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Author Topic:   A frog with a doubled genome
PaulK
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(1)
Message 1 of 4 (793119)
10-21-2016 3:28 AM


17 millions of years ago a frog acquired an extra genome. Since then evolution has removed some of the copied genes, and kept others around.

What happens when you end up with an extra genome

That beats gene duplication.

Read the article, it really is fascinating.


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 Message 2 by jar, posted 10-21-2016 11:13 AM PaulK has not yet responded
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jar
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Message 2 of 4 (793124)
10-21-2016 11:13 AM
Reply to: Message 1 by PaulK
10-21-2016 3:28 AM


What is really interesting to me is the evidence of evolution of different species that then later merged to become one new species.

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RAZD
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Message 3 of 4 (793164)
10-22-2016 11:51 AM
Reply to: Message 2 by jar
10-21-2016 11:13 AM


big gain in genetic material.
... evidence of evolution of different species that then later merged to become one new species.

One of the advantages the frogs would have is that the first batch would have numerous offspring to then mate with.

They would have to be closely related species, or actually sub-species, (by definition of species) to mate.

I think of horse and donkey and similar occurring -- such offspring would need to mate with either parent type.

There certainly is not a loss of genetic material in this situation ...

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Pressie
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From: Pretoria, SA
Joined: 06-18-2010
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Message 4 of 4 (793402)
10-28-2016 5:57 AM
Reply to: Message 1 by PaulK
10-21-2016 3:28 AM


One thing that got me thinking here is whether the creationists would tell us whether to call this "more" or "less" genetic information. They're yuuuuge on that. And then they should tell us how to measure it!
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