602)
04-26-2016 11:45 AM


two comedies
I like comedies and mysteries.

Bagdad Café is one of my faorites.

quote:
(also known as Out of Rosenheim) is a 1987 German film directed by Percy Adlon. It is a comedy set in a remote truck-stop café and motel in the Mojave Desert in the US state of California. It centers on two women who have recently separated from their husbands, and the blossoming friendship that ensues. It runs 95 minutes in the U.S. and 108 minutes in the German version.

One of the things that I liked was a haunting song, Calling You, by Jevetta Steele.

.

The other comedy that I remember (and always laugh at the memories) is The Frisco Kid.

quote:
The Frisco Kid is a 1979 movie directed by Robert Aldrich. The movie is a Western comedy featuring Gene Wilder as Avram Belinski, a Polish rabbi who is traveling to San Francisco, and Harrison Ford as a bank robber who befriends him.

What if Eleanor Roosevelt had wings? -- Monty Python

One important characteristic of a theory is that is has survived repeated attempts to falsify it. Contrary to your understanding, all available evidence confirms it. --Subbie

If evolution is shown to be false, it will be at the hands of things that are true, not made up. --percy


    
Prev12
3
4Next
Newer Topic | Older Topic
Jump to:


Copyright 2001-2018 by EvC Forum, All Rights Reserved

™ Version 4.0 Beta
Innovative software from Qwixotic © 2019