Understanding through Discussion


Welcome! You are not logged in. [ Login ]
EvC Forum active members: 110 (8738 total)
Current session began: 
Page Loaded: 04-25-2017 2:32 PM
396 online now:
Chatting now:  Chat room empty
Newest Member: Jayhawker Soule
Post Volume:
Total: 805,233 Year: 9,839/21,208 Month: 2,926/2,674 Week: 350/961 Day: 80/134 Hour: 7/12

Announcements: Reporting debate problems OR discussing moderation actions/inactions


Thread  Details

Email This Thread
Newer Topic | Older Topic
  
1
234Next
Author Topic:   Homeschooling
Nunquam
Junior Member (Idle past 2099 days)
Posts: 8
From: New Jersey, USA
Joined: 02-10-2009


Message 1 of 51 (549945)
03-11-2010 4:51 PM


Homeschooling is a tool that many fundamentalists use to combat the perceived "sinfulness" of a public education system that teaches evolution. Since creationism won't be taught to their children in school, they take matters into their own hands and begin educating their children from home. A 1999 survey by the National Center for Education Statistics (U.S.) found the majority of people homeschooled their child(ren) because

• They can give their child(ren) a better education at home
• There exists a poor learning environment at school
• They have an objection to what the school teaches
• Religious reasons

While none of them directly state it, all these reasons can be attributed to either objection to evolution or the absence of creationism in schools.

What is your take on homeschooling, when practiced by fundamentalist parents as an objection to the teaching of evolution in public school systems? Do you feel as if these children are getting deprived of a proper education? Are they being "brainwashed"? Should homeschooling be illegal, especially when implemented in this manner?
My curiosity of your opinions is driven by the fact that I was raised under these conditions. (I somehow managed to not grow up to be a creationist.)


Replies to this message:
 Message 3 by Granny Magda, posted 03-11-2010 5:26 PM Nunquam has responded
 Message 37 by Hyroglyphx, posted 03-12-2010 9:45 PM Nunquam has not yet responded

    
Admin
Director
Posts: 12428
From: EvC Forum
Joined: 06-14-2002
Member Rating: 2.3


Message 2 of 51 (549950)
03-11-2010 4:58 PM


Thread Copied from Proposed New Topics Forum
Thread copied here from the Homeschooling thread in the Proposed New Topics forum.
    
Granny Magda
Member (Idle past 34 days)
Posts: 2300
From: UK
Joined: 11-12-2007


Message 3 of 51 (549954)
03-11-2010 5:26 PM
Reply to: Message 1 by Nunquam
03-11-2010 4:51 PM


Recent Article on Homeschooling
Hi Nunquam,

I have to say I'm hostile to homeschooling. I'm not sure it should be banned, but it should probably be more closely regulated. Parents should have to prove that they are providing a meaningful education, rather than just teaching the Bible by rote. Sadly, I suspect that many homeschooled kids are being denied a real education, especially in science. At the very least, it's hard to believe that most parents have the wide-ranging expertise needed to teach all subjects at once. The lack of socialisation is also a concern. Kids need to meet other kids, of all backgrounds, because when they become adults, they'll need to live in the real world, not the cosy sanctuary their parents build for them.

Here's an interesting article on the topic;

quote:
Top home-school texts dismiss Darwin, evolution

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Home-school mom Susan Mule wishes she hadn't taken a friend's advice and tried a textbook from a popular Christian publisher for her 10-year-old's biology lessons.

Mule's precocious daughter Elizabeth excels at science and has been studying tarantulas since she was 5. But she watched Elizabeth's excitement turn to confusion when they reached the evolution section of the book from Apologia Educational Ministries, which disputed Charles Darwin's theory.

"I thought she was going to have a coronary," Mule said of her daughter, who is now 16 and taking college courses in Houston. "She's like, 'This is not true!'"


http://news.yahoo.com/..._on_re/us_rel_home_school_evolution

Mutate and Survive


This message is a reply to:
 Message 1 by Nunquam, posted 03-11-2010 4:51 PM Nunquam has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 4 by Nunquam, posted 03-11-2010 5:54 PM Granny Magda has responded

    
Nunquam
Junior Member (Idle past 2099 days)
Posts: 8
From: New Jersey, USA
Joined: 02-10-2009


Message 4 of 51 (549959)
03-11-2010 5:54 PM
Reply to: Message 3 by Granny Magda
03-11-2010 5:26 PM


Re: Recent Article on Homeschooling
Hi Granny,

Thank you for the response. I agree that it should be regulated. Most parents lack teaching degrees in one subject, let alone all of them. An interesting statistic though: in spite of the parents' lack of teaching credentials, homeschoolers fair better on standardized tests than their public school counterparts do. I'm not exactly sure why.
Regarding the lack of socialization, I think that the children are learning to be closed-minded by not being surrounded by differing opinions and worldviews. An example can be found in that article you posted:

quote:
"He probably knows it better than the kids who have been taught evolution all through public school," Polly Brown said. "But that is in order for him to understand both sides of that argument because he will face it throughout his higher education."

Despite the boy's "knowledge" of evolution, with the mom claiming that he knows more about it than the other kids do, he STILL doesn't accept it.
This message is a reply to:
 Message 3 by Granny Magda, posted 03-11-2010 5:26 PM Granny Magda has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 5 by Granny Magda, posted 03-11-2010 6:45 PM Nunquam has responded
 Message 6 by Taz, posted 03-11-2010 6:45 PM Nunquam has not yet responded

    
Granny Magda
Member (Idle past 34 days)
Posts: 2300
From: UK
Joined: 11-12-2007


Message 5 of 51 (549964)
03-11-2010 6:45 PM
Reply to: Message 4 by Nunquam
03-11-2010 5:54 PM


Re: Recent Article on Homeschooling
I think the kids' performance on standardised tests probably comes down to the extra time and attention homeschoolers get. In a regular school, a kid is lucky to get a few minutes with the tutor per class. With thirty or forty kids per class, it's gonna be tough to give them all the attention they deserve, especially in the areas they might find troublesome. I'd like to see those standardised tests on science subjects though...

Regarding the lack of socialization, I think that the children are learning to be closed-minded by not being surrounded by differing opinions and worldviews.

I agree. For my part, I hated school. I had a really miserable time, my teachers were often incompetent, some of them were a disgrace. Nonetheless, I am grateful that I had the experience. Without it, I'd probably be even more of an antisocial misanthrope than I already am!

Despite the boy's "knowledge" of evolution, with the mom claiming that he knows more about it than the other kids do, he STILL doesn't accept it.

Yeah, it's hard to see why creationist parents wouldn't want their kids to know about evolution. Know your enemy and all that. If they really have conviction in their beliefs, they should have nothing to fear.

Mutate and Survive


This message is a reply to:
 Message 4 by Nunquam, posted 03-11-2010 5:54 PM Nunquam has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 8 by Nunquam, posted 03-11-2010 7:17 PM Granny Magda has not yet responded

    
Taz
Member (Idle past 672 days)
Posts: 5069
From: Zerus
Joined: 07-18-2006


Message 6 of 51 (549965)
03-11-2010 6:45 PM
Reply to: Message 4 by Nunquam
03-11-2010 5:54 PM


Re: Recent Article on Homeschooling
Nunquam writes:

An interesting statistic though: in spite of the parents' lack of teaching credentials, homeschoolers fair better on standardized tests than their public school counterparts do. I'm not exactly sure why.


Give me a break. Public schools in the US tend to do not as well compared to homeschooled kids is because public schools have to take in ALL kinds of kids, everything from geniuses to stupids to the downright retards.

I remember about 20 years ago there was a real public hype about how US students didn't do as well with test scores as their foreign counterparts. It puzzled me for a long time and then when I went to college the answer literally stared at me in the face. Foreign students only studied one subject and they get tested in just that subject while American students have to study everything from science to math to history to literature. The foreign students at my college told me they were surprised that they had to take all the electives like English and History even though they majored in science.

In other words, the test scores are biased. The samples aren't comparable at all.

I have a friend who immigrated to the states when he was about 12. He said that back then he couldn't speak a word of English but had to take these standardized tests. You know what he did? He filled in random bubbles. Of course his test scores brought down the overall average of the public schools.

quote:
Regarding the lack of socialization, I think that the children are learning to be closed-minded by not being surrounded by differing opinions and worldviews. An example can be found in that article you posted:


I've talked to homeschooled people before. While I cannot say this is so to all cases out there, I can say that all the cases I talked to showed a remarkable lack of interest in current events. They all seem to be clueless when it comes to terminologies like scientology and world cup. You should talk to them sometime. You will very quickly become frustrated of explaining to them even the most commonly known things out there. I know I was frustrated after a while.

Added by edit.

I vaguely remember someone telling me about a homeschool teacher on here who almost drove everyone to madness by her ignorance and lack of grammar skills. Anyone know who I'm talking about?

Edited by Taz, : No reason given.

Edited by Taz, : No reason given.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 4 by Nunquam, posted 03-11-2010 5:54 PM Nunquam has not yet responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 18 by Shield, posted 03-12-2010 7:42 AM Taz has responded

  
hooah212002
Member (Idle past 285 days)
Posts: 3180
Joined: 08-12-2009


Message 7 of 51 (549967)
03-11-2010 7:06 PM


Homeschooling gives us people like Tim Tebow, who is soon to be (if not already) a household icon. The kid is a twat. He should be reason enough to not only heavily, I mean heavily, monitor homeschooling, but also legalize, worldwide, abortion.

Edited by hooah212002, : No reason given.


"Some people think God is an outsized, light-skinned male with a long white beard, sitting on a throne somewhere up there in the sky, busily tallying the fall of every sparrow. Others—for example Baruch Spinoza and Albert Einstein—considered God to be essentially the sum total of the physical laws which describe the universe. I do not know of any compelling evidence for anthropomorphic patriarchs controlling human destiny from some hidden celestial vantage point, but it would be madness to deny the existence of physical laws."-Carl Sagan

"On a personal note I think he's the greatest wrestler ever. He's better than Lou Thesz, Gorgeous George -- you name it."-The Hulkster on Nature Boy Ric Flair


Replies to this message:
 Message 12 by Flyer75, posted 03-11-2010 10:44 PM hooah212002 has responded
 Message 16 by Percy, posted 03-12-2010 6:37 AM hooah212002 has responded

    
Nunquam
Junior Member (Idle past 2099 days)
Posts: 8
From: New Jersey, USA
Joined: 02-10-2009


(1)
Message 8 of 51 (549971)
03-11-2010 7:17 PM
Reply to: Message 5 by Granny Magda
03-11-2010 6:45 PM


Re: Recent Article on Homeschooling
Granny Magda writes:

I think the kids' performance on standardised tests probably comes down to the extra time and attention homeschoolers get. In a regular school, a kid is lucky to get a few minutes with the tutor per class. With thirty or forty kids per class, it's gonna be tough to give them all the attention they deserve, especially in the areas they might find troublesome. I'd like to see those standardised tests on science subjects though...


That's true. Also, there're no classmates to distract them from studying.

Granny Magda writes:

Yeah, it's hard to see why creationist parents wouldn't want their kids to know about evolution. Know your enemy and all that. If they really have conviction in their beliefs, they should have nothing to fear.

Agreed. That's exactly why I proceeded to learn about it: I figured if it wasn't true, I could easily disprove it… I was wrong though.

Taz writes:

Give me a break. Public schools in the US tend to do not as well compared to homeschooled kids is because public schools have to take in ALL kinds of kids, everything from geniuses to stupids to the downright retards.

You know, I've never thought of that before. There is an obvious racial disparity in test scores. This disparity is virtually non-existent among homeschooled students though.

Taz writes:

I've talked to homeschooled people before. While I cannot say this is so to all cases out there, I can say that all the cases I talked to showed a remarkable lack of interest in current events. They all seem to be clueless when it comes to terminologies like scientology and world cup. You should talk to them sometime. You will very quickly become frustrated of explaining to them even the most commonly known things out there. I know I was frustrated after a while.


Being homeschooled, I can say that I'm an exception, but I know exactly what you're talking about. They also lack knowledge of things like pop culture – something that your average student loves talking about.
This message is a reply to:
 Message 5 by Granny Magda, posted 03-11-2010 6:45 PM Granny Magda has not yet responded

    
DevilsAdvocate
Member (Idle past 482 days)
Posts: 1548
Joined: 06-05-2008


Message 9 of 51 (549976)
03-11-2010 7:41 PM


Being a homeschool child myself for the last 4 years of highschool there seems to be some misunderstanding of the homeschool movement.

While yes, a large majority of homeschoolers, homeschool due to religious reasons this is not always the case. As far as their level of aptitude, it varies almost as much as does the aptitude of public or private schooled children. As as kid I remember meeting or hearing about some pretty stellar homeschoolers whose children went on to college, even Ivy league schools, at a very young age. However, I also met some kids who were dumber than a box of rocks.

What were the factors that explain this range of aptitude?

#1 The aptitude of the parent(s) who schooled them. Some were college educated with undergraduate, graduate and doctorate degrees while others barely graduated high school or were high school dropouts.

#2 Usually (though not always), the more religiously fundamental the parents were, the fewer real sciences (not creationism) and secular studies these children were exposed too.

I was fortunate enough to have both a mother and father who were college educated (father was retired Air Force and had a BA in Ministry, Master in Divinity, and a BA in Computer Science; mother attended Bible college and taken many courses in Child Psychology, History, Humanities and Archeology). My mother, though a Christian at the time, was not afraid to expose my brother and I to a wide variety of secular subjects and books. I read the gamet of classical books from Chaucer to Leo Tolstoy. In other words, a classical education. As a result of my mother's tutoring and self-education through high school, I was able to score a 29 on my ACT, a 1290 on my SAT and was granted a scholarship at a Christian Liberal Arts College studying pre-med.

Edited by DevilsAdvocate, : No reason given.

Edited by DevilsAdvocate, : No reason given.


“One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we've been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We're no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It is simply too painful to acknowledge -- even to ourselves -- that we've been so credulous.” - Carl Sagan, The Fine Art of Baloney Detection

"You can't convince a believer of anything; for their belief is not based on evidence, it's based on a deep seated need to believe." - Carl Sagan

"It is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring." - Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World


Replies to this message:
 Message 10 by Nunquam, posted 03-11-2010 8:06 PM DevilsAdvocate has responded

  
Nunquam
Junior Member (Idle past 2099 days)
Posts: 8
From: New Jersey, USA
Joined: 02-10-2009


Message 10 of 51 (549979)
03-11-2010 8:06 PM
Reply to: Message 9 by DevilsAdvocate
03-11-2010 7:41 PM


DevilsAdvocate writes:

Being a homeschool child myself for the last 4 years of highschool there seems to be some misunderstanding of the homeschool movement.
While yes, a large majority of homeschoolers, homeschool due to religious reasons this is not always the case. As far as their level of aptitude, it varies almost as much as does the aptitude of public or private schooled children. As as kid I remember meeting or hearing about some pretty stellar homeschoolers whose children went on to college, even Ivy league schools, at a very young age. However, I also met some kids who were dumber than a box of rocks.

Glad to meet another homeschooler. Don't worry, I understand the misconceptions – I know that there's variety among homeschooled people and that we're not all closed-minded clones. However, the fact that the majority of people homeschool their children because of religion leads me to believe that they're doing it for the wrong reasons… and they're doing them a great disservice by keeping them sheltered from mainstream science.

DevilsAdvocate writes:

#1 The aptitude of the parent(s) who schooled them. Some were college educated with undergraduate, graduate and doctorate degrees whiles others barely graduated high school or were high school dropouts.
#2 Usually (though not always), the more religiously fundamental the parents were, the fewer real sciences (not creationism) and secular studies the children were exposed too.


Don't you think this problem could be eliminated by ensuring that the parents are equipped to teach and are providing the right curriculum?

DevilsAdvocate writes:

My mother, though a Christian at the time, was not afraid to expose my brother and I to a wide variety of secular subjects and books.


It's good to hear they weren't fundies. I had to learn about evolution behind my parents' backs.
This message is a reply to:
 Message 9 by DevilsAdvocate, posted 03-11-2010 7:41 PM DevilsAdvocate has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 11 by DevilsAdvocate, posted 03-11-2010 9:14 PM Nunquam has not yet responded

    
DevilsAdvocate
Member (Idle past 482 days)
Posts: 1548
Joined: 06-05-2008


Message 11 of 51 (549991)
03-11-2010 9:14 PM
Reply to: Message 10 by Nunquam
03-11-2010 8:06 PM


Don't you think this problem could be eliminated by ensuring that the parents are equipped to teach and are providing the right curriculum?

I think well-educated and well-rounded/grounded parents are a crucial component to a decent homeschool education. Too many religious parents with little to no formal education outside of high school think they can give there children an education on par or exceeding public school education. Very few if any can.

A well-educated and informed parent can give a good education to there children (many of our founding fathers had this type of education). Going back to the classical system of education is a good way of accomplishing this i.e. critical thinking/logic/science/humanities/foreign language/english/math/etc.

Also realize, not all children can thrive with this type of educational system. Developing self-discipline and critical thinking skills on both the part of the parent and the child are crucial for success. Parents must act as teacher, principle, tutor, counselor and classmate. It is not easy.

Edited by DevilsAdvocate, : No reason given.

Edited by DevilsAdvocate, : No reason given.


“One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we've been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We're no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It is simply too painful to acknowledge -- even to ourselves -- that we've been so credulous.” - Carl Sagan, The Fine Art of Baloney Detection

"You can't convince a believer of anything; for their belief is not based on evidence, it's based on a deep seated need to believe." - Carl Sagan

"It is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring." - Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World


This message is a reply to:
 Message 10 by Nunquam, posted 03-11-2010 8:06 PM Nunquam has not yet responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 14 by purpledawn, posted 03-12-2010 5:15 AM DevilsAdvocate has responded

  
Flyer75
Member (Idle past 365 days)
Posts: 242
From: Dayton, OH
Joined: 02-15-2010


(1)
Message 12 of 51 (550006)
03-11-2010 10:44 PM
Reply to: Message 7 by hooah212002
03-11-2010 7:06 PM


Hooah,

Were you this angry as a child?

What kind of comment is that about Tim Teabow?

I could just as easily say that the public school system produces the likes of Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, and yes, the worldwide abortion comment would apply in this case also.

I don't agree with what probably 80% of the posters here say on various topics but you have a serious anger problem towards anything Christianity while you completely turn a blind eye to anything that a secularist might do. Also, you make ridiculous blanket statements such as this one and the one not too long ago about how nobody has ever killed in any other name but the name of God....did Harris and Klebold kill in the name of God??? I doubt it.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 7 by hooah212002, posted 03-11-2010 7:06 PM hooah212002 has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 13 by hooah212002, posted 03-11-2010 11:51 PM Flyer75 has not yet responded

    
hooah212002
Member (Idle past 285 days)
Posts: 3180
Joined: 08-12-2009


Message 13 of 51 (550012)
03-11-2010 11:51 PM
Reply to: Message 12 by Flyer75
03-11-2010 10:44 PM


Were you this angry as a child?

Toughen up champ. I'm not angry, you're just soft.

What kind of comment is that about Tim Teabow?

What do you care? It was meant to imply that he is a dumbass creationist because of his homeschooling.

I could just as easily say that the public school system produces the likes of Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, and yes, the worldwide abortion comment would apply in this case also.

but you see, my Tim Tebow reference was meant as a reference to his ignorance because he was taught religion, instead of school. I'm sorry if your avereage homeschooler is a fundy evangelical creo. He fits the stereotype perfectly.

but you have a serious anger problem towards anything Christianity

It only appears as being angry because i am attacking people of your ilk. you don't like it so you accuse me of being "angry" so as to play some sort of pity card. "big mean atheist (I'm surprisingly agnostic, actually) points out dumb things christians do. He's such a meanie!".

while you completely turn a blind eye to anything that a secularist might do.

I have requested, on more than one occasion, for any one of you to point out an event that you feel is representative of secularism/atheism that equals in nature the things I post. For example: show me someone who kills people IN THE NAME OF ATHEISM. I will galdly chastise them as well.

My gripe with christians when they do this sort of thing in the name of YHWH is that you people are the ones who claim to have moral authority. You people are the ones saying that without god, there can be no morals. So yea, I do have a gripe with religion, christianity in particular as it is the main religion I have to face. So sorry if I call you all on your bluff.

Also, you make ridiculous blanket statements such as this one and the one not too long ago about how nobody has ever killed in any other name but the name of God.

Show me where I said exactly that. I never once said any such thing. Stop lying.

did Harris and Klebold kill in the name of God??? I doubt it.

Red herring much?


"Some people think God is an outsized, light-skinned male with a long white beard, sitting on a throne somewhere up there in the sky, busily tallying the fall of every sparrow. Others—for example Baruch Spinoza and Albert Einstein—considered God to be essentially the sum total of the physical laws which describe the universe. I do not know of any compelling evidence for anthropomorphic patriarchs controlling human destiny from some hidden celestial vantage point, but it would be madness to deny the existence of physical laws."-Carl Sagan

"On a personal note I think he's the greatest wrestler ever. He's better than Lou Thesz, Gorgeous George -- you name it."-The Hulkster on Nature Boy Ric Flair


This message is a reply to:
 Message 12 by Flyer75, posted 03-11-2010 10:44 PM Flyer75 has not yet responded

    
purpledawn
Member (Idle past 838 days)
Posts: 4453
From: Indiana
Joined: 04-25-2004


Message 14 of 51 (550026)
03-12-2010 5:15 AM
Reply to: Message 11 by DevilsAdvocate
03-11-2010 9:14 PM


Social Skills
quote:
I will have to say my social skills as a young adult were rather lacking after the homeschool experience coupled with the constant moving. As a result, it has taken me a good 17+ years in the US Navy to help make up for it.
I feel social skills are also dependent on personality.

I felt mentally tormented by some fellow students throughout grade school. Consequently, I was a loner throughout high school. I had poor social skills. Pretty much a wall flower. A stint in the Marine Corps helped me. Oddly enough I ended up in the Public Affairs Office.

My social skills are still not the best, but I'm old enough now I don't care. I stink at BS and am not much for one-upmanship, so I'm rather quiet in new encounters. I take too long editing what I'm going to say before I say it. In some cases that's good and in some not so much. I'm waiting for when I hit 70 or 80 and whatever I think just pops out of my mouth unedited.


Scripture is like Newton’s third law of motion—for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.
In other words, for every biblical directive that exists, there is another scriptural mandate challenging it.
-- Carlene Cross in “The Bible and Newton’s Third Law of Motion”

This message is a reply to:
 Message 11 by DevilsAdvocate, posted 03-11-2010 9:14 PM DevilsAdvocate has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 15 by DevilsAdvocate, posted 03-12-2010 6:01 AM purpledawn has responded

  
DevilsAdvocate
Member (Idle past 482 days)
Posts: 1548
Joined: 06-05-2008


Message 15 of 51 (550028)
03-12-2010 6:01 AM
Reply to: Message 14 by purpledawn
03-12-2010 5:15 AM


Re: Social Skills
PD writes:

I feel social skills are also dependent on personality.
I felt mentally tormented by some fellow students throughout grade school. Consequently, I was a loner throughout high school. I had poor social skills. Pretty much a wall flower. A stint in the Marine Corps helped me. Oddly enough I ended up in the Public Affairs Office.

My social skills are still not the best, but I'm old enough now I don't care. I stink at BS and am not much for one-upmanship, so I'm rather quiet in new encounters. I take too long editing what I'm going to say before I say it. In some cases that's good and in some not so much. I'm waiting for when I hit 70 or 80 and whatever I think just pops out of my mouth unedited.

Being a middle child with 2 brothers and a sister, a military kid who moved over 10 times by the time I was 18, and an introvert bookworm are not a good combination to being the most socially adept person out there. Though I am amiable, optimistic and upbeat I am still not a social animal like my wife is. I can hold my own in conversations but definately get my energy from "me time" vice "time spent with friends" like my wife.

I have learned to balance my personal thoughts and my outward speach but it is not a trait that comes naturally to me. I am a INTJ (Introverted Intuitive Thinking Judging) personality (same as Thomas Jefferson, JFK and C.S. Lewis).

Hey this would make a good start of a thread: What Personality Profile are you. Will start this later today.

Edited by DevilsAdvocate, : No reason given.


“One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we've been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We're no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It is simply too painful to acknowledge -- even to ourselves -- that we've been so credulous.” - Carl Sagan, The Fine Art of Baloney Detection

"You can't convince a believer of anything; for their belief is not based on evidence, it's based on a deep seated need to believe." - Carl Sagan

"It is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring." - Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World


This message is a reply to:
 Message 14 by purpledawn, posted 03-12-2010 5:15 AM purpledawn has responded

Replies to this message:
 Message 17 by purpledawn, posted 03-12-2010 7:15 AM DevilsAdvocate has not yet responded

  
1
234Next
Newer Topic | Older Topic
Jump to:


Copyright 2001-2015 by EvC Forum, All Rights Reserved

™ Version 4.0 Beta
Innovative software from Qwixotic © 2017