Understanding through Discussion


Welcome! You are not logged in. [ Login ]
EvC Forum active members: 83 (8873 total)
Current session began: 
Page Loaded: 11-20-2018 6:07 AM
204 online now:
Minnemooseus (Adminnemooseus), PaulK, Tangle (3 members, 201 visitors)
Chatting now:  Chat room empty
Newest Member: Arkangel Daniel
Post Volume:
Total: 842,416 Year: 17,239/29,783 Month: 1,227/1,956 Week: 224/506 Day: 29/131 Hour: 0/0


Thread  Details

Email This Thread
Newer Topic | Older Topic
  
Author Topic:   Questions to evolutionists
extremophile
Member (Idle past 3549 days)
Posts: 53
Joined: 08-23-2003


Message 1 of 6 (66887)
11-16-2003 4:20 PM


But not the type of questions you was expecting to hear probably

- How many of you evolutionists are theists or deists?

(I think that one of the major troubles for some people on accepting descent with modification is that it's largely seen as an atheist thing (to not say that's considered even evil sometimes), I've heard once that evolution "starts by presupposing that god doesn't exist", which is instead a possible - not obligatory - inference from all the acquired data)

- Was anyone once a creationist? Of which type? What was the main arguments that lead you to a better comprehension of evolution?

- Has anyone convinced a firm creationist that evolution occurs? Tell us a bit on how you did it, please =O)

___________

I'm atheist, if someone was curious for some reason...

------------------

[This message has been edited by arrière pensée, 11-16-2003]

[This message has been edited by arrière pensée, 11-16-2003]


Replies to this message:
 Message 2 by Chiroptera, posted 11-16-2003 5:05 PM extremophile has responded

  
Chiroptera
Member
Posts: 6528
From: Oklahoma
Joined: 09-28-2003
Member Rating: 3.8


Message 2 of 6 (66897)
11-16-2003 5:05 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by extremophile
11-16-2003 4:20 PM


Hello, arriere.

quote:
How many of you evolutionists are theists or deists?

I'm not. Next question!

quote:
Was anyone once a creationist? Of which type? What was the main arguments that lead you to a better comprehension of evolution?

I've already answered this before, but I don't remember whether it was here, nor in which thread. But I don't mind answering it again.

The main reason I accepted evolution was that the Malthusian argument was completely logical; it is a fact that organisms reproduce far more than at mere replacement rates, so there had to be a lot of organisms that die without reproducing. And that there is variation between individuals in the species, and it's only logical that those whose characteristics are best suited to survive will be more likely to do so, and so there is a selection effect. And that genetics gives us a theory for heretibility, and a source of new variations (mutations). Add these all up, evolution has to be occurring right now - unless God has set up a magical barrier, there is nothing to prevent it. Then, I took another look at the fossil record....

quote:
Has anyone convinced a firm creationist that evolution occurs?

I know very few creationists in real life - the closest were a conservative baptist and a not-very-committed seventh day adventist, and neither really had a personal opinion on the matter nor any interest in the question. The baptist just didn't consider it a salvation issue at all, and the adventist was too busy trying to live a very un-Christian life (while still insisting on not doing any work on the Sabbath). I actually don't care enough to convince a creationist to accept evolution - I figure that their faith is their own business.

The main reason I am on these boards is that I am curious as to why so many people just refuse to accept the overwhelming evidence in favor of evolution. Also, because, as I stated above, I have a more than personal interest in the debate, and as I learn more, I find evolutionary biology simply fascinating - and I can't help but try to share it with others. Whether they agree with me that it's a beautiful theory, or whether they actually accept it, is up to them. Finally, there is a practical matter in that creationism is an important theological issue of a small group of zealots that would, if they could, force the rest of us into their beliefs - or at least force the rest of us to pretend we hold their beliefs. It is also an important issue in this country (the US) whether allow religious doctrines the public school class rooms.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 1 by extremophile, posted 11-16-2003 4:20 PM extremophile has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 3 by extremophile, posted 11-17-2003 7:42 AM Chiroptera has not yet responded

  
extremophile
Member (Idle past 3549 days)
Posts: 53
Joined: 08-23-2003


Message 3 of 6 (67017)
11-17-2003 7:42 AM
Reply to: Message 2 by Chiroptera
11-16-2003 5:05 PM


quote:
The main reason I am on these boards is that I am curious as to why so many people just refuse to accept the overwhelming evidence in favor of evolution. Also, because, as I stated above, I have a more than personal interest in the debate, and as I learn more, I find evolutionary biology simply fascinating - and I can't help but try to share it with others. Whether they agree with me that it's a beautiful theory, or whether they actually accept it, is up to them.
More or less the same with me. I think that some people refuses evolution based in misconceptions, and I like trying to clarify it. But oftenly I see some willingness to deny evolution, even from those which are supposedly trying to be scientifical. These are the most intriguing ones, because they don't show a clear zealotry as the cause of the denial. I consider that's important (besides entertaining at the same time) to debate with them in public forums to counter a bit their spreading of misconceptions around.

quote:
Finally, there is a practical matter in that creationism is an important theological issue of a small group of zealots that would, if they could, force the rest of us into their beliefs - or at least force the rest of us to pretend we hold their beliefs. It is also an important issue in this country (the US) whether allow religious doctrines the public school class rooms.
There's the same in Brazil nowadays -_-
I like the phrase "religion shouldn't be preached in schools as trigonometry isn't taught in churchs", I've seen it somewhere in the internet.
I've watched a video yesterday which in its end, the YECreationist presenting a seminar requests the bishops to taught "science" for children in the churchs... *sigh*
Ironically, I found all of his seminar content listed in a YEC site as the arguments that creationists shouldn't use.

[This message has been edited by arrière pensée, 11-17-2003]


This message is a reply to:
 Message 2 by Chiroptera, posted 11-16-2003 5:05 PM Chiroptera has not yet responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 4 by Habanero, posted 11-21-2003 5:13 PM extremophile has not yet responded

  
Habanero
Inactive Member


Message 4 of 6 (68416)
11-21-2003 5:13 PM
Reply to: Message 3 by extremophile
11-17-2003 7:42 AM


I agree with you both. Evolution is a interesting concept. When I was a young boy, and a Christian came up to me and told me that I should believe everything in the bible, I couldnt let myself do that. I cant put my whole belief in a book. I believe Jesus was a real person, but most of the rest of the bible is a way to guide you through life. I,ve entered this site to see what is everybody's opinion on these topics.
This message is a reply to:
 Message 3 by extremophile, posted 11-17-2003 7:42 AM extremophile has not yet responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 5 by sidelined, posted 11-21-2003 5:25 PM Habanero has responded

  
sidelined
Inactive Member


Message 5 of 6 (68421)
11-21-2003 5:25 PM
Reply to: Message 4 by Habanero
11-21-2003 5:13 PM


Habanero

Welcome to the forum. Abandon all hope of a return to your old way of life.LOL Glad to have someone new on board and I hope you enjoy your time here.
I am myself an atheist although unlike many I was never a believer in any great amount as my parents were both uninvolved with religion.
My spiritual support as I grew up was skiing.Nothing quite like being in powder snow with people out for a good time to give you a sense of purpose in life.

Now if only I had invested all that money I drank away.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 4 by Habanero, posted 11-21-2003 5:13 PM Habanero has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 6 by Habanero, posted 11-21-2003 7:20 PM sidelined has not yet responded

  
Habanero
Inactive Member


Message 6 of 6 (68441)
11-21-2003 7:20 PM
Reply to: Message 5 by sidelined
11-21-2003 5:25 PM


Thanks for the invite, sidelined. Myself, I,m still young( a Jr. in highschool) and my parents never forced a belief on me at all. I guess I am lucky for that. I accepted evolution as true, as did my parents.In fact, I would love to become a Paleontologist, or a Archeaologist and plan to follow that dream. But, at the same time, we are theists, also. The God we believe in is more of a creator of all things, and a totally loving, and passionate god. Yes, as a avid outdoor person, I have to agree with you there.lol Theres nothing like it.
This message is a reply to:
 Message 5 by sidelined, posted 11-21-2003 5:25 PM sidelined has not yet responded

  
Newer Topic | Older Topic
Jump to:


Copyright 2001-2015 by EvC Forum, All Rights Reserved

™ Version 4.0 Beta
Innovative software from Qwixotic © 2018