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Author Topic:   Validity of Radiometric Dating
Pollux
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Posts: 274
Joined: 11-13-2011


(1)
Message 199 of 207 (850873)
04-15-2019 9:51 PM


seamount and volcano chains
The correlation of dates of volcanoes in seamount chains and land based volcanoes with distance travelled from a hot spot is good evidence for the validity of RM dating. The H-E chain is a great example.

YEC can say only the "right"dates get published.

Does anyone here have references for relevant dates from the 60s and early 70s before plate tectonics was accepted? A date which was found after publication to be consistent with distance travelled would be quite telling.


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 Message 200 by dwise1, posted 04-15-2019 10:23 PM Pollux has not yet responded

  
Pollux
Member
Posts: 274
Joined: 11-13-2011


(2)
Message 207 of 207 (881805)
08-31-2020 8:12 AM
Reply to: Message 206 by Dredge
08-30-2020 10:42 PM


Re: Index fossils
I think geologists are often very interested in getting accurate dates. One reads often a statement about high precision dating methods being used to refine the dating of events.
For instance careful work has been done to refine the order of the eruption of the Deccan Traps compared to the Chicxulub meteorite and the End-Cretaceous extinction. Also similarly to see the exact relation between the Siberian Traps eruptions and the End-Permian extinction.

A great amount was known about the order of fossils before RMD was available. Now they have been dated, knowing the fossil can give you the date without needing a RMD test.

An example of index fossils is the use of a succession of about 40 different ammonites to delineate time zones for about 40,000,000 years of the first half of the Cretaceous.


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 Message 206 by Dredge, posted 08-30-2020 10:42 PM Dredge has not yet responded

  
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