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Author Topic:   Science Programs on Radio, TV and Internet
macaroniandcheese 
Suspended Member (Idle past 371 days)
Posts: 4258
Joined: 05-24-2004


Message 76 of 115 (428710)
10-17-2007 11:33 AM
Reply to: Message 75 by NosyNed
10-17-2007 10:53 AM


Re: Quirks --Fisheries Disaster, 800 teeth and mummy dinners
oh but fishies are so yummy.
This message is a reply to:
 Message 75 by NosyNed, posted 10-17-2007 10:53 AM NosyNed has not yet responded

  
Kitsune
Member (Idle past 744 days)
Posts: 788
From: Leicester, UK
Joined: 09-16-2007


Message 77 of 115 (428724)
10-17-2007 12:28 PM
Reply to: Message 75 by NosyNed
10-17-2007 10:53 AM


Re: Quirks --Fisheries Disaster, 800 teeth and mummy dinners
If you like this Ned, then you might like these. I'm not sure if they are available as podcasts, but you can listen to them because they are archived on the "Listen Again" section of BBC Radio Four, which is similar to NPR in the US.

Frontiers: Peter Evans explores new ideas in science, meeting researchers who challenge existing theories and their critics.

Most recent: Climate change

Leading Edge: Discoveries, debates, hot topics and news reports from the world of science. Presented by Geoff Watts.

Most recent: Wet weather, Pterosaurs, students uncover clues in mass grave, Leonardo's great lady

The Material World: Quentin Cooper and his live studio guests discuss the latest scientific investigations and research findings.

Most recent: Nobel Prize for Medicine, The Peppered Moth


This message is a reply to:
 Message 75 by NosyNed, posted 10-17-2007 10:53 AM NosyNed has not yet responded

    
NosyNed
Member
Posts: 8586
From: Canada
Joined: 04-04-2003


Message 78 of 115 (430298)
10-24-2007 11:20 AM


Quirks -- Global Warming faster
This Week on Quirks & Quarks:

The Warming Heats Up.

The climate change news lately has not been good. From Arctic sea ice to northern permafrost, the signs of global warming seem to be more severe than scientists had expected. Now a new study of carbon emissions has shown that we're emitting carbon dioxide faster than predicted, and Nature's not doing as good a job at absorbing it as we thought she would. As a result, carbon emissions are not just rising, they're accelerating. So, in more ways than one, we've got our foot on the gas pedal.

Plus, the world's oldest reptile fossil; and the geometry of turtle turning.

All this and more, Saturday right after the noon news on Radio One, or anytime on our web page.

Bob McDonald
Host

Don't forget to check out our new Quirks blog: http://www.cbc.ca/technology/quirks-blog/
Or subscribe to our Quirks podcast: http://www.cbc.ca/quirks/podcast.html


  
NosyNed
Member
Posts: 8586
From: Canada
Joined: 04-04-2003


Message 79 of 115 (432651)
11-07-2007 3:30 PM


Quirks Nov 10 - The beginning of the Big Bang
This Week on Quirks & Quarks: www.cbc.ca/quirks

Before the Big Bang.

The origins of the universe may be mind-boggling and difficult to understand. Physicists seem to agree on events that happened from about one second after it all began, but when we get to the Big Bang itself, physics breaks down and no one really knows what happened, or how. So today, researchers are turning to study the moment of the Big Bang, and even what came before it. From hot soups of string to a cosmic crash, we'll look at the latest ideas for the origins of our Universe.

Plus - fish fail school with a chemical curriculum.

All this and more on Quirks & Quarks, Saturday right after the noon news on Radio One, or anytime on our web page.

Bob McDonald
Host

Don't forget to check out our new Quirks blog: http://www.cbc.ca/technology/quirks-blog/
Or subscribe to our Quirks podcast: http://www.cbc.ca/quirks/podcast.html


  
NosyNed
Member
Posts: 8586
From: Canada
Joined: 04-04-2003


Message 80 of 115 (434086)
11-14-2007 11:41 AM


Quirks and Quarks, Nov 17 -- contrarian diet views
This Week on Quirks & Quarks:

Good Calories, Bad Calories.

What if every piece of medical advice you'd ever heard about food, dieting and exercise was fundamentally wrong? What if the solution to today's obesity epidemic was not to eat less and exercise more? What if butter and lard might actually save you from heart disease? Well, that's the premise at the heart of a controversial new book by science writer, Gary Taubes. He looks at the history of obesity research and public health, and finds a startling picture. He claims there's no proof that eating fatty foods has any relationship to obesity or heart disease, and that our current diet advice may actually be what's causing us to gain weight.

Plus - chocolate beer: how the Aztec's ancestors altered their alcohol ...

All this and more on Quirks & Quarks, Saturday right after the noon news on Radio One, or anytime on our web page.

Bob McDonald
Host

Don't forget to check out our new Quirks blog: http://www.cbc.ca/technology/quirks-blog/
Or subscribe to our Quirks podcast: http://www.cbc.ca/quirks/podcast.html


  
molbiogirl
Member (Idle past 623 days)
Posts: 1909
From: MO
Joined: 06-06-2007


Message 81 of 115 (434240)
11-15-2007 1:27 AM


Hey Ned.

Didja know you got a mention on Cosmic Variance?

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation has a smart and engaging radio show, Quirks & Quarks. Yesterday’s show focused on a big question: What happened at, and before, the Big Bang?

The physicists like you!


Replies to this message:
 Message 82 by NosyNed, posted 11-21-2007 10:56 AM molbiogirl has not yet responded

  
NosyNed
Member
Posts: 8586
From: Canada
Joined: 04-04-2003


Message 82 of 115 (435513)
11-21-2007 10:56 AM
Reply to: Message 81 by molbiogirl
11-15-2007 1:27 AM


Q and Q Nov 24 Climate Change
Well, not me personally. :) I guess that was the plural you eh?

This Week on Quirks & Quarks we present:

"Canada 2050": A Quirks & Quarks Climate Change Special

Disappearing polar ice, melting permafrost, extreme weather events, raging forest fires, changing landscapes - the recent news on climate change has not been good. And some scientists say it will get much worse before it can get better. But what does it mean for Canada?

In this special full-edition report, Quirks & Quarks looks at Canada in the year 2050, and tries to imagine what effect climate change will have on our land, its people, its animals and plants, its biodiversity and its weather patterns. We'll speak with a dozen of Canada's leading climate experts, and get their predictions for all regions of the country in 2050.

That's Quirks & Quarks, Saturday right after the noon news on Radio One, or anytime on our web page.

Bob McDonald
Host

Don't forget to check out our new Quirks blog: http://www.cbc.ca/technology/quirks-blog/
Or subscribe to our Quirks podcast: http://www.cbc.ca/quirks/podcast.html


This message is a reply to:
 Message 81 by molbiogirl, posted 11-15-2007 1:27 AM molbiogirl has not yet responded

  
NosyNed
Member
Posts: 8586
From: Canada
Joined: 04-04-2003


Message 83 of 115 (438802)
12-06-2007 10:46 AM


Q and Q 07 Dec 8 New Dino
This Week on Quirks & Quarks:

Dinosaur Roadkill.

Sometimes, even great scientists can miss the obvious. A hundred years ago, in the badlands of Alberta, there was a famous paleontologist hunting for dinosaur bones. One day, he went out, came across a skeleton sticking out of the rock, and decided it was too small and uninteresting to bother excavating. Almost a century later, a new group of scientists rediscovered the skeleton, pulled it out of the ground -and it turned out to be from a previously undiscovered species. It's larger and older than any of its known relatives, and fills an important gap in the fossil record. One man's roadkill is another's treasure.

Plus - Cosmic oddities: a super-duper nova, and a rocketing white dwarf.

All this and more, on Quirks & Quarks, Saturday right after the noon news on Radio One, or anytime on our web page.

Bob McDonald

Don't forget to check out our new Quirks blog: http://www.cbc.ca/technology/quirks-blog/
Or subscribe to our Quirks podcast: http://www.cbc.ca/quirks/podcast.html


  
NosyNed
Member
Posts: 8586
From: Canada
Joined: 04-04-2003


Message 84 of 115 (440291)
12-12-2007 1:19 PM


Q & Q 2007 Dec 15 books for xmas
www.cbc.ca/quirks

This Week on Quirks & Quarks it's our annual,

" Quirks Holiday Book Show".

From the worlds of palaeontology, nature and medicine, we'll look at 3 of our favourite science books from this season. First up is Heather Robertson's new biography of Joseph Tyrrell, one of this country’s most colourful explorers, and the discoverer of Albertasaurus - the first dinosaur skull found in Canada. Next is a conversation with West Coast photographer and naturalist Ian McAllister, about the wild wolves of the Great Bear Rainforest in BC. And finally, an interview with the author of Good Germs, Bad Germs - a book that examines our changing relationship with the microorganisms in our environment.

All this and more on Quirks & Quarks, Saturday right after the noon news on Radio One, or anytime on our web page.

Bob McDonald
Host
Don't forget to check out our new Quirks blog: http://www.cbc.ca/technology/quirks-blog/
Or subscribe to our Quirks podcast: http://www.cbc.ca/quirks/podcast.html


  
Percy
Member
Posts: 13230
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 1.9


Message 85 of 115 (445437)
01-02-2008 12:34 PM


Steven Novella Lecture on Scientific Skepticism
Steven Novella is an academic at Yale, president of the New England Skeptics Society, and host of the Skeptics Guide to the Universe podcast. He recently gave a lecture on the nature of scientific skepticism to the New York City Skeptics, and it's now available:

Steve Novella lecture audio now available

This is an audio, a video version of the lecture will be available soon.

There's some kind of Trojan at the NYC Skeptics site, so don't visit unless you have virus-scan software.

--Percy


    
NosyNed
Member
Posts: 8586
From: Canada
Joined: 04-04-2003


Message 86 of 115 (449862)
01-19-2008 1:53 PM


Quirks 2008 Jan 19
www.cbc.ca/quirks

January 19, 2008

Solving Syphilis

Medical historians have always assumed Christopher Columbus had more than the travel bug. It's long been thought he and his men brought back syphilis when they returned to Europe. It's a theory based on historical records, more than scientific evidence. However, Dr. Michael Silverman and his colleagues recently discovered genetic evidence that backs this up, while treating tropical diseases in Guyana. Dr. Silverman, an infectious diseases physician with the charitable organization Ve'ahavta and an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto, noticed peculiar skin sores on the arms and legs of children he was treating in the remote Guyanese jungles. The sores looked like syphilis, but he thought it was rather strange they were on the limbs and not the genitals. It turns out the sores were caused by a disease called yaws, which is caused by a non-venereal bacteria related to syphilis. Genetic tests of the Guyanese yaws revealed that it's likely to be the evolutionary ancestor of the infamous venereal disease. Dr. Silverman thinks Columbus and his men picked up yaws during their amorous liaisons with the New World natives. The disease was carried back to Europe where it quickly evolved into the virulent venereal bug we know today.

Squirrels Eating Snake Skin

When Barbara Clucas started her doctorate at UC Davis, her supervisor informed her of a strange phenomenon he'd observed. When California Ground Squirrels came across a spot where a rattlesnake had been lounging, the squirrel would start rubbing around and eating the grass where the rattler had been. Ms. Clucas wondered why ground squirrels would perform such maneuvers and decided to study this in more detail. Using discarded snake skins as bate, she was able to see ground squirrels chew up the skins, and then cover themselves in snake-scented saliva. Further research showed the squirrels were using the scent as a cloaking device to protect themselves from predatory rattlesnakes.

Seal Sounds

Just as you can tell whether someone comes from Brooklyn or Newfoundland by the way they speak, Weddell seals also have their own dialects. Dr. Jack Terhune, a biologist at the University of New Brunswick in Saint John, has been studying the vocalizations of Weddell seals off the coast of Antarctica. Dr. Terhune and his colleagues studied the sounds male seals make when they're defending their territory. Weddell seals make these sounds -- called trills -- by essentially humming incredibly loudly. Not only are trills loud (they can travel over 30 km underwater) and eerie, but they differ from region to region around the Antarctic continent. Dr. Terhune was surprised to find that even relatively close neighbors spoke different dialects, suggesting that the various seal clans don't do much social mixing.

Mistakes Were Made

The human mind has a built-in mechanism for helping us escape the painful psychological penalty of bad decisions - mistakes, in essence. The benefit of this is that we can make decisions without paralysis. The cost, on the other hand, is what psychologists Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson explore in their new book, Mistakes Were Made (but not by me): Why we justify Foolish Beliefs, Bad Decisions and Hurtful Acts. They look at why human decision-making predisposes us to sometimes make mistakes even worse by mechanisms of self-justification and confirmation bias - which causes us to reinforce our decisions and beliefs (even mistaken ones) ever more strongly. The implications of this for our personal lives, as well as for social structure and politics, they say, are important to understand. We spoke with Dr. Tavris, an independent social psychologist and writer.

Fact or Fiction: Too Cold to Snow

From time to time, we present a commonly held idea or popular saying - and ask a Canadian scientist to set us straight on whether we should believe it or not.

Today's popular aphorism: If the temperature outside is too low, it cannot snow.

With the answer is Dr. Glen Lesins at Dalhousie University’s Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science.


Replies to this message:
 Message 87 by NosyNed, posted 01-23-2008 4:29 PM NosyNed has responded

  
NosyNed
Member
Posts: 8586
From: Canada
Joined: 04-04-2003


Message 87 of 115 (450770)
01-23-2008 4:29 PM
Reply to: Message 86 by NosyNed
01-19-2008 1:53 PM


Quirks 2008 Jan 26
I'm linking these together to help find them.

www.cbc.ca/quirks

Stardust Update

Two years ago, NASA's Stardust Mission capsule returned to Earth, after gathering up particles from a comet's tail. Since then, researchers have been carefully analyzing the particles, trying to figure out just what Comet Wild2 was made of. It turns out that the comet material wasn't exactly what they'd expected. From particles that enter the Earth's atmosphere, we have a pretty good idea of what comet dust should look like. But what was found in the tail of Wild2 looked more like the dust you'd find in an asteroid. These results mean we need to revise our ideas about the differences between comets and asteroids. They may not be as different as we'd assumed. Dr. Hope Ishii, from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, led the team that made the latest discovery

Smith Cloud Collision

Not that you should be alarmed, but there's a gigantic object hurtling through space on a collision course with our galaxy, the Milky Way. Dr. Jay Lockman, Principle Scientist with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, West Virginia, has been studying the mysterious object, called the Smith Cloud. First discovered in the 1960's, it has puzzled and intrigued astronomers who, until now, haven't had a particularly clear view. Dr. Lockman, using a new and extremely powerful radio telescope, was able to create high-definition images of the Smith Cloud which, it turns out, is a comet-shaped mass of hydrogen gas about 11, 000 light years long and 8, 000 light-years wide. It'll take another 10 to 20 million years before we really feel the crunch. But, when it finally does gets here, we can expect some fireworks.

Jurassic Teen Moms

We tend to frown upon teen pregnancies but it wasn't always so. If you look back in history -- very far back -- it seems to have been the preferred reproductive approach. Sarah Werning, a PhD. student with the Museum of Paleontology at the University of California, Berkeley, has been studying the fossilized bones of three species of dinosaur, looking for clues to their age and reproductive physiology. She's found evidence that dinosaurs, like humans, were sexually mature while they were still adolescents. Unlike humans, however, teen pregnancy was probably desirable. Ms. Werning says that because many species, such as T-Rex, took up to 20 years to reach their adult weight and only lived to about 25 or 30, it made sense to get a early start on baby-making.

Antarctic Volcano

The British Antarctic Survey has been flying routine surveying missions over the western Antarctic ice sheets for several years. They've covered the area pretty thoroughly, so it might sound odd that they've only recently discovered a volcano. But, explains David Vaughan, a glaciologist with the BAS, it wasn't the easiest thing to spot, given that it's buried under several hundred meters of ice. Dr. Vaughan and his colleagues recently discovered the volcano when radar images revealed a layer of volcanic ash, like a layer of icing in a wedding cake, buried half-way down in the ice. Beneath the ice, says Dr. Vaughan, is a tuya, a flat-topped volcano, like the kind found under the glaciers in Iceland. It turns out that the volcano in Antarctica last erupted during the lifetime of Alexander the Great and sent a plume of ash and steam about 12 kilometers into the sky.

Ants Look Berry Nice

Dr Stephen Yanoviak and his colleagues were studying a species of gliding ants in Panama when one of them noticed something strange. Some of the ants had bright red hind-ends, and were waving them in the air. When they examined the ants in the lab, they discovered that these ants were infected with parasitic nematode roundworms. Their research is now suggesting that these worms are causing the ants to change colour and change their behaviour, so they'll be mistaken for berries by birds, who then eat the ants and spread the nematode eggs around the jungle. The ants then bring the bird feces back to feed to their larvae, and the parasitic cycle continues. Dr. Yanoviak is a tropical insect ecologist at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Hot Insect Sex

For many male creatures, the colour of their surface is a way to let females know just how sexy they are. This has led to developments such as the peacock's tail, the red breast of the robin, and many others. So when Dr. David Punzalan, from the University of Ottawa, began studying Ambush Bugs, he expected to find a similar situation. Male Ambush Bugs have dark brown or black patches on their heads, while females don't, and darker headed males are more successful at securing mates. But when Dr. Punzalan tested the females to see which males they preferred, the females didn't show any preference. What Dr. Punzalan went on to discover is that the darker males heat up faster on cold days, thanks to the dark patches acting like solar panels. This extra heating gives these males an advantage at finding the females and increasing their own reproductive success.

Edited by NosyNed, : fill in the details


This message is a reply to:
 Message 86 by NosyNed, posted 01-19-2008 1:53 PM NosyNed has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 88 by NosyNed, posted 01-26-2008 11:41 AM NosyNed has not yet responded
 Message 91 by NosyNed, posted 02-02-2008 1:44 PM NosyNed has responded

  
NosyNed
Member
Posts: 8586
From: Canada
Joined: 04-04-2003


Message 88 of 115 (451120)
01-26-2008 11:41 AM
Reply to: Message 87 by NosyNed
01-23-2008 4:29 PM


Re: Quirks 2008 Jan 26 bump with updates
Just to show the details of today's show.
This message is a reply to:
 Message 87 by NosyNed, posted 01-23-2008 4:29 PM NosyNed has not yet responded

  
Vacate
Member (Idle past 1044 days)
Posts: 565
Joined: 10-01-2006


Message 89 of 115 (451925)
01-29-2008 9:16 AM


Podcasts
The Skeptics Guide to the Universe

Podcast #131 1/23/2008
Special Guests Fraser Cain and Pamela Gay from Astronomy Cast
News Items: Texas UFO follow up, Mars Bigfoot, Homer on Mercury, Asteroid 2007 TU24, Bionic Eyes, Coast to Coast Gets Punked
Your Questions and E-mails: Restless Leg Syndrome, Time Travel, Relativity

I have listened to about 20 of these podcasts so far and they are excellent. Some great trinkets of science information to be found here.

Astronomycast

Ep. 73: Questions Show #8, January 28th, 2008
We’ve been so crazy following our own whims through the universe that we’ve neglected your questions. That ends today. It’s time to dig deep into our overflowing email box to retrieve the puzzling questions our listeners have sent in.

I just stumbled on this site the other day. I thought I would share it even though I haven't tested it out. It looks like it could be very good!


Replies to this message:
 Message 90 by Jazzns, posted 01-29-2008 11:52 AM Vacate has not yet responded

  
Jazzns
Member (Idle past 355 days)
Posts: 2657
From: A Better America
Joined: 07-23-2004


Message 90 of 115 (452003)
01-29-2008 11:52 AM
Reply to: Message 89 by Vacate
01-29-2008 9:16 AM


Re: Podcasts - everyone should listen to the SGU
I have listened to about 20 of these podcasts so far and they are excellent. Some great trinkets of science information to be found here.

Percy turned me onto these and seriously, they are probably the most entertaining radio/podcast experience I have had in my life to date. I just finished all the archives (wow what an endeavor). I would certainly recommend starting from the first one though and working your way up because there are some personal surprises that I think would screw you up if you did it backwards.


Of course, biblical creationists are committed to belief in God's written Word, the Bible, which forbids bearing false witness; --AIG (lest they forget)
This message is a reply to:
 Message 89 by Vacate, posted 01-29-2008 9:16 AM Vacate has not yet responded

  
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