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Author Topic:   Phat Unplugged
Percy
Member
Posts: 20957
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 3.1


(8)
Message 126 of 171 (889093)
11-02-2021 10:38 AM
Reply to: Message 120 by Phat
11-01-2021 8:27 PM


Re: Phats Health Update (November 1st,2021)
Replying to both Message 120 and Message 121.

Phat writes:

My diabetes is out of control.

Why is that not a surprise? You've been acting delusional for months now. Why would you think your delusional behavior is limited to just gold, government authoritarianism and the national debt? You've got to assume that you're delusional in all aspects of your life.

Do not entertain any of your own ideas about how to treat yourself. Do not listen to yourself at all. Everything you do should be under a doctor's advice and orders. Do this or you will die after losing a limb or two.

I'm going to beat a dead horse and remind you that you have nearly zero ability to make connections between ideas and facts. Almost everything you believe is what appeals to you, not what's based in fact. You only believe factual things that immediately beat you over the head if you go against them. If you somehow came to believe your TV would still work after being unplugged, you would immediately be disabused of this silly idea. Or if you somehow came to believe stoves aren't hot, you would immediately be disabused of this silly idea.

But taking your medications, monitoring your blood sugar, and eating appropriately does not provide immediate feedback. It's as if when you unplugged the TV it took a couple years before it stopped working. In the months after unplugging it you might come to believe that your TV really doesn't need to be plugged in, because the feedback wasn't immediate. And so in the exact same way, when you ignore your medication and don't check your blood sugar and don't eat appropriately and yet you still feel much the same after a few months, you come to believe that diabetes care isn't really that important. But, as is true of almost all your ideas, you'd be wrong. Dead wrong.

The delay between your self-abuse and your death was at one time decades, but it has now caught up to you and you now have just a couple years. If you can turn this around you might live a couple more decades, if you're lucky, but if not then, well, don't bother registering for the 2024 election.

You are not competent to run your own life. You're probably not even competent to follow the advice of doctors, but that's still your best hope, unless you can afford to hire a full time nurse named Megadeath who's as scary as her name.

You will not be with us two years from now. I hope you prove me wrong.

I also plan on praying more every day...I think I can do it with God's help...

You Christians constantly remind me of the joke of the devout believer caught in a flood who as the waters rise declines assistance from the police, a rowboat, and a helicopter, saying each time that the Lord would protect him. God expresses surprise when the man shows up in heaven the next day, saying he didn't understand how the man could have drowned since he'd sent the police, a rowboat and a helicopter. You're going to turn up in heaven and God will be flabbergasted, sputtering about making available to you for years the full depth and breadth of modern diabetic medicine.

While in college I met a girl who had Type I diabetes. She was attending nursing school, and she graduated and became a nurse, and we remained friends. Being in the health field she was acutely aware of all the dangers of diabetes and took scrupulous care of herself. She was one of the early adopters of the diabetes pump, having started using one back in 1979. Despite how well she cared for herself she died at age 47 from complications of diabetes, leaving behind a husband and two sons.

There, I've beaten this dead horse to smithereens now.

--Percy


This message is a reply to:
 Message 120 by Phat, posted 11-01-2021 8:27 PM Phat has seen this message but not replied

  
Percy
Member
Posts: 20957
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 3.1


(5)
Message 127 of 171 (889094)
11-02-2021 11:07 AM
Reply to: Message 121 by Phat
11-01-2021 8:33 PM


Re: The Pandemic Accelerated My Health Problems
Do not listen to anyone telling you your A1C is unimportant.

You and LNA and Marc and Christian7 and Michael MD are members of a large class of people who judge truth by how clearly and effectively it was communicated, how certain and confident someone seems, how well it aligns with what they already believe, and the effectiveness of its emotional appeal.

A couple examples. This sounds good, right:

"Mark my words, this election was stolen. We're going to prove it in court, and then those lying, thieving Democrats will get what's coming to them and rot in prison. Our country will be free again."

Or how about this:

"Mark my words, the Democrats are bankrupting our country. Our national debt is growing at $5 billion a day, and it's our children who are going to suffer for it and pay the price. If we don't want our country run into the ground then we have to kick the Democrats out, and then our country can become great again."

Nice, huh. Anyone can write garbage like this, it's easy, and the "likes" pile up much faster when you write stuff like this than when you write true things like, "As a proportion of GDP there is nothing scary about our national debt." Doesn't really get the blood boiling like the other stuff, does it? And when one's subconscious is roiled with worry about one's health problems, it really helps tamp it down if you can distract yourself by getting worked up over fictional crises.

--Percy

Edited by Percy, : Grammar.


This message is a reply to:
 Message 121 by Phat, posted 11-01-2021 8:33 PM Phat has not replied

  
Percy
Member
Posts: 20957
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 3.1


(1)
Message 164 of 171 (889174)
11-08-2021 9:19 AM
Reply to: Message 146 by PaulK
11-07-2021 12:48 PM


Re: Research, smesearch. Who needs it!
PaulK writes:

quote:
So it does not matter what anybody eats?

He didn’t say anything like that.

etc...
etc...
etc...

He doesn't even understand what *he* writes, let alone what other people write.

--Percy


This message is a reply to:
 Message 146 by PaulK, posted 11-07-2021 12:48 PM PaulK has not replied

  
Percy
Member
Posts: 20957
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 3.1


(5)
Message 165 of 171 (889175)
11-08-2021 9:46 AM
Reply to: Message 153 by Phat
11-07-2021 2:49 PM


Re: Type 1 and Type 2
Phat writes:

Years later, after I went to good endocrinologists (who in my opinion gave me too much insulin--they never measured what I actually needed).

Even back in the 1970's when I had a close friend who was an actual practicing diabetic the importance of monitoring blood sugar so you could work out how much insulin you needed at any given time was well established. If this endocrinologist wasn't stressing this then he was definitely not a "good endocrinologist". My guess is that you're calling him a "good endocrinologist" because you liked him and not because of any display of medical expertise.

So the next step I took was going to what I should have done in the beginning--going to lo-carb advocates.

By the time you went to the low-carb specialists it was far too late for that. By that point a a low carb diet could only act as a supplement to medications like insulin for your dangerous blood sugar levels. If he were reputable he would have seen your A1C and sent you right back to the endocrinologist. That he tried to help you means he was either a quack or an opportunist.

There is only one alternative for you now: insulin. You need insulin in one or more of the many provided forms along with self monitoring so you know when and how much to take and can establish a routine of meals and medication. Then there are a variety of medications available that can be helpful. There's acarbose or miglitol to mitigate the sugar spikes of meals, biguanides like metformin can increase your sensitivity to insulin, and a host of others.

Diabetes causes 73,000 amputations annually, and about 79,000 deaths, the 7th leading cause. How much of all that is due to adopting the wrong course of treatment or not following the treatment, who knows?

--Percy


This message is a reply to:
 Message 153 by Phat, posted 11-07-2021 2:49 PM Phat has replied

Replies to this message:
 Message 166 by Phat, posted 11-10-2021 1:26 PM Percy has replied

  
Percy
Member
Posts: 20957
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 3.1


Message 167 of 171 (889215)
11-10-2021 4:39 PM
Reply to: Message 166 by Phat
11-10-2021 1:26 PM


Re: Type 1 and Type 2
Phat writes:

By the time i see him and have another blood sugar measurement...

If you're talking about an A1C test, I thought you just had one. Why would you need another already?

You should be checking your blood sugar several times a day so that you can properly medicate. Use of long acting insulin does not mean that your blood sugar can't experience highs and lows during the day, particularly around meals. As meal time approaches you should check your blood sugar in case it is low so that you can eat earlier than you normally would, or perhaps have an appropriate snack like orange juice. And a little after meal time you should check it again in case it is spiking so you can take some short acting insulin. I hope you have some.

--Percy


This message is a reply to:
 Message 166 by Phat, posted 11-10-2021 1:26 PM Phat has replied

Replies to this message:
 Message 168 by Phat, posted 11-26-2021 9:57 AM Percy has replied

  
Percy
Member
Posts: 20957
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 3.1


Message 169 of 171 (889431)
11-26-2021 10:40 AM
Reply to: Message 168 by Phat
11-26-2021 9:57 AM


Re: Type 1 and Type 2
High blood sugar has a number of negative health consequences, some that you noted, others that you didn't such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and nerve problems. You know that 177 is too high for a fasting blood sugar (morning blood sugar before breakfast), which is what I assume you mean when you said "morning 177". Your target range for morning blood sugar should be 80 to 130.

The ultimate goal is to wean you off reliance on insulin, which may or may not be possible, we don't know yet. That will be between you and your endocrinologist. For now, stop ravaging your body's health with high blood sugar by taking enough insulin in the morning to get it below 130. Up to 180 two hours after meals is okay as long as it is gradually declining (that's the ADA recommendation - personally that sounds very high to me and I like the International Diabetes Federation recommendation of 140).

You might try taking pre and post blood sugar readings for various activities like fasting and exercise and see if you can ever get your blood sugar to occasionally drop below 100.

--Percy


This message is a reply to:
 Message 168 by Phat, posted 11-26-2021 9:57 AM Phat has not replied

  
Percy
Member
Posts: 20957
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 3.1


(1)
Message 171 of 171 (889442)
11-27-2021 9:42 AM
Reply to: Message 170 by LamarkNewAge
11-26-2021 9:34 PM


Re: Type 1 and Type 2
LamarkNewAge writes:

Sorry to ask, but what good does eating organic, verses non organic, do?

There are hints of an inverse relationship between consumption of organic food and risk of T2D. They haven't established why, but one speculation is lower levels of pesticides. I found a couple studies:


-Percy

This message is a reply to:
 Message 170 by LamarkNewAge, posted 11-26-2021 9:34 PM LamarkNewAge has not replied

  
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